Categories
Careers-in-Art

How to cure brainfreeze

How to cure brainfreeze

“Brain Freeze” is the intense headache people often get when they eat ice cream, popsicles, milkshakes, frozen drinks and other really cold foods. It is a very sharp, stabbing pain in the forehead and most of us have experienced it at one time or another.

Brain Freeze (sometimes called an “Ice Cream Headache”) is caused by the blood vessels above the roof of your mouth responding to prevent a loss of heat in your head and therefore protect your brain. The blood vessels in your head widen to let in more blood (more heat). This rapid swelling of the blood vessels, which contain sensitive nerves, is what causes a headache.

At one time it was thought that this phenomenon happened only in hot weather, but in fact, it can happen in any temperature. It’s the temperature of the food that you are eating that causes the effect.

7 Ways to Stop “Brain Freeze” in its tracks:

  1. Press your tongue against the roof of the mouth to warm the area.
  2. Tilt your head back for about 10 seconds.
  3. Drink a liquid that is warmer than the cold substance that caused the headache.
  4. Take small bites or sips and let them warm on your tongue before they touch the roof of your mouth.
  5. Make a mask with your hands and cover your mouth and nose; breathe quickly.
  6. Press your thumb against the roof of your mouth.
  7. Since Brain Freeze starts after you swallow, you can actually prevent it by holding the cold substance against the roof of your mouth before you swallow. But this technique seems so illogical most people won’t even try it!
  8. Give up all frozen treats (just kidding).

So, next time you reach for that Frozen Daiquiri, remember these 7 ways to prevent Brain Freeze, and enjoy!

How to cure brainfreeze

As one of life’s simple pleasures, ice cream should not have the capacity to cause spontaneous and agonizing pain immediately after ingestion. Yet ice cream and other extremely cold food frequently catches us off-guard by inciting what is known as “brain freeze” or “ice cream headache.” Fortunately, there’s a way to alleviate this harsh side effect.

According to Johns Hopkins University, a bout of radiating pain in your head after eating cold food is known as cold neuralgia or sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia. It’s likely caused by your body entering survival mode when it detects a freezing temperature on the palate (roof) of the mouth: our system constricts blood vessels in the palate to preserve our core temperature. When they rapidly open back up, a pain signal is sent to the brain via the trigeminal nerve. Since that nerve leads directly to the midface and forehead, your face bears the brunt of the referred pain from the mouth.

A brain freeze typically lasts less than five minutes. But when your head is throbbing, that can feel like forever. To minimize the pain, the best strategy is to warm the palate up. You can do this by pressing your tongue or a thumb against the roof of your mouth, by drinking a warm liquid, or both. Covering your face and breathing into your hands can also warm the air inside your mouth that was chilled by the ice cream.

If you want to take preventive measures, avoid gulping cold drinks and take smaller bites. Holding the ice cream in your mouth to warm it before swallowing can also reduce the potential for a painful end to your cone or slushy drink.

How to cure brainfreeze

When you eat or drink something cold, like an ice cold coffee or ice cream, then you may get a mind-numbing headache that starts 20-50 seconds after the trigger, and lasts for around 5 minutes. This type of headache is known as brain freeze, and is medically termed as sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia. This pain happens when something cold comes in contact with the roof of your mouth, which causes a surge of blood to suddenly go into your brain. Instead of avoiding your favorite foods or drinks, use these tips on how to get rid of brain freeze.

Press the roof of your mouth with your tongue, which will warm up the area, reduce the blood rush to the brain, and relieve the brain freeze. Keep the tongue in place for 10-15 seconds until the pain goes away. You may also place your thumb on your mouth’s roof, due to which the area will warm up to counteract the brain freeze. Make a mask with your hands to cover your mouth and nose, and breathe quickly to warm up your mouth, and get rid of brain freeze.

How to cure brainfreeze

To get rid of brain freeze, drink a warm beverage, such as some warm water or tea. Make sure that it is not too hot to give a serious burn to your mouth. It should be slightly warm, or may be at room temperature. This will heat up your mouth and stop brain freeze.

How to cure brainfreeze

Take smaller sips or bites of the cold food or drink, rather than consuming it very fast. It is also better to move the food or drink around inside your mouth before you swallow it, so that your mouth gets adapted to the food temperature, and does not give you a brain freeze.

How to cure brainfreeze

Take a brisk walk if you have been hit by a brain freeze. This will allow more blood to flow into your brain and other parts of the body, and ease the pain due to brain freeze quickly.

How to cure brainfreeze

Giving a nice massage to your temple or back of your neck can be a good way to get rid of brain freeze. If you have pain, you automatically start rubbing that spot to feel better. The same applies to the pain you get with brain freeze too.

How to cure brainfreeze

Another way of preventing brain freeze from appearing again while you are eating or drinking something cold is to mix it with a warmer ingredient. Think about adding some syrup to your ice cream or add some drops of lukewarm water or lemon juice to your drink.

