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How to crochet a v stitch

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The double crochet v-stitch is such a fast and versatile stitch made by using only double crochets and chains. It creates a beautiful lacy fabric which has good drape and flow. If you know how to double crochet, chain, and skip stitches, you can easily learn this stitch. Are you ready to learn how to crochet the v-stitch?

Before we get to the how to make a v crochet stitch instructions, let’s look at the anatomy of a completed row of v-stitches.

The easiest mistake to make when learning how to do the v-stitch in crochet is confusing where the chain 1 spaces are. When you move beyond row 1, you will be working in each “v” and not in the gap created between each “v”.

As you work through the crochet v-stitch tutorial, you will see that instructions are written out as well as abbreviated like they are in a pattern. My hope is that, for those of you struggling to read patterns, seeing the instructions side by side with the abbreviations will help you grasp how to read a pattern a little better.

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How to Crochet V-Stitch:

To begin chain (ch) a multiple of 3 + 1

Double crochet in the 4th chain from hook (dc in 4th ch from hook) – the chain 3 and double crochet will count as your first v-stitch.

Skip two chains and double crochet in the next chain (sk 2 chs, dc in next ch)

Chain one then double crochet in the same stitch. (ch 1, dc in same st)

Continue to skip 2 chains then double crochet, chain 1 double crochet in the next stitch. (*sk 2 ch, (dc, ch 1, dc) in next st, repeat from * to end of row.)

The final v-stitch of the row goes in the last ch.

Turn and chain 3 (turn, ch 3) – the chain 3 will count as your first dc and ch 1

Double crochet in the first chain 1 space of the row below (dc in ch-1 sp)

Double crochet in the next chain 1 space (dc in next ch-1 sp)

Chain 1 and double crochet in the same chain 1 space (ch 1, dc in same ch-1 sp)

Continue to double crochet, chain 1, and double crochet in each chain 1 space. (*(dc, ch 1, dc) in each ch-1 sp, repeat from * to end of row)

Continue to work each row like the second row and you will start the see the “v”s stack nicely on top of each other.

That’s it! You’ve learned how to crochet the v-stitch! Now you need a pattern to use it in. Each pattern in the Coco Crochet Series uses a combo of double crochet v-stitches and half double crochets.

The Crochet Toddler Cocoon Shrug is almost entirely v-stitches. Penny’s Scarf is my newest v-stitch crochet pattern and is a quick and fun one skein project that uses a variant of the double crochet v-stitch. Which one will you make first?

Yarn used for the tutorial: Red Heart Strata which has been discontinued but can still be found on AMAZON!

Mollie Johanson / The Spruce

The V-stitch is a pretty crochet stitch that works up quickly. It’s a great stitch to know for working on big projects like afghans. But it’s also useful for crocheting many other types of projects.

Read through the written instructions below to see how this stitch typically is shared, then follow the photo tutorial for a visual guide to learning this crochet stitch.

Once you’ve finished learning how to crochet the v-stitch, find a simple crochet v-stitch pattern to try, such as this free crochet doll blanket pattern. You can also begin to learn different variations on the classic v-stitch, such as the crochet v-stitch shell.

V-Stitch Instructions

Start with a multiple of 3 + 7 stitches.

Abbreviations

  • ch = chain
  • dc = double crochet
  • ea = each
  • rep = repeat
  • sl st = slip stitch
  • st = stitch
  • sk = skip

The V-stitch: To complete each V-stitch, work 1 dc st, 1 ch st, and 1 more dc st in the same chain or space.

Crochet a foundation chain.

Row 1: dc in 4th ch from hook. The last 3 chs count as the 1st dc in the row. Ch 1, skip next ch, [dc in next ch, ch 1, dc in same ch. Skip next 2 chs.] Rep the sequence in brackets across the row. At the end of the row, ch 1, skip 2 chs, then work 1 dc in ea of the next 2 ch sts.

Row 2: the turning chain counts as the first dc in the row. Dc in next dc. Ch 1, work 1 v st in ea v st across the row. Ch 1, skip next ch, work 1 dc in ea of the last 2 dc sts.

Rep row 2 until the piece reaches the desired length. Secure the last stitch and weave in the ends.

September 25, 2020 By Kathryn Vercillo & filed under Crocheting Blog.

Whether you’re looking to create an interesting texture or eye-catching color pattern, the crochet V-stitch may be just what you need to pull off your perfect project. The technique is super easy to learn, and the repeating Vs create an openwork pattern that’s very visually appealing.

