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How to eat pancakes

How to eat pancakes

FNK_Pancakes

Photo by: Tara Donne ©Food Network: 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Tara Donne, Food Network: 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Ah, pancakes. Glorious pancakes. Whether you stuff them with chocolate chips, drown them in maple syrup or bury them in a wintry pile of powdered sugar, pancakes are a downright indulgent, endlessly customizable and filling breakfast favorite — so filling, in fact, that you might consider enjoying them at a time of day when your appetite is a little more stoked.

Give “breakfast for dinner” new meaning by filling your supper plate with flapjacks, and check that guilt at the door when pilling on the toppings — it’s dinner, after all.

Pancakes (pictured above)

Start with a classic stack. Nutmeg adds a hint of spice to these straight-up pancakes that are meant to be speckled with the filling of your choosing (or keep them plain to appreciate their cakey glory). Serve with plenty of maple syrup for the authentic experience.

How to eat pancakes

CHOCOLATEBANANA PANCAKE BREAKFAST CASSEROLE Food Network Kitchen Unsalted Butter, Allpurpose Flour, Sugar, Baking Powder, Baking Soda, Buttermilk, Eggs, HalfandHalf, Vanilla Extract, Bananas, Semisweet Chocolate Chips, Confectioners’ Sugar

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

The genius of this Chocolate-Banana Pancake Breakfast Casserole is that the banana slices and chocolate chips are added in between shingled pancakes along with a creamy egg custard. The pancakes themselves are pure fluff — unmarred by fillings — but they sandwich a bevy of melty toppings. It’s the best of both worlds.

How to eat pancakes

FNK_HotcakesWithDeliciousBlueberryCompote_H

Chef Name: Food Network Kitchen Full Recipe Name: Hotcakes with Delicious Blueberry Compote Talent Recipe: FNK Recipe: Food Networks Kitchen’s Hotcakes with Delicious Blueberry Compote, as seen on Foodnetwork.com Project: Foodnetwork.com, HOLIDAY/SUPER BOWL/COMFORT/HEALTHY Show Name: Food Network / Cooking Channel: Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, 2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

The star of this show is the blueberry compote spooned over the ricotta-filled hotcakes. Lemon zest and sugar add brightness and zing to the syrupy topping. Make sure to watch the berries so they don’t become too mushy and lose their beautiful shape.

How to eat pancakes

CINNAMONPECAN PANCAKE BREAKFAST CASSEROLE Food Network Kitchen Unsalted Butter, Allpurpose Flour, Baking Powder, Baking Soda, Sugar, Buttermilk, Eggs, HalfandHalf, Vanilla Extract, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Maple Syrup, Pecans

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Much like its chocolate-banana sister, this pancake casserole starts with plain pancakes that are then stacked with a cinnamon-spiked custard. A quickly simmered pecan-maple syrup drives home the Southern twinge these pancakes possess.

How to eat pancakes

MelissadArabian_ChocolateChocolateVeggiePancakes_H1

Chef Name: Melissa d’Arabian Full Recipe Name: Chocolate-Chocolate Veggie Pancakes Talent Recipe: Melissa d’Arabian’s Chocolate-Chocolate Veggie Pancakes, as seen on Ten Dollar Dinners FNK Recipe: Project: Foodnetwork.com, Back to School/Sandwich Central/Dinner and a Movie/Sides Show Name: Ten Dollar Dinners Food Network / Cooking Channel: Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, 2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

If you’re trying to sneak vegetables into your little ones’ diets (or maybe just your own), these masters of disguise are your ticket to eating well. Carrots, spinach and apples are blended (along with yogurt, oats, cocoa, milk, honey and vanilla) before being mixed with the rest of the pancake ingredients and chocolate chips. Once they’re cooked, you’d never know the nutritional power these puppies are packing.

How to eat pancakes

FNK_Pancakes

Photo by: Tara Donne ©Food Network: 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Tara Donne, Food Network: 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Ah, pancakes. Glorious pancakes. Whether you stuff them with chocolate chips, drown them in maple syrup or bury them in a wintry pile of powdered sugar, pancakes are a downright indulgent, endlessly customizable and filling breakfast favorite — so filling, in fact, that you might consider enjoying them at a time of day when your appetite is a little more stoked.

Give “breakfast for dinner” new meaning by filling your supper plate with flapjacks, and check that guilt at the door when pilling on the toppings — it’s dinner, after all.

Start with a classic stack (shown above). Nutmeg adds a hint of spice to these straight-up pancakes that are meant to be speckled with the filling of your choosing (or keep them plain to appreciate their cakey glory). Serve with plenty of maple syrup for the authentic experience.

How to eat pancakes

CHOCOLATEBANANA PANCAKE BREAKFAST CASSEROLE Food Network Kitchen Unsalted Butter, Allpurpose Flour, Sugar, Baking Powder, Baking Soda, Buttermilk, Eggs, HalfandHalf, Vanilla Extract, Bananas, Semisweet Chocolate Chips, Confectioners’ Sugar

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

The genius of this Chocolate-Banana Pancake Breakfast Casserole is that the banana slices and chocolate chips are added in between shingled pancakes along with a creamy egg custard. The pancakes themselves are pure fluff — unmarred by fillings — but they sandwich a bevy of melty toppings. It’s the best of both worlds.

How to eat pancakes

FNK_HotcakesWithDeliciousBlueberryCompote_H

Chef Name: Food Network Kitchen Full Recipe Name: Hotcakes with Delicious Blueberry Compote Talent Recipe: FNK Recipe: Food Networks Kitchen’s Hotcakes with Delicious Blueberry Compote, as seen on Foodnetwork.com Project: Foodnetwork.com, HOLIDAY/SUPER BOWL/COMFORT/HEALTHY Show Name: Food Network / Cooking Channel: Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, 2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

The star of this show is the blueberry compote spooned over the ricotta-filled hotcakes. Lemon zest and sugar add brightness and zing to the syrupy topping. Make sure to watch the berries so they don’t become too mushy and lose their beautiful shape.

How to eat pancakes

CINNAMONPECAN PANCAKE BREAKFAST CASSEROLE Food Network Kitchen Unsalted Butter, Allpurpose Flour, Baking Powder, Baking Soda, Sugar, Buttermilk, Eggs, HalfandHalf, Vanilla Extract, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Maple Syrup, Pecans

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Much like its chocolate-banana sister, this pancake casserole starts with plain pancakes that are then stacked with a cinnamon-spiked custard. A quickly simmered pecan-maple syrup drives home the Southern twinge these pancakes possess.

