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How to dewinterize a house

How to dewinterize a house

Maybe you head south for the winter months and are lucky to escape the harsh cold in the colder climates and trade it for the sun and warmth. However, as all good things come to an end, you return home to your residence. Now it is time to get the home ready for the warmer months, but how do you dewinterize a house? There are 12 steps to do this, let’s check them out.

When you left your home, you probably did a few things around the house such as turned off the power supply to the water heater, left the faucets in the “on” position, etc. To get your home back to livable conditions, there are a few things you need to do.

1. Reconnect Supply Tubes and Pipes to Dewinterize a House

If your dewinterization involved removing supply tubes and pipes, you may have a little work ahead of you.

  1. Start in one room first
  2. Check sinks, showers, and tubs and any appliance supplied by water
  3. Use a wrench or pliers to reattach the tubing and check that they are properly attached
  4. Leave shut off valves in the “off” position for the moment

2. Check Circuit Breaker Box

  1. After you reconnect the tubing and pipes, head over to the circuit breaker.
  2. Next, make sure that all of the individual breakers are in the “on” position in the box EXCEPT for the water heater. You could possibly burn out your heating element inside the water heater if left on without water to heat.
  3. If they are not, flip them to the “on” position. This will be necessary for you to have light in the home and also to turn on the water.

3. Turn on Main Water Supply

Slowly turn on the water supply; a quarter turn every 10-15 seconds is good

4. Valves for Boiler and Water Softener

  1. First, locate the valves. They are on the pipes and connected to the appliances
  2. Second, read the manufacturers manual or recommendations about how to fill the appliances
  3. Third, turn the valves “on” and follow the recommendations in the manual

5.Turn on Plumbing Fixtures to Dewinterize a House

  1. You will want to do this one at a time
  2. Open the fixture shut off valve about halfway and then the faucet
  3. Air may come out which is normal and then also a lot of water. Let the water come out until clear and then turn it off
  4. Check the pipes for any leaking as they may have burst or sprung a leak while you were gone. Inspecting them is important.
  5. Check dishwashers, water filters, toilets, etc. to make sure the water is working in the appliance
  6. Slowly open the valve to the fully open position

How to dewinterize a houseWater should flow out of the spigot

6. Check Outdoor Spigots

  1. Check the outdoor spigots that they open and close effectively
  2. Then, run water through and watch the water pressure. If it is low, there may be an issue that you need to investigate

After you have tested all of the water, now is the time to turn on the water heater.

7. Plug in appliances

  1. When you left, you probably unplugged anything with a chord so make sure you plug these back in

How to dewinterize a houseGas must be turned back on

8. Turn Gas Back On to Dewinterize a House

  1. Usually, when people leave a home for a long period of time, they will shut the gas off to the home. This is for safety.
  2. Make sure the valve is open for the gas furnace

How to dewinterize a houseCheck the sump pump when you return to your home from the winter escape

9. Check the Sump Pump

  1. The sump pump must run effectively in the home.
  2. Rain and melting snow can flood basements and then cause damage if the sump pump isn’t working correctly.

How to dewinterize a houseClogged gutters will cause a backup of water into the home

10. Check Roof Gutters for Leaves and Debris

  1. Roof gutters will fill up with leaves and debris while you are gone and will need to be cleaned. Take care of this before the next storm arrives as clogged gutters can cause a backup of water into the home.

11. Set the Temperature on the Thermostat to Dewinterize the House

  1. When you were away, you may have left the thermostat on a higher temperature, since no one was at home. Now is a good time to lower it and make sure the heat still works. Before the warmer weather sets in, it will be a good time for an a/c check as well.

12. Other Areas to Check

  1. Check around outside of the house for foundation issues that may have occurred and then contact a home inspector if there are issues
  2. As soon as you can, change the air filter in the home. Since the home was empty, the air filter may be clogged with dust
  3. Check the batteries on carbon dioxide and smoke detectors and then test the systems to make sure they work

Conclusion

It is important to follow the rules of dewinterizing your home to ensure it is done correctly. Water should be introduced slowly so there are no damages along the way. Remember, the home has been empty for a long time so slowly reintroducing its components is important. Do you have other ideas about dewinterizing your home or good advice before leaving the home? Drop us a note below and tell us about it!