V-Stitch

Level: Easy

Abbreviations

Good to Know: While there are different ways to crochet this stitch, we’ll walk through the most common version. The double crochet V-stitch, also called a rope stitch, is made by crocheting DC, ch 1, DC into the same stitch, repeating across each row. Each row begins and ends with one DC stitch to create an even edge for the pattern.

Instructions

1. Crochet a chain that’s a multiple of 3 + 1. This example uses a chain of 16 (or 15 + 1).

2. Work into the fifth chain from the hook. This creates one double crochet at the beginning of the row and a space before your V-stitch. DC, ch 1, DC all into the same stitch. This is your first V-stitch.

3. Skip two stitches, then work a V-stitch into the following chain. The V-stitch, again and throughout, is worked as DC, ch 1, DC all in the same stitch.

4. Repeat the previous step all the way across the row. At the end, you should be left with 2 ch at the end of the row. Skip one chain. DC in the final chain.

5. Turn. Chain 3. (This counts as the double crochet at the beginning of the new row.)

6. Skip the first stitch. Working into the ch-1 space of the V from the previous row, crochet a V-stitch (DC, ch 1, DC). Crochet one V-stitch in each ch-1 space across row.

7. Double crochet in the top of the turning chain to complete row.

Repeat the steps above to continue building your V-stitch swatch.

Now you know how to crochet the most common form of the V-stitch!

The V-stitch seems to be taking the crochet world by storm right now. It is a classic crochet stitch that is very easy to work. If you can crochet chains and double crochet stitches, then you can create scarves, blankets, and other items using this stitch. Perhaps the reason it’s so trendy right now is because it’s simple to crochet but has a textured, detailed look that appears overly complex to others. This guide will show you how to work a classic double crochet V-stitch, as well as several variations.

Classic Double Crochet V-Stitch

Here are the instructions for creating a row of classic double crochet V-stitch. You’ll see that there are V-stitches throughout the middle of the piece with two double crochets at the beginning and end of each row.

Crochet a chain that is a multiple of 3+7 stitches. In this example, I’ve crocheted a starting chain of 22 stitches (15+7).

Dc in 4th ch from hook. (This creates two double crochets next to each other because the last three in the row serve as the first double crochet).

In next chain work dc, ch 1, dc. This is the V-stitch.

Repeat #4 and #5 across row until there are four chains left in your starting chain.

Dc in each of the last two stitches. This completes your first row of V-stitches bordered by 2 double crochet stitches on either end of the row.

Now you’re ready to start your next row, so turn the work and ch 3 for your first dc of the new row.

Work into the center chain one space of the first V-stitch. Dc, ch 1, dc to create a V-stitch right in the center of the V-stitch in the row below.

Repeat #11 and #12 across row to the end of the V-stitches.

Dc in each of the last two stitches.

Repeat #9 -#15 until the project is the length you desire. Finish off and weave in ends.

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Hi everyone, it’s Hannah, Tiffany’s daughter here!

I feel like we’ve been making a lot girl themed blankets lately (probably because there is so much lovely blush and peach colors all over Target right now that we can’t get enough of), so a few weeks ago I decided it was time to try making a blanket for a baby boy. I’ve had this beautiful Caron Simply Soft Light Country Blue in my yarn basket that I’ve been wanting to use forever, but I couldn’t ever come up with an idea that I liked.

A few months ago my mom posted the double crochet v stitch on her daisyfarm.stitches Instagram account and I’ve been wanting to try it ever since I saw it. I think it’s actually a great beginner stitch once you’ve mastered double crochet because it’s pretty easy to always see where you need to insert your hook. I love how even the lines turn out and I love that the v stitches make the stripes look like small chevrons, so I decided to give it a shot and finally use my blue yarn.

I actually started this blanket over several times because I couldn’t figure out a color combo and stripe pattern that I liked. I thought about adding in a nice gold/mustard color to give it a more modern look, but the mustard just didn’t look right with the bright white. So I decided to just keep it simple with the blue, white and gray and I think it ended up with a really nice modern feel for a baby boy room.

One thing you should know about this stitch is that it does work up quite loose because of the gaps between the v’s so you may want to do a quick practice swatch and experiment with hook sizes. I tend to crochet loose myself, so I probably could have gone down a hook size (I used an H), but instead I just tried to watch myself and keep things tight as I went and I think it turned out fine.