How to eat pancakes

MelissadArabian_ChocolateChocolateVeggiePancakes_H1

Chef Name: Melissa d’Arabian Full Recipe Name: Chocolate-Chocolate Veggie Pancakes Talent Recipe: Melissa d’Arabian’s Chocolate-Chocolate Veggie Pancakes, as seen on Ten Dollar Dinners FNK Recipe: Project: Foodnetwork.com, Back to School/Sandwich Central/Dinner and a Movie/Sides Show Name: Ten Dollar Dinners Food Network / Cooking Channel: Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, 2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

If you’re trying to sneak vegetables into your little ones’ diets (or maybe just your own), these masters of disguise are your ticket to eating well. Carrots, spinach and apples are blended (along with yogurt, oats, cocoa, milk, honey and vanilla) before being mixed with the rest of the pancake ingredients and chocolate chips. Once they’re cooked, you’d never know the nutritional power these puppies are packing.

The other day my partner was kind enough to make breakfast for us: Gluten-free pumpkin pancakes from Trader Joe’s. As we sat down to eat, I instinctively cut up all the pancakes on my plate into bite-size pieces and then started eating them. “Do you always cut up your pancakes before you eat them?” she asked. I hadn’t considered it, but after a moment’s thought, I decided, yes, I do tend to pre-cut my pancakes, and most sweet, carbohydrate-rich breakfast items for that matter, before I start eating them. My partner, I noticed, only cut the bite she was about to eat.

Because I can’t let even the most inane breakfast-related question—whether bagels should have seeds on both sides, for instance—go unanalyzed, this idea haunted me the rest of the day. What’s proper, I wondered, the pre-cut technique or cutting as you go? Finally, I decided to investigate.

To start, I emailed etiquette expert Myka Meier, the founder of Beaumont Etiquette. She set me straight right away. “The correct dining etiquette is to cut one piece at a time. You should only cut the one piece you are about to eat, and it is incorrect to cut multiple bites and then eat,” she said.

“It’s to keep you eating at a slower pace,” she said. “Most people eat very fast, so taking breaks after every four bites will help tremendously.”

While I respected Meier’s expertise, I wasn’t done searching. Etiquette, after all, is subjective. I wanted some hard data on the matter, so I wrote to my friend Dom Ciruzzi, a PhD student in geological engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and re-framed my question. This time, I wanted to know about heat. If you pre-cut your pancakes, I asked, will they get colder faster?

“Omg I actually know how I could mathematically solve this,” he said. “What an interesting question! I’ll get back to you soonish with a detailed response.”

A few days later, he sent me a super legitimate PowerPoint entitled “Heat transfer through cut and non-cut pancakes.” I eagerly read the results.

Ciruzzi created numerical models simulating two theoretical pancakes—one whose cut up pieces were separated by approximately one centimeter, and one that was left uncut—and looked at how their density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity would affect their heat loss over time.

The results left no room for doubt: Cutting as you go ensures hotter pancakes. After ten minutes, the fully intact pancake would cool 15 degrees. When it came to the cut pancake, however, the outside pieces cooled more quickly than the inner pieces. After ten minutes, he found, the outer pieces would cool 19 degrees, while the inner pieces would cool about 15 degrees.

“I would say that if overall you want to have hotter pancakes throughout your meal, then cut as you go. But if you’re guilty of pre-cutting and you want to strategically eat hotter pancakes, eat from the outside in,” he said.

I think of pre-cutting, then, as a more innocent way to eat a pancake—a throwback to a simpler time in our lives, before the world gets to us with its science and etiquette, its pesky rules and facts.

Alas, it seemed that both the laws of science and etiquette dictate that I shouldn’t pre-cut my pancakes. But after looking at all the evidence, I’ve decided to keep doing it anyway. Why? Quite frankly, honey badger don’t care, and I also now have my own self-serving logic to justify my choice.

Breakfast, for me, is all about leisure. That’s why I don’t get coffee to-go if I can at all help it—I like to sit down with it and enjoy it—and why I like to eat reclining when possible, as though it’s Passover everyday and I’m celebrating escaping ancient Egypt.

So when it comes to pancakes, I want to get all the hard work done as soon as possible. Pre-cutting allows me to put my knife to the side for the rest of the meal and get to the good stuff without having to continuously perform the laborious task of carving up my next bite. The result is a generally more relaxing and pleasurable experience.

All of us, moreover, are brought into this world as pre-cutters. As children, before we can cut, our parents carve up our pancakes for us and then let us eat them with our gross, sticky hands at our own pace.

I think of pre-cutting, then, as a more innocent way to eat a pancake—a throwback to a simpler time in our lives, before the world gets to us with its science and etiquette, its pesky rules and facts.

Now when I pre-cut my pancake, I imagine I am that sticky, helpless, happy child and remember all that unselfconscious joy once more. It’s not the worst way to start the day.

makes: 4 – 6
Skill: easy
Cost: cheap
Prep: 5 min
Cooking: 10 min

Nutrition per portion

These simple breakfast pancakes are a weekend staple, perfect for covering with your favourite toppings.

Whether you’re a fan of bacon and maple syrup or berries and yogurt, this classic pancake recipe has to be a go-to for a Sunday brunch. Made with just five ingredients that you’ll likely have in your cupboard and fridge already, they’re great for whipping up when you want something a little more special. And ready in just 15 minutes, they’re so quick to make that brunch just becomes a breeze. We’ve gone for a savoury dish with our recipe, complete with bacon, mushroom, and spinach.

Ingredients

  • For the pancakes:
  • 90g plain flour
  • 1½ level tsp baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 3 med eggs
  • 100ml skimmed milk
  • Spray oil
  • For the topping:
  • 2 bacon medallions
  • 100g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • 175g cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1-2 tbsp freshly shredded basil
  • Salt and ground black pepper

Method

To make the pancakes : tip the flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl. Break 1 egg into the milk and mix. Gradually whisk into the flour to give a smooth batter.

Heat a non-stick frying pan and spray lightly with oil. Drop 3-4 dessertspoonfuls of the mixture into the pan and spread out to give rounds about 7cm in diameter. Cook for 1-2 mins, then turn them over and cook for 1- 2 mins more, until lightly golden on both sides. Remove from the pan and cook the remaining mixture, keeping the first batch warm.

Spray oil in the pan and cook the bacon for 1-2 mins on both sides. Push to one side of the pan and add 1 spray of oil to the clear area. Add the mushrooms and cook for 1-2 mins. Add the tomatoes and cook until they start to soften, then stir in the basil and seasoning.

Poach the remaining 2 eggs. Divide the pancakes between 2 plates and top each with a piece of bacon. Spoon on the tomato and mushroom mixture and top with poached eggs. Grind over a little black pepper and serve.

T0p tips for making breakfast pancakes:

For an additional treat, throw in some chocolate chips into your mixture before it goes into the pan. They’ll melt in the cooking process and give you an extra-chocolatey delight.

How to eat pancakes

It’s Pancake Day on Tuesday 28 th February, and you’re probably already planning to spend breakfast, lunch and dinner indulging in this British tradition.

One reason Pancake Day is so popular, beyond the fact pancakes are delicious, is they’re a brilliantly adaptable dish. Sweet or savoury, healthy or indulgent, pancakes can be made to delight even the most particular palate.