How to Dewinterize Your Home Turn on Any Electrical Circuits That Have Been Shut Off. Connect All Water Supply Tubes and Pipes. Turn On the Main Water Supply. Open the Water Heater, Boiler, and Water Softener Water Valves. Turn on Plumbing Fixtures, One at a Time. Check Exterior Hose Spigot Faucets.

How much does it cost to Dewinterize a house?

The cost is usually around $300 to de-winterize the home and then re-winterize it after the inspection because the seller will likely require this. If, for some reason, the seller doesn’t require you to re-winterize the home, the de-winterization alone will usually cost half that.

Can I Dewinterize my house myself?

Dewinterizing your home gets the water flowing again. When you buy a house that has been in foreclosure, turning the water back on properly, or dewinterizing the house, protects the pipes from damage. You can hire a plumber for this job, or you can do it yourself.

Can you leave a house unheated in the winter?

Almost any room in the house can be closed off for the winter or at least have the temperature substantially reduced. But not every room can go entirely unheated because the flooring may crack, any plaster cracks will widen, and ice may form inside on the windows and ruin their finish.

How do I winterize my well tank?

How To Winterize Your Water Well Pump Turn off the power to the pump. Open a faucet to drain the residual water in the pump. Disconnect draining pipes and other units from the pump so you can be sure all water drains from the pump properly. Use an air compressor to blow out any additional water.

How do I turn my water back on?

Turn on the water at the main shut-off valve. Water valves are usually located near the street beneath a grate. If there are 2 valves, use the one closest to your house. If you can’t turn the valve by hand, you may need a wrench or a water key. Do not turn the valve on all at once.

How warm should you keep an empty house?

You can keep a vacant house at 50-55 degrees Fahrenheit to keep it safe. This is balancing two factors. First, you need to keep your heater running high enough to stay efficient. Most home HVAC systems can effectively maintain a temperature of 55 degrees through your entire home.

How long should you run water after shut off?

After all faucets are open, let the COLD WATER run for at least 30 minutes. During this time, also flush each toilet in your home 2 or 3 times. Running the COLD WATER should remove any old (stagnant) water which may contain higher concentrations of metals including lead, if it exists in your service line or plumbing.

How do you winterize a house without heat?

Winterizing a home without heat involves purging the plumbing and appliances of water and trimming weak overhanging branches Have the gutters inspected and cleaned. Trim nearby tree branches. Cut off the water supply into your house. Drain all water from the plumbing system. Drain the water heater.

How do you unfreeze a well?

Begin by locating the freeze point. Turn on a faucet to relieve pressure. Attempt to thaw the freeze point (if accessible) using a hair dryer or electric heat tape. Stop applying heat once water begins flowing and allow running water to melt the remaining ice in the water supply pipes.

How do you Dewinterize a house with antifreeze?

How to Dewinterize Your Home Turn on Any Electrical Circuits That Have Been Shut Off. Connect All Water Supply Tubes and Pipes. Turn On the Main Water Supply. Open the Water Heater, Boiler, and Water Softener Water Valves. Turn on Plumbing Fixtures, One at a Time. Check Exterior Hose Spigot Faucets.

What happens if you don’t winterize a house?

There is a strong misconception among home owners that winterizing your home’s water pipes when you leave your home vacant is unnecessary and a waste of time. Copper pipes are notoriously the worst, but all pipes can freeze and burst. Frozen pipes can swell up and then burst; or after they thaw out, leaks can develop.

What is the best temperature to leave an empty house in winter?

Set your thermostat appropriately. As a general rule of thumb, leave the heat on and set your thermostat between 55 and 60 degrees. Digital thermostats are a great fit for vacant homes or vacation rentals that are temporarily used.

How do you Dewinterize a house with a well?

Step 1: Turn off the water to the irrigation system at the main valve. Step 2: Set the automatic irrigation controller to the “rain” setting. Step 3: Turn on each of the valves to release pressure in the pipes. Step 4: Drain all of the water out of any irrigation components that might freeze.

Why is a house winterized?

By winterizing, the servicer makes sure that a vacant, abandoned home’s plumbing can endure a winter freeze. Typically, this means: draining the water from the pipes and the hot-water heater. putting “do not use” notices on the sinks, toilets, and other conspicuous areas of the home, and.

How do you turn water back on after winterization?