Caron Simply Soft (100% acrylic, 170 g/6 oz, 288 m/315 yds)

2 skeins White, 1 skein each Light Country Blue, Gray Heather

Size H/5.00mm hook, tapestry needle, scissors

Finished size 34 in x 38 in

Single Crochet (SC): Insert your hook, yarn over (YO) and pull up a loop, YO, pull through two loops.

Double Crochet (DC): YO, insert your hook, YO, pull up a loop, YO, pull through two loops, YO, pull through remaining two loops.

Chain 100 in White (or any even number).

Row 1: In the fourth chain from the hook work 2 DC. SK the next chain space, *2 DC in the next chain space, then SK the next chain.* Repeat * across the row and work one DC into the very last chain. Chain 3 and turn. (This will count as your first DC) on the next row.

Row 2: Work 2 DC in between each pair of DC from the row below. Insert your hook into the space between them. Repeat across the whole row and end with one DC into the top of the first chain three. Chain three and turn.

Continue repeating row 2 for the rest of the blanket. Here is a close-up picture of the stitch. You can see that that two double crochets always go in between the two double crochets from the previous row.

Here is the color pattern that I used:

Repeat from the beginning until you reach your desired length. For the size I made, I ended up with four rows of blue stripes when I finished.

Tie off and weave in all ends before starting the border. For this blanket I decided to just keep it simple and work two rows of single crochet around the edge.

Pull up a loop with blue in any corner. Work one SC in that space. Work SC around the entire blanket keeping your stitches to about 2 per each block of color on the sides. Check your work often to prevent rippling and adding too many stitches. Work 3 SC into each corner space. When you return to the starting corner, work remaining two SC and slip stitch to join and tie off.

I hope you enjoy making this double crochet v stitch blanket! It really is a fun stitch to work with and a good one if you don’t want to concentrate too hard and need a nice Netflix project :). I think there are a lot of cool stripe and color combinations that would look good with this stitch, so I hope you’ll share your creativity with us on Instagram! Be sure to use #daisyfarmcrafts – we’d love to see your work!

Created By: Allison &nbsp| Updated: August 21, 2019 | 40 Comments

So the other day I got a ginormous box of yarn with 15 different colors in it. How awesome is that? It all started because I wanted this one color in particular (peacock which you can see in the very bottom of this pic at the top and in most of the DIY photos) and couldn’t find. So I ordered directly from the Red Heart website. But to get free shipping it needed to total so much and I didn’t see the point in spending money on shipping when I could instead spend $30 more than I had intended but have 15 amazing colors of yarn to play with.

And since I recently made a gigantic V double crochet throw for my bedroom, I thought it would be a good time to teach the stitch to y’all. And if you’re wondering, I’ll be sharing my big purple bad boy with you sometime next week. Woot! (that’s kind of my new thing… everything exciting is followed by – woot!)

For this stitch you can use just about any yarn or any hook size but I used Red Heart Super Saver Yarn and an H hook.

Chain an even number of times.

Double crochet in the fourth chain from your hook. Chain one.

Skip the next chain and double crochet TWICE into the chain just after. See how you can tell in the pic that you’ve got two little clumps of two doubles together? Perfect.

Continue this down the entire length doing your last section of two double crochets in that final stitch.

If you’re changing colors, do that now and chain twice.

Double crochet IN BETWEEN the first clump (will be your chain of 3 and one double crochet). Go through the doubles, not the loops like you normally would.

Continue down the line making two double crochets in between two from the row before. Can you see how the V shape is starting to form?

Work down the end and before cutting your yarn and changing colors, do a quick glance down to make sure all of your stitches are through the two doubles and not the empty spaces on either side (it’s easy to get confused the second row but it’s easier after that!)

As you keep stitching, the v shape becomes more and more prevalent. When done all in one color and tightly stitched you get an interesting, chevron-esque pattern.

When done loosely in a single color with a bulky thread you get a lot more space in between each of the Vs and the look is completely different, but you’ll see all about that next week when I unveil my afghan!

But until then, bust out that yarn and get to this v double crochet stitch. It’s so impressive and so easy to do and I love that after row 2, there’s no counting. It’s all autopilot from there!

Updated on August 30, 2020

The Sweet Stitch is a simple stitch to work but it creates a squishy openwork fabric!

You’re going to love how quickly this stitch works up! The end result of this combination of stitches is an openwork fabric that has a bit of stretch to it.