According to a recent survey we conducted of 2,000 Brits, the majority of the UK will be eating three pancakes this Pancake Day, though 5% of us will indulge in a pile of eight!

Seeing as you may be having a few, we thought we’d offer some of our favourite pancake recipes and toppings to give you some variety, and take the next taste level. Bon appetite.

Pancakes: A global phenomenon

How to eat pancakes

Every region has its own twist on the pancake. Some are sweet, others are savoury; but undoubtedly, all are delicious.

There’s the thick and fluffy American buttermilk pancakes; delicate French crêpes; bitesize blinis from Eastern Europe; adaptable Japanese okonomiyaki; shareable soufflé pannenkoeken from the Netherlands; the spicy Indian uttapam, and many more in between.

Classic English pancake recipe

Stuck for choice? You can’t go wrong with a classic English pancake, which serves as a great foundation to most other pancake recipes:

  • 300ml milk
  • 100g plain flour
  • 2 eggs

Combine your ingredients in a wide jug or bowl, whisking into a smooth batter. Lightly oil a frying pan, and pour one ladle of mixture into the hot (but not smoking) pan. Cook on each side for one minute.

It’s really that simple! The English pancake is generally unseasoned, as it’s designed to work as a simple base for your toppings, which can be sweet or savoury.

American pancake recipe

How to eat pancakes

For a sweet breakfast-style pancake, try out iconic thick and fluffy American pancakes.

  • 130ml milk
  • 135g plain flour
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp melted butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp baking powder

Mix together the dry ingredients in a bowl, and whisk the wet ingredients in a jug. Combine the wet with the dry, and whisk until you have a smooth batter. Pour one ladle of the batter into a hot, oiled pan, and cook until bubbles appear on the surface. Flip and continue cooking until golden brown.

The baking powder helps to add the much-loved fluffy depth to these pancakes, and the sugar makes them perfect for a sweet breakfast. Nothing beats a stack of these pancakes, served fresh from the pan to get your day started in the best possible way.

Healthy pancake recipe

How to eat pancakes

Naturally, buttery pancakes aren’t the healthiest treat, so if you’re looking to keep your calorie count low, consider this super simple healthy pancake recipe as an alternative.

  • 1 ripe banana
  • 2 eggs, whisked

Mash the banana in a bowl, and mix in the eggs. Heat a pan with low-calorie oil scoop a ladle of batter into the pan. Fry on either side until golden.

These simple healthy pancakes are high in protein to give you plenty of energy, and can be tolerated by most allergy sufferers. You can add all sorts of ingredients to them, including baking powder for a fluffier finish, cocoa powder for a chocolatey twist, or granola for a crunchy bite.

Pancake toppings: What’s your favourite?

How to eat pancakes

To many, a pancake is nothing without toppings. Much like the style of pancake, every culture has its own favourite toppings that perfectly compliment the doughy cake.

North American pancakes are synonymous with maple syrup and crispy bacon, or filled to bursting with fresh blueberries. French crêpes can be served with a fancy orange Curaçao liquor and orange peel (known as crepe Suzette), or a simple dusting of icing sugar.

But what about the classic British pancake that many tuck into on Pancake Day in the UK? Lemon and sugar is perhaps the best-known topping, but has the British palate turned away from this simple, sour treat?

According to our survey, pancake tradition is strong in the British Isles. Our research uncovered lemon and sugar is Britain’s favourite topping: 43% of respondents named it their number-one choice.

Other popular toppings included chocolate spread at 10%, golden syrup with 8% of the vote, Canadian classic maple syrup got 7%, while ice cream had 5%.

Fancy a twist on these classic toppings? These tried and tested ideas may get your mouth watering:

  • A twist on lemon and sugar

Add raspberries for an extra layer of tangy sweetness, or grate lemon zest into the batter, and top with whipped lemon ricotta for an impressive dinner party dessert.

  • Seriously good chocolate spread

Melt dark chocolate and white chocolate together and drizzle over strawberries for a seriously indulgent pancake stack.

  • Oat-ily delicious golden syrup

This sticky treat is a common ingredient in flapjacks, so couple it with oat pancakes or add a sprinkle of granola to your topping for a crunchy finish.

  • Maple syrup: Fruits of the forest

Fresh dark forest fruits, such as blackberries and cherries, work perfectly with maple syrup-soaked pancakes, as do walnuts for a smoky flavour.

  • Bittersweet ice cream

Enjoy a spin on the classic ice cream sundae by making banana pancakes topped with a scoop of ice cream and whipped cream, or enjoy an adult twist with coffee flavoured pancakes and Irish cream ice cream.

Armed with our tips, you should have enough variety to enjoy a different taste sensation with every one – whether you have three, or eight! Whatever way you like your pancakes, we hope you and the rest of the family enjoy Pancake Day on Tuesday 28 th February.

How to eat pancakes

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Pancakes are a staple breakfast item—especially on the weekends when you have time to go out for brunch or host a gathering at your place. However, making them your top breakfast option on a regular basis could cause you to feel a number of undesired symptoms.

Below, you’ll see just a few of these side effects as well as one potential benefit. After, be sure to read The One Breakfast Food To Eat To Lower Your Cholesterol, Says Dietitian!

You may become bloated.

If pancakes make you bloated, it’s possible that you’re dealing with a gluten sensitivity. Remember, traditional buttermilk pancakes are high in refined wheat flour, which contains the protein gluten. If you find yourself getting majorly bloated after eating a small stack of pancakes, it’s possible that you are unable to properly digest the protein. Consider trying a gluten-free mix instead, such as Bob’s Red Mill gluten-free pancake mix. The texture is fluffy and tastes just like the real thing!

You may consume your day’s worth of added sugars.

Is your go-to breakfast a stack of pancakes? If it is, then it’s very likely that you’re consuming all of the recommended daily allowance of sugar in one sitting. One serving, or two tablespoons of Mrs. Butterworth’s Regular Syrup, contains a whopping 22 grams of sugar. We can bet you’re putting more than just two tablespoons of syrup overtop your flapjacks, which means you could be consuming well over the recommended consumption of sugar—and all before lunch. 6254a4d1642c605c54bf1cab17d50f1e

For context, the American Heart Association says that women consume no more than 25 grams or 6 teaspoons of added sugars daily to maintain good heart health. For men, the recommended cap is 36 grams or 9 teaspoons.

You may feel like you need a nap.

The thing about sugar is that, while it will initially give you a surge of energy, a crash will shortly follow. That’s because consuming all of that sugar will cause your blood sugar levels to abruptly spike, which inevitably leads to a dramatic fall. It largely has to do with the glycemic index of certain foods. For example, sucrose has a high glycemic index as does white flour. This crash may cause you to feel sluggish like you need to lie down and take a little nap.

They could give you a boost in fiber.