Locate Water Shutoff Valve and Open It: This is located in the house, usually in the basement or crawlspace. If you have more than one spigot, follow the correct pipe to the shutoff valve. Turn on Spigot: The homeowner should go back outside and turn the spigot on to allow the water to flow freely.

How do you get air out of pipes?

Turn on both the hot and cold water to about 1/8th of the way on all the faucets. Leave the water running for about two minutes. Start from the lowest faucet in the house to the highest faucet. This allows the water pressure of the system to force all of the air from the pipes and out through the faucets.

Should main water valve be open all the way?

Usually it’s best to have them all the way on to get the volume you need. And the regulators should be directly after them on the same line if they are the main valve. Although they might have separate regulators for each unit which would be located right where they each branch off.

How to dewinterize a house

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Typically, you winterize a home if it will be vacant for any period of time during the winter months. Winterizing involves draining water from the plumbing system to prevent damage that broken or leaky water pipes can cause. Even without freezing weather conditions, unused pipes can get damaged and leak. Shutting off the water supply helps prevent this. When you’re ready to move back in, reversing the process is easy to do.

Prepare to turn the water back on. First, remove the aerators from the sink and tub faucets. Use your hands to unscrew them from the faucet heads. If aerators are tight and hard to unscrew, use pliers and twist off.

Turn all faucets in the home to the “off” position before you open the shutoff valves to the supply lines. When you winterized, you should have left faucets in the “on” position. Remember to open the shutoff valves on the water supply lines to your refrigerator, dishwasher, washing machine and water softener if you have one.

Turn the power off at the breaker box for an electric hot water heater. Close the pressure relief valve on the water heater. Otherwise, water will run out when you begin to refill the tank. Open the cold water inlet valve at the heater. Next, go outside and turn on a hose faucet. This helps relieve pressure when you restart the flow of water through the main supply line to the house.

Open the main shutoff valve at the water meter. Turn the valve slowly — a quarter turn every 5 to 10 seconds, recommends ASPEC Residential Services, a home inspection service.You don’t want water pressure to build in the lines too quickly or you could have leaks. After you open the valve, check to see if water is running from the outside faucet.

Allow water to fill the tank of the hot water heater. Turn the power supply to the water heater back on after the tank fills completely.

Turn sink and tub faucets slowly to the “on” position. Test faucets one at a time in case there’s a leak. Turn on the cold water faucet first and then the hot. Run water slowly to make sure there are no leaks in the drain pipes. If the drains seem to be okay, increase the flow and flush the supply lines allowing the water to run from faucets for 10 to 20 minutes. Test the shower fixtures as well.

Open the shutoff valves on the toilets. Allow each toilet tank to fill completely and then flush several times. Check for leaks by looking to see if there is any water around the base of the toilet. Also, listen for the sound of running water inside the tank. Turn off the outside water faucet once water is flowing through the pipes and supply lines inside the house.

Check the plumbing system throughout the house for leaks. You will notice leaks more easily after you’ve run water to get the air out of the lines. Inspect under sinks and around the water heater for signs of water. Look for leaking pipes in the basement or crawlspace. Dripping and hissing noises are signs of a leak.

Turn off all faucets and screw the aerators back on. Check the water meter to see if it’s still turning. If it is and no water is being used, you have a leak somewhere.

If a home is standing vacant for a long period of time many people have their homes winterized. Basically, winterizing a home means the plumbing system is prepared to withstand cold winter temperatures and freezing pipes by draining all the water from the system including the water heater. Sometimes winterization companies will add anti freeze to all the floor drains, traps, and toilets. De-winterizing your home means “charging” or making the plumbing system ready for everyday use.

The first step in de-winterizing you plumbing system is to remove all of the aerators from the faucets. This includes all kitchen sinks, vanity sinks and laundry sinks. Sometimes there will be build-up in the lines and removing the aerators allows any build-up to drain out from the system.

Next, open the supply valves under each sink. Make sure the faucet handles are all in the closed position. When you are working on the kitchen sinks you should also check the supply line to the refrigerator and freezer. If it is not connected to the unit, make sure to close the valves at the supply line.

On the hot water heater, open the supply valve. Before you open the valve at the water meter, open an exterior hose bib. This is important for two reasons; you will be able to see that the water is actually on and it relieves some of the pressure when you “charge” the line to the house.