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The Crochet Sweet Stitch

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About the Stitch:

The sweet stitch is a lacy stitch. It is made up of v-stitches that are set in-between rows of front post stitches. If the front post stitches sound intimidating, don’t worry! You will find a video tutorial for this stitch down below.

Types of Projects:

What kind of projects would you use this stitch in? I have seen some scarves worked with this stitch and I have heard about it being a great stitch for a blanket. I would love to see this stitch though in a garment! Maybe a cardigan or summer top. I think because of the stretch in the fabric, it would lend itself well to a wearable item.

Close up of the Crochet Sweet Stitch

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Close up of the Crochet Sweet Stitch

Materials:

For this tutorial I will be using the Caron x Pantone yarn by Yarnspirations along with a 5.5 mm crochet hook. The hook shown here and in the video below is a wooden streamline hook by Furls Crochet.

You may use any hook and yarn combination though for your project!

This stitch is worked in rows in this tutorial. At the end of each row you will need to chain 2 and turn your work.

Don’t forget to check out the free video tutorial linked below!

To begin, make a slip knot and then chain your desired number of chains. For this stitch pattern you will need a multiple of three (3) stitches.

For my swatch I will be making a foundation chain of 21 stitches.

Row One:

Begin by skipping the first 3 chains and into the next chain, work a v-stitch. To work your v-stitch, work one double crochet, chain 1, double crochet all into the next stitch. Skip the next two chains and v-stitch into the next chain. Repeat that last step (sk 2, v-stitch in the next) all the way across to your final two chain stitch. Skip the next chain st and double crochet in the final stitch. Chain two and turn your work.

Row Two:

Skip the first double crochet stitch. Around the post of the next stitch, work one front post double crochet stitch.

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How to insert your hook around the front post of the double crochet

To work the front post double crochet stitch, yarn over, bring your hook in front of your work and insert your hook around the post of the next stitch inserting your hook from right to left, yarn over and draw up a loop. Yarn over and draw through two loops. Yarn over and draw through the final two loops on your hook. Front post double crochet stitch is now made.

Chain 1, work a front post double crochet stitch around each of the next 2 stitches. Chain 1, front post double crochet around the next two stitches. Repeat this all the way across and work a double crochet in your final stitch. Chain 2 and turn your work.

Supplies:

(SCROLL TO PRINT PATTERN for Crochet Infinity Scarf)

  • 1-2 skeins of yarn – depending on how long you choose to make it
  • crochet hook size H
  • scissors
  • crochet needle

Instructions:

Chain stitch 25.

Row 1: Double crochet (dc) into the 4th loop from the hook. (Those first 3 loops become your first double crochet.) Chain 1. Double crochet into the same loop you just did. This creates your first v-stitch – dc, ch 1, dc.

Skip a loop. Double crochet into the next loop, chain 1, double crochet into the same loop. Skip a loop. Repeat until you get to the end of the row.

On the last loop at the end, double crochet. You should have 11 v-stitches with a double crochet on either end of the row.

Row 2: Turn your work and chain 3. Crochet a v-stitch (dc, ch 1, dc) into each of the previous row’s v-stitches, into the space the V creates. Then double crochet into the last loop.

Row 3 – Row 80: Repeat row 2 until you get to row 80.

NOTE: for the finished scarf you see in these images, I crocheted 80 rows. But you can choose to crochet as many as how you’d like yours to look – either going around your neck once, twice, or it could be once and a 1/2 to make it hang like a low cowl!

Finish: When you’re done with your rows and have it the length you’d like, tie off the end – but leave a LONG tail, as you’ll use it to sew it together.

Gather the two ends of the scarf together and sew them with your crochet needle and the end of your long tail. Once they are sewn together, tie off your tail in a knot to hold it and hide both tails into the piece. Trim off any excess.

It’s ready to wrap and wear! Snuggle up this winter with a brand new handmade scarf. Make a few extra for all your friends to stay cozy too!