If you make pancakes using whole wheat flour or even better, with oat flour, this could help you boost your fiber intake. In part, this can also help you become more regular. Another bonus of oat flour? It contains a specific type of fiber called beta-glucan, which has been shown to help people with diabetes decrease their blood sugar levels.

How to eat pancakesPancake day is one of my favourite days and is celebrated every year on the Tuesday before Lent, known as Shrove Tuesday.

It was historically a pagan holiday that honoured the arrival of the new season of spring.

The reason we eat pancakes is because eggs and milk were usually used up before the 40 day fast for Lent began and what better food to make than pancakes!

Pancakes have evolved since then and you can have thin ones, fat ones, sweet ones and savoury ones. You can also top them with various different sauces and fruits amongst other ingredients.

A simple pancake recipe is as follows:

Ingredients:

  • 100 grams plain flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 300ml milk
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • pinch of salt
  • pinch of cinnamon

Method:

  1. In a large bowl, sift in the flour, cinnamon and salt and make a well in the middle.
  2. Crack the eggs in the middle and pour in approximately 50ml of the milk and the oil.
  3. Start whisking the mixture as it turns into batter whilst slowly pouring in the rest of the milk.
  4. Once it is really smooth, heat a lightly greased crepe pan on medium heat.
  5. Pour in some batter and spread out evenly.
  6. Once it turns golden (less than a minute), flip over.
  7. Continue doing the same till you have made a batch.

My favourite ways to eat pancakes are topped with:

  1. Sugar and lemon. Simple and scrumptious.
  2. Bananas and Nutella. Match made in heaven.
  3. Salted caramel sauce. Need I say more?
  4. Blueberries and strawberries
  5. Drizzled with maple syrup.

What are your favourite ways to eat pancakes?

With one week to go until Shrove Tuesday, we take a look at the origins of eating pancakes on the day, as well as some suggestions of what you can have on them!

Shrove Tuesday – also known widely as Pancake Day – takes place before the first day of Lent.

Lent represents the 40-day period Jesus spent fasting in the desert, but Sundays are not included in the count.

To that end, Shrove Tuesday arrives exactly 47 days before Easter Sunday and the event is celebrated in many Christian countries.

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With Lent still recognised as a time of fasting and sacrifice for some, pancakes are usually associated with the date as a way to use up eggs, milk and sugar before switching to simpler foods.

This year’s Shrove Tuesday is on March 1, with Ash Wednesday – and the period of Lent – beginning on March 2.

Easter Sunday is this year on Sunday, April 17.

In modern times Pancake Day is now celebrated as a treat for many families, regardless of religion or tradition.

With a week to go, we turned to the readers to find some of the most popular and tasty toppings to have on your pancakes.

Here are some of their favourite suggestions for your pancake tea on Tuesday, March 1.

Bacon and syrup: Increasingly popular in recent years, enjoy your pancakes with an American twist and combine sweet and salty.

Chocolate: Whether you go for chocolate sauce or melt down your favourite chocolate bar for on top, this is a big winner.

Fruit and cream: Fruit make it sort-of healthy, right? From bananas to berries, whip up some cream and top with your favourite fruit for a sweet end to the meal.

Golden or maple syrup: It’s a sugar overload, but well worth it as a rare treat.

Ham and cheese: No sweet tooth? A pinch of salt and some savoury ingredients will sort that.

Jam: A splodge of your favourite flavour and your pancake is ready to eat!

Time to test out your pancake flipping skills

t’s almost Pancake Day, which means we now officially have an excuse to eat as many pancakes as we want.

Shrove Tuesday, as it’s more formally known, is the perfect reason to get your friends and family round for stacks of delicious pancakes.

Whilst some people’s pancake flipping skills are better than others, any pancake fanatic knows no matter what they taste like, it’s all about the toppings.

Some people like to go fancy with fresh berries and cream or keep it simple with lemon and sugar.

Whatever your pancake preference, what could be better than an entire day dedicated to them?

Here’s everything you need to know about Pancake Day, otherwise known as Shrove Tuesday:

When is Pancake Day?

Every year the city of London turns into a pancake haven with restaurants and homes cooking up delightful variations of the highly addictive batter cakes and crêpes. However, given that this day changes date every year according to Easter, it can be hard to remember when it is, and why exactly we celebrate it.

This year, Shrove Tuesday falls on 1 March.

Why do we celebrate Pancake Day?

For Christians, Shrove Tuesday marks the last day before Lent, traditionally a period of abstinence, associated with clearing your cupboards of goods such as sugar, fats and eggs.

Traditionally, pancakes were eaten on this day to use up these foods before the 40-day fasting season of Lent began. Some believe the four ingredients used in pancakes may actually represent the four pillars of the Christian faith – flour as ‘the staff of life’, eggs as ‘creation’, milk as ‘purity’ and salt as ‘wholesomeness’.

Although the day is important in Christian tradition, Pancake Day is widely celebrated by those outside of the faith.

What does Shrove Tuesday mean?

The word ‘shrove’ derives from the English word ‘shrive’, which means “to obtain absolution for one’s sins by way of confession and penance”. The day gets its unique name from the custom for Christians to be ‘shriven’ before the start of Lent. They would be called to confession by the ring of a bell which came to be known as the ‘pancake bell’ and it is still rung in some churches today.

Why do we flip pancakes?

The pancake has a very long history and is featured in cookery books as far back as 1439. The tradition of tossing or flipping them is almost as old. According to legend, the tradition was born in the 15th century when a woman in Buckinghamshire rushed to church to confess her sins while mid-way through making pancakes.

Need some Pancake Day inspiration?

Check out these varied foodstagrams.

And here are some great recipes to try at home, from savoury blinis with smoked salmon to millefeuille crepe cakes.

All the pancake recipes you need for Pancake Day 2022, including sweet and savoury toppings from classic lemon & sugar crêpes to rainbow pancakes.

Try these pancake day recipes, then check out our main collection of savoury crêpe recipes and egg-free pancake recipes.

Read our review of the best pancake pans we’ve tested, to find the perfect one for you. Plus, see how to flip a pancake.

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How to eat pancakes

Fluffy American pancakes with cherry-berry syrup

You’ll flip over these next level fluffy American pancakes – the perfect indulgent brunch treat. Serve with our tangy cherry syrup and irresistible maple syrup and bacon

How to eat pancakes

Red velvet pancakes

New York diner-style chocolate pancakes meet red velvet cake in this ingenious brunch dish, stacked up with a sweet maple cream cheese frosting, chocolate chips and fresh blueberries.