Now it is time to open the valve at the water meter. It is important to do this gently without jerking the valve open. It is a good rule to open the valve a quarter turn every 5-10 seconds. This way, the pressure of the water won’t shock the plumbing lines. If the pressure builds too quickly it can cause leaks within the system.

When you can see the water coming from the exterior hose bib then you can go into the house and check that the water heater is filling up. Normally you can hear the tank filling. You should not turn on an electric water heater until the tank is full.

Once you confirm the water heater is filling up you can begin turning the water on at each faucet. Again, you should do this slowly. Turning the water on at the faucet should purge out any sediment in the pipes and any air bubbles from the system. Let the water run for several minutes in each faucet so it flushes out the lines.

Once all the sinks are flushed you can proceed to open the valves to the toilets. One they valves are open let the toilet tanks fill completely. Once the tank is full, flush the toilet to make sure it is working properly.

After the toilets, you can turn the water on for each tub and shower in the house. Once all the plumbing fixtures are turned on and water is coming through the fixtures you can go and close the valve at the hose bib.

Once the system is turned on and charged you should do a walk around to check for any leaking. If you find any leaks it is a good idea to contact a licensed plumber to check the system. If there are no leaks then you can reinstall all of the faucet aerators and turn on the water heater once it is full. Voila! Your home plumbing system is now de-winterized. If anti freeze was added to the floor drains you should pour a gallon or so of water down each drain to out the anti-freeze. The anti freeze will be purged from the traps and toilet with the first use.

How to dewinterize a house

Before thinking about dewinterizing, You might wonder, “What does winterized mean?” Winterizing a home is a process where one basically prepares a house to lay dormant for the cold season. Many cottages, cabins and summer homes get winterized every year. So, learning how to dewinterize a house is important for many property owners.

How to dewinterize a house

Spring is upon us and now it’s time to dewinterize the house to prepare it for the warmer weather. Here are a couple tips to help dewinterize the house.

Dewinterizing Pipes

The main way in which houses get winterized is by preparing water pipes. Owners turn off the water in the house, empty the pipes and add traps to their sinks, faucets and drains. Occasionally, professionals will place anti-freeze in the pipes during winterizing.

Turning water on after winterizing isn’t quite as simple as it might seem. There are some basics to dewinterizing water pipes. Here are some tips for homeowners to help best prepare winterized pipes for warm weather and avoid plumbing repairs.

  • Remove Aerators from Drains and Faucets
  • Make Sure All Sink, Tub, Washing Machine and Toilet Faucets Are Off
  • Turn the Power Off if Not Already
  • Open Water Supply Valves and Water Heater Valve
  • Slowly Turn On Main Water Supply Line
  • Let Water Heater Tank Fill Before Restoring Power
  • Slowly Turn On Sinks, Tubs and Toilets Faucets
  • Check House For Leaks

It’s suggested that owners turn their water supply line back on slowly. This is one of the simplest tips to help you avoid serious issues. The process should take a minute to do. Most suggest a quarter turn every 5-10 seconds until the water is flowing at full capacity. Any faster than this will shock the pipes and likely damage the seals.

This creates leaks and that’s the last thing a house needs.

Learning how to dewinterize a house can prevent many large issues. However, even if proper methods are used to de-winterize pipes, leaks can still occur. That’s why it’s important to inspect the pipes or have someone else inspect them instead.

Inspections After Dewinterizing

Leaks lead to rot. Rot leads to house damage. House damage leads to extra expenses like plumbing repairs.

To stop this, it’s important to inspect the home after dewinterizing it. Seals dry out when not constantly wet, causing them to shrivel and shrink. Pipes that haven’t been used are more likely to burst than regularly used ones. Turning the water on slowly will help combat these problems but leaks can still occur.

Homeowners should either make sure to check these leaks themselves or hire an inspector to look for them. Having someone who knows what they’re doing will help avoid future damage to the property.

While checking for leaks, they should also look for foundation cracks and other damage.

ICleaning After Dewinterizing

Although cleaning the home should be a constant activity, doing so while dewinterizing is extra important. Winterized homes gather dust, bugs and other undesirables, It’s important to get rid of these to make the home feel nice and livable again.

There are great spring cleaning checklists out there to walk homeowners through cleaning and maintenance steps for homecare. Here’s a list of some of the tips worth doing.