Copy and Paste to Print:

Crochet V-Stitch Infinity Scarf Pattern

Chain stitch 25.
Row 1: Double crochet (dc) into the 4th loop from the hook. (Those first 3 loops become your first double crochet.)
Chain 1. Double crochet into the same loop you just did. This creates your first v-stitch – dc, ch 1, dc.
Skip a loop. Double crochet into the next loop, chain 1, double crochet into the same loop. Skip a loop. Repeat until you get to the end of the row.
On the last loop at the end, double crochet. You should have 11 v-stitches with a double crochet on either end of the row.
Row 2: Turn your work and chain 3. Crochet a v-stitch (dc, ch 1, dc) into each of the previous row’s v-stitches, into the space the V creates. Then double crochet into the last loop.
Row 3 – Row 80: Repeat row 2 until you get to row 80.
Finish: When you’re done with your rows and have it the length you’d like, tie off the end – but leave a LONG tail, as you’ll use it to sew it together.
Gather the two ends of the scarf together and sew them with your crochet needle and the end of your long tail. Once they are sewn together, tie off your tail in a knot to hold it and hide both tails into the piece. Trim off any excess.

Marie is a mother of 3 living in Seattle, WA. She’s been the founder and managing editor of Make and Takes for the last 13 years, curating a DIY website with kids craft tutorials, home decor ideas, and simple recipes. As well as the author of the book, Make and Takes for Kids. Marie graduated with an Early Childhood and Elementary teaching degree and is currently teaching 1st Grade in Seattle. She loves sharing her creativity here at Make and Takes!

Published: March 31, 2020 | Last Modified: March 31, 2020

Not sure if the V stands for Very-pretty, but it certainly is! The V-stitch is a simple but beautiful stitch and is often used for blankets, hats and shawls. The abbreviation is V-ST in most patterns. The stitch might look complex, but it’s super easy to make. In the tutorial below, I will show you step by step how to make the V-stitch. So watch, learn and let’s create together!

V-stitch: the basics

There are different ways to crochet the V-stitch. The most common version is worked with (1 DC, 1 ch, 1 DC) into the same stitch. Other options would be with HDC or SC or 2 chains instead of 1. Each pattern will tell you which version of the V-stitch you’ll have to make. If nothing is mentioned, you can assume it’s the basic V-stitch which I’ll show you in this tutorial. Enjoy, and before you know, you will be an expert!

Tutorial: how to make a v-stitch

Abbreviations:
ch: chain
yo: yarn over
dc: double crochet
rep: repeat
sk: skip

Materials:
– Katia Basic Merino
– Crochet hook 4mm

Note:
Start with a multiple of 3 + 2. In this tutorial we chain 14 (12 + 2).

1. yarn over (yo) insert hook in 4th chain (ch) from the hook
2. double crochet (dc)
3. chain (ch) 1
4. double crochet (dc) in the same chain (ch)/ stitch (st)

5. skip 2 chains / stitches & repeat step 2 – 4 (= v-stitch)
till end of the row
6. double crochet (dc) in the last chain
7. chain (ch) 3 & turn your work
8. v-stitch (v-st) in each chain space (ch sp) of the previous row

9. double crochet (dc) in the 3rd chain (ch) of the previous row
10. That’s it!

Video

To make it easier, I’ve made a video tutorial showing you how to make the v-stitch.

The V-Stitch is my go to stitch when making blankets. It works up quick and makes large holes. Large holes are great for reducing the risk of SIDS with babies and also great for those who love sticking their toes through their handmade blankets. This is the 3rd blanket I have made like this.. and I want to explain to you how you can make your own- for any occasion.

Supplies
You can use any yarn and hook that you wish. I usually like to use larger hooks and med-worsted weight yarn. For this blanket I actually used I Love This Yarn and size P crochet hook.

Your starting FSC
I start my blankets with the Foundation Single Crochet. I learned how to do the FSC through THIS VIDEO by Moogly.
Your number of starting FSC will depend on what size blanket you want. To know how many FSC to start with, you will need to make your FSC in counts of 3 +4. If you decide to start with a Chain instead of FSC, you will just need to make your starting Chain in counts of 3 + 7. Those last 3 will count as your first DC.

Row 1
For the first row you will CH 3 for your first DC. Skip 1 stitch. all into next stitch**Skip 2 FSC, into the next stitch. Repeat from ** across until you have two stitches left. Skip one stitch. DC into the last stitch.

Every Row after Row 1
For each row you will CH 3 for your first DC. Then you will into each V stitch. Then DC into the last DC. Turn.

Simple Border
For the border I put one Half Double Crochet into each of the FSC. When working up the sides of the blanket, HDC into the side of each DC and top of each DC. When working into the top of the blanket you will HDC into the top of each DC and into the middle of each V stitch. On the corners I put 3 HDC.