How to eat pancakes

American blueberry pancakes

Light, fluffy and fruity, these pancakes are an American classic. Serve them stacked high with syrup and extra fruit

How to eat pancakes

Mix & match pancake muffins

Forget standing over a hob flipping pancakes on Pancake Day – make these fluffy pancake muffins, or ‘puffins’, instead. Serve them warm with maple syrup

How to eat pancakes

Cinnamon roll pancakes

Serve these cinnamon roll pancakes for breakfast or brunch with caramel yogurt and maple syrup. They also make an inspired dessert for Pancake Day

How to eat pancakes

Easy banana pancakes

Turn overripe, blackened bananas into sweet and fluffy American-style pancakes. Serve with syrup and crunchy, toasted pecan nuts as a delicious brunch treat

How to eat pancakes

Chocolate pancakes

Start your morning with these indulgent chocolate pancakes. Top with cream and berries, if you like – they’re also great for dessert

How to eat pancakes

Blueberry cheesecake pancakes

Try these moreish blueberry cheesecake pancakes on Shrove Tuesday, they’ll go down a storm with the family. They also make a lovely dessert all year round

How to eat pancakes

Buckwheat crêpe madames

Enjoy these buckwheat pancakes with eggs, cheese and ham for breakfast or brunch. They’re good for Pancake Day or something different at the weekend

How to eat pancakes

Chocolate-filled pancakes with caramelised banana

These fluffy, American-style pancakes have a hidden chocolatey centre and soak up the maple syrup like sponges

How to eat pancakes

Easy vegan pancakes

Make this great base for vegan pancakes: use your favourite plant-based milk, and add vegan choc chips, blueberries, or anything else you fancy

How to eat pancakes

Lemon drizzle pancakes

Indulge in a stack of our ultra-indulgent lemon drizzle pancakes, inspired by our favourite classic bake. These are a guaranteed crowd-pleaser

How to eat pancakes

Brunch pancake sharing board

Our sharing board makes a great brunch treat for the weekend. Make the pancakes and bacon ahead and keep warm while you assemble everything else. You can also improvise with seasonal ingredients

How to eat pancakes

Spinach & ricotta pancake bake

Make pancakes on Shrove Tuesday and serve our spinach and ricotta pancake bake for dinner. For dessert, choose one of our sweet pancake recipes

How to eat pancakes

Almond flour pancakes

Serve these gluten-free pancakes with berries and syrup, if you like. If you can’t get hold of almond flour, blitz ground almonds until fine

How to eat pancakes

Today is the most glorious Tuesday of all.

We’re given free rein to piles our plates high with thin crepes or thick pancakes, slathering them with a selection of sweet and savoury spreads and toppings. It’s a truly joyous occasion. But have you ever stopped, mid-chew, to wonder why we eat pancakes every Spring?

Let us bring you up to speed on the religious tradition of eating pancakes and give you the lowdown on lent.

When is pancake day?
Pancake Tuesday, more formally known as Shrove Tuesday, is always followed by Ash Wednesday, which is the beginning of Lent whereby Christians traditionally fast for 40 days.

This year, the food-filled day falls on Tuesday, 1 March.

How to eat pancakes

What is Shrove Tuesday?
Easter is one of the oldest festivals of the Christian Church and celebrates the resurrection of Jesus from the tomb on the third day after his crucifixion.

However, before any celebrations can begin, there must be a period of fasting which is where Shrove Tuesday comes into play. The word shrove comes from shrive, meaning to present oneself for confession, penance, and absolution.

Shrove Tuesday marks the last day before Lent – a period of 40 days whereby Christians traditionally fast or give up certain foods. The 40 days represent the time that Jesus spent fasting in the desert where he resisted the temptation of Satan.

On the first day of Lent, also known as Ash Wednesday, Christians would traditionally attend mass to have a small cross of ashes drawn on their forehead by the priest. The cross is in reference to the Biblical passage “For dust you are and to dust you shall return” (Genesis 3:19).

Why pancakes?
In the past, families would traditionally prepare to fast by using up all the ingredients in their kitchen. These would usually consist of eggs, milk, and flour – everything you need to make a good pancake!

How to make the perfect pancake
We have listed three decadently delicious pancake recipes for you to try out this Pancake Tuesday.

How to eat pancakesAmerican Style Pancakes

How to eat pancakesPaul’s Perfect Pancakes

How to eat pancakesGluten-Free Pancakes

Flipping pancakes
In the 1980s, RTÉ held both a Pancake Flipping Olympics and a Pancake Relay Road Race.

Click here to watch RTÉ Archives footage of Marty Whelan, Tony Fenton, Barry Lang and Ian Dempsey taking part.

How to eat pancakesPancake Rally Road Race

I have what critics are calling A Sugar Problem. Most days, I can happily eat sweets for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, as long as I sneak in a little protein here and there. Here is my problem: I like a sugary midday meal, which you’d think would make me a natural on the brunch scene. But I don’t really like fancy brunches—I’d rather run for the bathroom in the comfort of my own home without paying $45 for a bottle of Korbel Brut and an overworked Benedict. Plus, I don’t want to wait until 11 a.m. to eat ONE meal. I want to wake up, eat my sweet breakfast, and then eat my sweet lunch. So how do I get away with eating sweets for lunch without being pigeonholed into brunchery? Enter: the lunch pancake.

I eat pancakes for lunch up to three times a week. Not brunch. Lunch. Meaning pancakes are my second meal of the day. It’s not as labor-intensive as it sounds; I don’t usually feel like mixing ingredients in the middle of the workday, so I use a pre-made buttermilk flapjack mix from Kodiak Cakes . The brand is known for its “power cakes,” which pack a whopping 14 grams of protein per serving. One serving is only 190 calories (roughly two measly cakes), so I double it for my midday meal. They’re fun to eat, they’re just sweet enough, and they usually keep me pretty full until dinner.

Turns out, pancakes have been a hearty source of nutrition since man first pounded his chest and shrieked “griddle!” According to National Geographic , analyses of starch grains on 30,000-year-old grinding tools suggest that Stone Age cooks made batter out of cattails and ferns, then baked it on a hot rock. That same article references a popular dish in the American colonies: hoe cakes, otherwise known as johnnycakes or flapjacks, which were buckwheat or cornmeal-based pancakes fit for any meal of the day. Then, of course, there’s the latke, that unparalleled pleasure that combines the Best of Beige: fried potatoes, flour, and shortening. (Although, as The Atlantic reports, latkes were originally made with deep-fried ricotta. Still lunch-appropriate.) Finally, True West Magazine points out that sourdough pancakes were a staple for American cowboys, with the cowhands’ “cookie” starting each day around 3 a.m. making coffee, biscuits, bacon, and pancakes for the day.

Point is: humans have been frying up pancakes for millennia, and they’re as good a source of nutrition as any. You’re telling me that your turkey sandwich has more to offer than these delicious discs? Sure, a traditional sweet pancake might be somewhat void of nutritional value, but today’s market is replete with protein-packed options like my beloved Kodiak Cakes. And yes, I add a little bit of syrup because I am a little sugar-coated Christmas elf, but you could just as easily throw on some crème fraîche and green onions, some melted cheese and bacon. You can opt for classic buttermilk or treat yourself to something a bit more savory like this splendid kimchi cheese jeon from Food & Wine. And if you simply must consume something green in the middle of the day (can’t relate, but that’s fine), there’s no reason you can’t serve up your flapjacks with a side salad.