  • Change the Air Filter
  • Test Carbon Dioxide and Smoke Detectors
  • Check Outside Drainage
  • Clean Gutters

Conclusion: Knowing How to Dewinterize a House is Important

Dewinterizing your home shouldn’t be a difficult process but it needs to get done. It’s important for the long-term life of the home and improperly dewinterizing a home will lead to financial headaches down the road. Do what you can do yourself and trust the experts where your abilities fall short.

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How to dewinterize a house

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  • How Do I Get a Rental House HUD-Approved?
  • How to Locate the Backwash Valve in a Swimming Pool
  • How to Estimate the Utility Cost for a New House
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When the Department of Housing and Urban Development takes possession of a home, it disconnects the utilities and, depending on the property’s location and the time of year, “winterizes” the home. Typically, this involves draining off the property’s water channels, treating the plumbing systems with plumbing antifreeze to prevent freeze damage, and emptying tanks and toilets. Depending on the home’s known condition, HUD may de-winterize the home, allowing you to conduct inspections before buying.

De-winterizing allows prospective buyers who want to inspect the property’s electrical, plumbing and other systems before closing. In California, only properties above 2,000 feet are winterized.

HUD Homes Sold As-Is

HUD homes are sold “as -is,” which means the buyer accepts the property in its current condition. HUD will not repair a property, despite its poor condition. For this reason, HUD advises all buyers to appoint a qualified home inspector to inspect the home before closing. The inspector checks to verify that the home meets local zoning and building ordinances and standards of safety. From a functional perspective, the home inspector can only test plumbing factors such as the water pressure and drain lines if the property is de-winterized.

Utility Request Form Needed

The buyer has 15 days from winning the bid to have the home professionally inspected. If he misses the inspection window, the buyer cannot inspect the home. HUD sends the buyer’s agent a utility activation request form, which authorizes HUD to turn on the utilities for three consecutive days within the 15-day inspection window. For winterized properties, the buyer must specifically request de-winterization when he returns the utility request form. HUD then de-winterizes the property and connects the utilities to facilitate the home inspection.

De-Winterizing for Plumbing Inspection

De-winterizing a property reverses the winterizing process. Primarily, it reactivates the plumbing system so the home inspector can inspect for leaks. Faucets are prepared for water flow by removing the aerators, which allows debris to drain from the system. Appliances such as refrigerators, washing machines and dishwashers are reconnected to the water supply, including water heaters. Supply valves are opened and, as the water is turned back on, checked for leaks.

Paying for De-Winterizing After Inspection

When the buyer completes his inspection, HUD re-winterizes the property. The buyer pays for this service up-front by sending a check with the utility request form. Fees vary, depending on the size of the home and how it is heated. The money is non-refundable, even if the sale falls through. After closing, the buyer becomes responsible for permanently de-winterizing the home and activating the utilities ready for moving in.

When HUD Will Not De-Winterize

HUD inspects properties before listing, and includes with the listing a Property Condition Report that indicates the property’s overall condition. Known plumbing leaks and deficiencies are noted on the report. HUD will not de-winterize for inspection any home with a recognized plumbing fault. Buyers who bid on such properties do so in the full knowledge that a problem exists, and the buyer is responsible for fixing it after the close of escrow. Generally, the price reflects the condition of the property.

  • Invest Four More: The Investors Guide to Purchasing HUD Homes
  • Aspec Residential Services: De-Winterizing Your Home

A former real estate lawyer, Jayne Thompson writes about law, business and corporate communications, drawing on 17 years’ experience in the legal sector. She holds a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Birmingham and a Masters in International Law from the University of East London.

How to dewinterize a house

Buying a home from a bank after the foreclosure auction can be very lucrative. And by buying a foreclosed property, you are performing an important function in helping stabilize the real estate market in general as well as the neighborhood in which the home is located.

But REO home sales carry a hidden problem for prospective purchasers: the properties frequently have been “winterized” to protect them from the cold Massachusetts weather.

How to dewinterize a house

If you’ve ever seen a home that has had burst pipes, you know the terrible damage water can cause to a structure.

How to dewinterize a house

Where a water pipe bursts on an upper floor, the water damage quickly spreads. Ceilings on lower levels collapse, walls sprout mold, wood floors buckle – whole sections of a structure must be gutted if water runs unabated for even one day. It’s easy to run up repair bills of $50,000 and more.

How to dewinterize a house

That’s why lenders which foreclose on properties during the cold winter months in MA will “winterize” the structure immediately upon taking title at the auction.