How to cure brainfreeze

This article is merely informative, oneHOWTO does not have the authority to prescribe any medical treatments or create a diagnosis. We invite you to visit your doctor if you have any type of condition or pain.

If you want to read similar articles to How To Get Rid Of Brain Freeze, we recommend you visit our Family health category.

How to cure brainfreeze

182050318

I scream, you scream — and sometimes we all really scream while eating ice cream because … brain freeze.

That sudden, short headache that hits right when we’re eating or drinking something super-cold — which is actually called sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia in scientist speak — is our body’s way of telling us to slow down, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center neuroscientist Dwayne Godwin, Ph.D., explained in a 2013 news release.

“Our mouths are highly vascularized, including the tongue — that’s why we take our temperatures there,” Godwin said. “But drinking a cold beverage fast doesn’t give the mouth time to absorb the cold very well.”

The rapid change in temperature at the back of the throat — where two arteries, one that sends blood to the brain and another that marks the beginning of brain tissue, meet — prompts the arteries to dilate and contract. The sensation is interpreted as pain in the brain, which signals you to ease up on the speed-eating.

To halt a brain freeze in its tracks, put down the ice cream cone or cold drink tout de suite, press your tongue against the roof of your mouth, or sip a warmish drink to restore your mouth to a normal temperature. You can also cover your nose and mouth with your hands and breathe into them to warm the air that’s getting to your palate.

Then, when you’ve got that brain freeze licked, go back to eating your ice cream — slowly!

How to cure brainfreeze

182050318

I scream, you scream — and sometimes we all really scream while eating ice cream because … brain freeze.

That sudden, short headache that hits right when we’re eating or drinking something super-cold — which is actually called sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia in scientist speak — is our body’s way of telling us to slow down, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center neuroscientist Dwayne Godwin, Ph.D., explained in a 2013 news release.

“Our mouths are highly vascularized, including the tongue — that’s why we take our temperatures there,” Godwin said. “But drinking a cold beverage fast doesn’t give the mouth time to absorb the cold very well.”

The rapid change in temperature at the back of the throat — where two arteries, one that sends blood to the brain and another that marks the beginning of brain tissue, meet — prompts the arteries to dilate and contract. The sensation is interpreted as pain in the brain, which signals you to ease up on the speed-eating.

To halt a brain freeze in its tracks, put down the ice cream cone or cold drink tout de suite, press your tongue against the roof of your mouth, or sip a warmish drink to restore your mouth to a normal temperature. You can also cover your nose and mouth with your hands and breathe into them to warm the air that’s getting to your palate.

Then, when you’ve got that brain freeze licked, go back to eating your ice cream — slowly!

Some entrepreneurs spend months trying to raise more money than they actually need to achieve proof of concept. Many get stuck on the grand vision of their company’s future instead of deploying the resources and assets at their disposal. I call this entrepreneurial brain freeze.

When I started my first venture, it took me six months to get a meeting with angel investors. I was so excited that I spent 72 hours straight marathon writing a business plan and financial forecast in order to convince the investors why I needed $2 million to start my company.

I showed up in a fancy suit and tie, and the first thing that the investors did was rip up my forecast and ask me what I could do with just $200,000. I was initially shocked that they would lowball me like that, but in the end, realized they were right. This experience taught me, in retrospect, that if I had just tried to raise $200,000 instead of $2 million months earlier, I would have reached the starting line much faster. I had to cure my own case of entrepreneurial brain freeze.

At my loan-advisory office, we speak with business owners who show the common symptoms of brain freeze: they’re stuck within the confines of their company vision and unwilling to stray from their buttoned up business plans. Before discussing funding options, we first ask them what they need the money for and why. The reality is that usually there is a way to meet their objectives with much less money.

The business owner might be foregoing short-term profits by seeking less startup capital, but they are moving commerce sooner, and that is what’s important. The best proof of a viable business is active commerce, not funding.

A few weeks ago, I met an entrepreneur who wanted to start a golf simulator business. He wanted to raise money for his own facility, with two owned or leased machines, and also wanted more capital to market his business. At the time of the call, though, he didn’t even have a proof of concept, no customers on the horizon and yet wanted to borrow or raise a couple of hundred thousand dollars in equity.

I had to take a step back with this entrepreneur instead of pushing him toward a loan that he would later regret. A better option was to partner with local golf stores by installing his simulators in their shops. By piggybacking off of the store’s existing customer base, the entrepreneur was drastically cutting his marketing dollars while also achieving a proof of concept in exchange for profit sharing with the existing golf store.

Instead of seeking $500,000 to launch his business, the entrepreneur only needed $50,000 to get started. This is a much more reasonable goal.

If you’re trying to borrow money before you’ve gotten one customer, you’re likely going to give away more equity than you have to, or it’s going to cost you way too much to borrow money. There can be huge benefit in shrinking a grandiose vision, shaking off the entrepreneurial brain freeze and proceeding with calculated baby steps rather than rushing a new business to the finish line.