Plus, pancakes are fun. Every time I dish mine out, I’m reminded of that very particular feeling when your mom lets you skip a day of fifth grade because it’s snowing outside and you want to stay in your pajamas. Eating pancakes for lunch feels a little like getting away with something, which is why I’m always so surprised by how satiated I feel post-pancake.

Next Tuesday is Shrove Tuesday – AKA Pancake Day. In the UK, we eat both sweet and savoury versions, but the classic topping is sugar and lemon. Nice and simple! However, other places in the world have their own take on this tasty treat. Wherever you go, you’re likely to find some version of the humble pancake, just with a specific cultural twist. It’s hard to narrow it down and pick the very best ones – but we’ve given it a go. These are the countries we think have pancakes worth travelling for.

France – Crêpes

You can’t possibly make a list of the world’s best pancakes and not include France. Crêpes are unavoidable throughout the country. There are two main types of French crêpes – sweet ones (crêpes sucrées) and savoury ones (crêpes salées). Savoury crêpes are commonly known as ‘galettes’. While sweet crêpes are made using wheat flour, galettes are made with buckwheat – which is great news if you’re gluten free. They can be topped with just about anything, but popular choices include eggs, ham, mushrooms and cheese (obviously – this is France after all!).

America and Canada – Buttermilk pancakes

The pancakes you get across the pond are far thicker and spongier than the kind we have back home. Sometimes called hotcakes, griddlecakes or flapjacks, they’re a very popular brunch food. You’ll find them on the menu at just about every diner across North America. Made using buttermilk (hence the name), they’re gloriously fluffy and far lighter than they appear. They usually come in a towering stack, doused in maple syrup, and are commonly served with crispy bacon.

Thailand – Roti

Thailand’s famous for its incredible food – it’s one of the things that makes it such a great holiday destination. Practically everywhere you go, you’ll find countless street-food vendors selling all manner of delicious dishes, with roti being the most popular sweet treat. A kind of crispy pancake, it’s cut into small squares, drizzled with condensed milk and sprinkled with sugar. So be prepared for a sugar rush! Some sellers add fillings as well. Banana’s the most popular, but you can also find roti with apples, chocolate sauce or Nutella.

One Man’s Personal Revolution in the City of Light

Craig Carlson

A second helping of tales on the joys and challenges of working, eating, and loving in France from the New York Times bestselling author of Pancakes in Paris.

Craig Carlson set out to do the impossible: open the first American diner in Paris. Despite never having owned his own business before—let alone a restaurant, the riskiest business of all—Craig chose to open his diner in a foreign country, with a foreign language that also happens to be the culinary capital of the world. While facing enormous obstacles, whether its finding cooks who can navigate the impossibly petite kitchen (and create delicious roast Turkey for their Thanksgiving Special to boot), finding “exotic” ingredients like bacon, breakfast sausage, and bagels, and dealing with constant strikes, demonstrations, and Kafkaesque French bureaucracy, Craig and his diner, Breakfast in America, went on to be a great success—especially with the French.

By turns hilarious and provocative, Craig takes us hunting for snails with his French mother-in-law and invites us to share the table when he treats his elegant nonagrian neighbor to her first-ever cheeseburger. We encounter a customer at his diner who, as a self-proclaimed anarchist, tries to stiff his bill, saying it’s his right to “dine and dash.” We navigate Draconian labor laws where bad employees can’t be fired (even for theft) and battle antiquated French bureaucracy dating back to Napoleon.

When Craig finds love, he and his debonair French cheri find themselves battling the most unlikely of foes—the notorious Pigeon Man—for their sanity, never mind peace and romance, in their little corner of Paris. For all those who love stories of adventure, delicious food, and over-coming the odds, Let Them Eat Pancakes will satisfy your appetite and leave you wanting even more.

Craig Carlson is the New York Times bestselling author of Pancakes in Paris and the owner and founder of Breakfast in America, the first American-style diner in Paris, which has been featured in The Lonely Planet and Frommer’s Paris travel guides. He lives in Paris with his partner.

Endorsements & Reviews

“Charming. Let Them Eat Pancakes explores Carlson’s unexpected success operating an American diner in the capital of France, with plenty of colorful anecdotes and personal detours.” New York Times, “New and Notable”

“A pleasant, witty memoir from an American diner owner in France.” Kirkus Reviews (starred)

“Let Them Eat Pancakes gives the reader delightful essays on living, working, eating, and loving in France. The writing made me feel as though I were sitting across the table from him enjoying a glass of wine as he regaled me with story after story of his experiences. He made me smile, and even elicited a few (well, more than a few) laughs. . . . This is the perfect book for these times when we need some lightness in our lives, a time when armchair travel is the best we can do.” Betty Taylor, founder of Reading is My Passion

“Eat. Love. Paris. Craig Carlson shares his passion for food and France in this charming, thought-provoking collection of essays. With heart and humor, he shows us the best of America and France, and how we can learn from one another. Whether delving into cultural differences or the challenges and rewards of running a business, Craig is the perfect guide. Let Them Eat Pancakes is a delicious, satisfying dish about following your dreams.”

Janet Skeslien Charles, author of The Paris Library

All the wit and heart of Pancakes in Paris, but even wittier and heartier. Craig Carlson serves up yet another delightful, dizzying account of life in the City of Light. He truly understands the imperfect yet inescapable love of expat life. You root for him on every page. Lisa Anselmo, author of My (Part-Time) Paris Life: How Running Away Brought Me Home

“This second helping of stories about the author’s life in Paris is as cheering as an all-day American breakfast.” Stephen Clarke, author of A Year in the Merde and 1000 Years of Annoying the French.

Craig Carlson’s “Let Them Eat Pancakes” is a feast for your funny bone. It is clever, informative, and filled with outrageous characters that make up the intoxicating appeal of the cuisine and people of Paris. It’s also an authentic insight into the bureaucracy of living and working in France. Nancy Lombardo Whats The Buzz New York

“Hilarious. In addition to the menu, which serves only American food, introducing French customers to diner traditions — bottomless cup o’ joe, anyone? — is half the fun.” New York Post

A man has gone viral on social media after his friend shared his very precise method for eating pancakes, with some praising him and others thinking it was a waste of time

How to eat pancakes

  • 17:37, 16 Jan 2021

When it comes to pancakes, we’ll admit, we’ve never really spent too much time thinking about how we should eat them.

When a stack is placed in front of us, we just dig right into the fluffy, syrupy goodness.

But a man has caused a stir on social media after sharing the very specific way he eats American-style pancakes.

In a video shared to TikTok by a user named @christineyuns she shows how her friend carefully slices into a stack of pancakes, cutting them into quarters and then halving each section once again.