They turn off the utilities, drain all pipes and often add anti-freeze. Sometimes electrical service is left on, but everything else is turned off, disabled and drained.

This creates a lot of challenges for the post-foreclosure marketing and sale of REO homes.

It’s impossible for buyers to do a full home inspection of a winterized home.

“Dry” inspections are easily done, but there’s no way to judge the functioning and condition of the home’s heating and plumbing systems. You just assume the risk of undiscovered problems with mechanical systems if you buy a home with only a “dry” home inspection.

Buyers may get the REO lender’s OK to pay to dewinterize the structure for a home inspection, but the buyer will also have to foot the bill to re-winterize the place after the inspection is done. Together, the dewinterize/rewinterize process can cost well over $1,000.

You can say everything is negotiable and seek to get the REO lender to pay to dewinterize and rewinterize a property.

Some REO lenders will pay at least part of the dewinterize/rewinterize costs. But communications with REO lenders (or their 3rd party asset management company) are notoriously slow and difficult. Many buyers give up on a REO purchase in frustration after lots of lost time.

How to dewinterize a house

Related Articles

  • Getting Your House Fumigated
  • How Do I Get a Rental House HUD-Approved?
  • How to Locate the Backwash Valve in a Swimming Pool
  • How to Estimate the Utility Cost for a New House
  • Residential Water Drainage Techniques

When the Department of Housing and Urban Development takes possession of a home, it disconnects the utilities and, depending on the property’s location and the time of year, “winterizes” the home. Typically, this involves draining off the property’s water channels, treating the plumbing systems with plumbing antifreeze to prevent freeze damage, and emptying tanks and toilets. Depending on the home’s known condition, HUD may de-winterize the home, allowing you to conduct inspections before buying.

De-winterizing allows prospective buyers who want to inspect the property’s electrical, plumbing and other systems before closing. In California, only properties above 2,000 feet are winterized.

HUD Homes Sold As-Is

HUD homes are sold “as -is,” which means the buyer accepts the property in its current condition. HUD will not repair a property, despite its poor condition. For this reason, HUD advises all buyers to appoint a qualified home inspector to inspect the home before closing. The inspector checks to verify that the home meets local zoning and building ordinances and standards of safety. From a functional perspective, the home inspector can only test plumbing factors such as the water pressure and drain lines if the property is de-winterized.

Utility Request Form Needed

The buyer has 15 days from winning the bid to have the home professionally inspected. If he misses the inspection window, the buyer cannot inspect the home. HUD sends the buyer’s agent a utility activation request form, which authorizes HUD to turn on the utilities for three consecutive days within the 15-day inspection window. For winterized properties, the buyer must specifically request de-winterization when he returns the utility request form. HUD then de-winterizes the property and connects the utilities to facilitate the home inspection.

De-Winterizing for Plumbing Inspection

De-winterizing a property reverses the winterizing process. Primarily, it reactivates the plumbing system so the home inspector can inspect for leaks. Faucets are prepared for water flow by removing the aerators, which allows debris to drain from the system. Appliances such as refrigerators, washing machines and dishwashers are reconnected to the water supply, including water heaters. Supply valves are opened and, as the water is turned back on, checked for leaks.

Paying for De-Winterizing After Inspection

When the buyer completes his inspection, HUD re-winterizes the property. The buyer pays for this service up-front by sending a check with the utility request form. Fees vary, depending on the size of the home and how it is heated. The money is non-refundable, even if the sale falls through. After closing, the buyer becomes responsible for permanently de-winterizing the home and activating the utilities ready for moving in.

When HUD Will Not De-Winterize

HUD inspects properties before listing, and includes with the listing a Property Condition Report that indicates the property’s overall condition. Known plumbing leaks and deficiencies are noted on the report. HUD will not de-winterize for inspection any home with a recognized plumbing fault. Buyers who bid on such properties do so in the full knowledge that a problem exists, and the buyer is responsible for fixing it after the close of escrow. Generally, the price reflects the condition of the property.

  • Invest Four More: The Investors Guide to Purchasing HUD Homes
  • Aspec Residential Services: De-Winterizing Your Home

A former real estate lawyer, Jayne Thompson writes about law, business and corporate communications, drawing on 17 years’ experience in the legal sector. She holds a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Birmingham and a Masters in International Law from the University of East London.