Christine admitted that she initially didn’t understand why he bothered to do this, so she asked him.

The man explained that with his method, “every bite will be uniform in size”.

After cutting the stack, he then adds maple syrup, making sure that every single piece gets the same amount of drizzle.

He continues to say: “When the syrup goes on, it gets all the corners and it’s even. In all the crevices.”

The video states that once you’ve tried this method you won’t want to eat pancakes any other way as this promises a “perfect bite every time”.

The clip has since gone viral, being viewed more than three million times and garnering over 346,000 likes.

Thousands of people also commented on the video, sharing their thoughts on the method.

Quite a few people admitted to already eating their pancakes like this, saying it was normal and agreeing it was the “best” way to do it.

However others thought it was a complete waste of time.

“No, I don’t have the patience for that,” proclaimed one person.

Another said: “I wouldn’t have the patience to take that much time cutting. I would BITE right in.”

“I personally enjoy stuffing the whole thing in my mouth,” confessed a third.

Someone else replied: “I roll up my pancakes and dip them in syrup so they don’t get soggy – nothing worse than soggy pancakes.”

An outraged user posted: “TIME YOU’RE DONE MAKING PERFECT TRIANGLES THE PANCAKES ARE ICE COLD.”

A couple of other people were keen to find out how Christine (the person who filmed the video) eats her pancakes if she thought this method was unusual.

She later revealed in the comments exactly what she does.

“I cut off a piece of the first layer and dip it in syrup lol like a normal person.”

How do you eat pancakes? Let us know in the comments below.

The perfect weekend breakfast, without a doubt, is a stack of pancakes, hot off the griddle, topped with pure maple syrup. Yum. It’s a combination as elemental as peanut butter and jelly, originating at least two hundred years ago, if not more. Pancakes and maple syrup each have their own lore, but as to how they came together? Well, that’s not so straightforward.

Pancakes Through the Ages

Pancakes are literally as old as the hills, reaching back to our prehistoric ancestors who made their own sort of pancake either with ground grains and nuts or ground plants like ferns, cooking them on hot stones. The ancient Greeks and Romans whipped up pancakes with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and milk. In medieval times pancakes were made with buckwheat or rye, sans leavening, while the Elizabethans favored flavorings of rose water, sherry, apples, and spices. Shakespeare, no doubt smitten, mentioned pancakes in two of his plays, All’s Well That Ends Well and As You Like It. And every culture seems to have its variation on pancakes, from French crêpes, Russian blini, and Swedish pancakes, to Welsh crampog, Dutch pannekoek (also spelled pannekoeken), and Native American Indian cakes or johnnycakes, which were made from cornmeal.

Dutch colonists brought their pannekoek recipes to America and by 1740 they were dubbed buckwheat cakes, while the English brought Shrove Tuesday, or Pancake Tuesday, a traditional feast day falling before the start of Lent. Pancakes stacked up as a great American breakfast for Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, who adored hoecakes. And pancakes, also known as griddle cakes, hotcakes, and flapjacks, among other names, even figured into the legend of Paul Bunyan, the American folklore hero and mighty lumberjack with a giant appetite to match.

An Indigenous Discovery Shared with Colonists

Maple sugar also played a role in Native American mythology. Indigenous communities of northeastern North America were the first to discover the magic of maple. They tapped sugar maple trees and turned the sap into maple sugar, using a process called sugaring, which they taught to the Europeans. In Canada, there are accounts from as early as the mid-1500s of French settlers learning maple sugaring techniques from indigenous tribes, boiling the sap into syrup or bricks for future consumption. And it may have been the early pioneers who used syrup as a stand-in for more familiar toppings like treacle or syrup, typically made from cane sugar.

“I think that maple as a flavoring of rather bland things such as hoecakes, our traditional Iroquois cornbread, johnnycakes and later on Dutch pannekoek, French crêpes and English/Scots Canadian scone or bannock, and eventually American-style pancakes, all make sense,” says Dave Smoke McCluskey, a Mohawk chef with strong roots in New York and New England, who also owns the small-batch hominy and masa company, Corn Mafia and Lyeing Mohawk Masa. The Dutch pannekoek, he points out, were often served with stroop, a thick apple syrup, similar to colonial boiled cider. And the Mohawk and Dutch trade endured for decades—close enough that a pidgin of Dutch and Mohawk was spoken—and perhaps another union, of a culinary stripe, formed. “My guess is that enjoying pancakes with maple syrup sprang from this strong friendship. It makes the most sense to me,” he says.

Historians of Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, a living museum that celebrates New England’s early colonists in the formative period of 1790 to 1840, point to other possibilities. “The first reference we know of people putting maple anything on their pancakes, or fritters, is from The Housekeeper’s Assistant from 1845 and published in Boston,” they say. And a recipe (then referred to as a “receipt”) for maple molasses, they add, can be found earlier in Susannah Carter’s cookbook, The Frugal Housewife, from 1803. “Though initially an English publication, this was an edition published in New York with the addition of ‘several new receipts adapted to the American mode of cooking.'”

We Still Flip for Flapjacks

There were other reasons why maple syrup found its way to the plate. “Maple syrup in this region is what people use as a sweetener because granulated sugar coming up from Cuba and Haiti in the past century was much more expensive,” explains Laura Glenn, who, along with her husband Eric Sorkin, co-owns the Vermont-based Runamok Maple, which sells pure, infused, smoked, and barrel-aged maple syrup. Curiously, the light maple syrup back then was called fancy, and emulated sugar as much as possible, she says, while Grade B syrup, with its robust flavor, was exported—a stark reversal of history compared to today’s tastes.

However pancakes and maple syrup joined forces, one thing’s for sure: It’s a storied combination with staying power. The reasons why it tastes so darned good are probably as infinite as the stories associated with each foodstuff’s beginnings. Whatever your pancake preference—plain and simple, or with blueberries, oats, or bananas and buttermilk—just stack them up and let the maple pour.

Table of Contents

About The Book

A rhinoceros makes the best kind of friend—and unexpected breakfast guest—in this hilarious and charming picture book from the creators of the bestselling Dogs Don’t Do Ballet.

Daisy is eating her breakfast when a big purple rhinoceros strolls into the kitchen—just like that! Then it takes a bite out of her pancake—just like that! Daisy tries to tell her parents, but they’re much too busy to listen. So Daisy starts talking to the rhino instead. until her parents finally take notice of their enormous purple visitor!

This funny, heartwarming story from the team who brought you Dogs Don’t Do Ballet is sure to bring a smile to readers who know the ups and downs of busy family life.

About The Author

How to eat pancakes

Anna Kemp writes both picture books and middle-grade fiction. Her books have been nominated for a number of prizes including the Booktrust Early Years Award (2010), The Roald Dahl Funny Prize (2010, 2012), The Waterstones Children’s Book Prize (2011, 2013), Oscar’s Book Prize (2015), and The Dundee Picture Book Award (2018). Her work has also been adapted for television (Bookaboo, CBeebies), puppetry (Little Angel), dance (Ballet Black), orchestra (LSO) and theatre (New Writing North, Little Blue Monster). She is currently working on new picture books and a middle-grade fantasy series.

Anna loves to visit schools and libraries and is available for festival events. Please see website for further information: https://annakemp-author.com

About The Illustrator

Sara Ogilvie is an illustrator and printmaker. She was the 2011 Booktrust Best New Illustrators Award winner and was shortlisted for the Best Emerging Illustrator Award 2010. Dogs Don’t Do Ballet, which she illustrated, was shortlisted for the Roald Dahl Funny Prize 2010 and the Booktrust Early Years Award 2010. Sara lives in lives in Newcastle upon Tyne in the North of England.

Product Details

  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books (May 5, 2015)
  • Length: 32 pages
  • ISBN13: 9781481438452
  • Grades: P – 3
  • Ages: 4 – 8
  • Lexile ® AD530L

Browse Related Books

Raves and Reviews

A purple rhino moves in and the adults are oblivious. What’s a kid to do?Daisy’s parents never listen to her anyway. So when she tries to point out to Mom and Dad that a huge, purple rhinoceros is strolling into the kitchen, chomping a pancake, and heading upstairs, they mishear and dismiss her. The creature makes himself at home. He hangs out in the yard; he keeps Daisy company while she dons her roller skates; he even sits on the toilet. Steadfast Daisy, unalarmed, decides that since her parents are too busy to pay attention to her, she’ll talk to the rhino instead. They become fast friends. Ogilvie uses pencil, pastel, ink, paint, monoprint, and digital tools to create lighthearted illustrations full of loose lines, enlivening the matter-of-fact, sometimes-bland text. Fanciful colors, overlaps of media, and colorings-in that escape their outlines make for a 1970s vibe. Humor and sadness blend: the rhino’s single tear is poignant as he expresses his longing to go home (“a million miles away”), but Daisy’s possible solutions include a hot air balloon and a bicycle, rejected because “the helmet would never fit.” Only outside proof of the rhino’s existence conquers Daisy’s parents’ denial, and the text dulls as Daisy reconnects with them, but the last page upticks in wit. Amusing and whimsical.

– Kirkus Reviews, March 1, 2015

Daisy’s parents are awfully busy. So busy, in fact, that they don’t notice the huge purple rhino that tromps into their kitchen, snaps up a pancake, and makes himself at home. Nor do they pay attention when Daisy tries to tell them there’s a huge rhino in their house. Luckily for Daisy, Rhino is not busy at all and he loves to listen. When her parents finally wonder about the missing pancakes, and Daisy tells them about her pachyderm pal, they hoot with laughter and take her to the zoo to show her a real rhino. Only, the zoo’s rhino, who happens to be purple and loves pancakes, is missing. A quick trip home reveals the truth, and Daisy and her sheepish parents help the rhino get back to Africa. Ogilvie’s loose, sketchy illustrations, full of loopy streaks of colored pencil and pastel in a saturated palette, are charmingly childlike and add to the droll atmosphere. As much a cautionary tale for parents as a giddy yarn for kiddos, this will make for an entertaining read-aloud.

– Booklist, April 15, 2015

In this agreeably chatty book, little Daisy is eating pancakes when a big purple rhino “strolled into the kitchen. That’s right, a big purple rhino!” Daisy’s parents cut her off each time she tries to tell them about the rhino, who nonchalantly wanders around the house, even using the toilet (Daisy closes the bathroom door for him). Her parents eventually listen long enough to realize what Daisy is saying, but they still don’t believe her, so they take her to the zoo to show her what a real rhinoceros looks like—and end up surprised themselves. Ogilvie’s illustrations use a variety of media—pastels, paint, ink, and more—in an informal style that matches the tone of the casual text. The bright colors spill out of their lines, lines are sometimes scribbly or jagged, and the people all have perpetually startled wide eyes. Visual humor plays into every picture, such as Daisy’s parents sitting perched on the end of the sofa that the rhino earlier sat on (and broke). Most of the elements are familiar, from the unexpected visitor to the oblivious parents, but the humor is on target for the pre-K to third grade set, and it’s got great read-aloud potential for groups or at home.

Shrove Tuesday is also commonly known as Pancake Day, but how did these sweet treats become associated with the holiday?

  • 13:09, 28 FEB 2022
  • Updated 13:25, 28 FEB 2022

How to eat pancakes

Shrove Tuesday is a holiday where it is traditional to eat loads of pancakes, earning it the nickname Pancake Day.

But why is Shrove Tuesday associated with the sweet treats?

In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday marks the beginning of the run-up to Easter, otherwise known as Lent.

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The 40-day period of Lent is traditionally observed as a period of self-discipline and people tend to give up a bad habit or vice until Easter begins.

This could include things such as eating luxurious food, so many eat pancakes as a last bit of self-indulgence before starting their Lent diet – but that’s not all there is to it.

There are many luxurious foods, so why do people traditionally choose to eat pancakes as their last indulgent food for 40 days?

Historically, Shrove Tuesday marked a day where people had to prepare for Lent, and since people were not going to be baking cakes or other sweet treats for over a month they needed to get rid of any leftover items that would go out of date.

Thus enters the pancake, it’s a quick and easy treat that uses eggs, milk and sugar – a practical solution to using up rich ingredients.

As time has gone on, pancakes have become synonymous with Shrove Tuesday and are integral to the celebration.

Some communities even choose to do a pancake race where people have to race each other while holding a frying pan with pancakes in it.

How to eat pancakes

IHOP is canceling its annual National Pancake Day promotion. But it’ll still give away free pancakes. (Photo: IHOP)

IHOP has brought back a fan-favorite deal that stacks up: all-you-can-eat pancakes.

The breakfast food chain noted the return of the all-you-can-eat deal on Twitter earlier this week and lays out the details of the fan-favorite deal on its website.

Diners can order a full stack of all-you-can-eat pancakes for $5.99. The deal also applies to separately priced pancake combos, including the ultimate bacon and sausage combo, the bacon and egg combo, the sausage and egg combo, the ham and eggs combo, and the regular combo.

“We’ll keep the pancakes coming in stacks of 2 until you say ‘when’!” IHOP says on its website.

YoU CaN’T EaT aLL tHe PaNcAkEs – someone who doesn’t know that All You Can Eat Pancakes are back at IHOP, probably. pic.twitter.com/EJEJjSXSKx

The deal is available for dine-in only at participating restaurants all day.

IHOP notes that the deal is available “for a limited time” and prices may vary. The all-you-can-eat deal offers buttermilk pancakes only and is not valid with its 55-and-up menu, omelets or kids’ menu items.

Follow USA TODAY reporter Bailey Schulz on Twitter: @bailey_schulz.

How to eat pancakes

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With so many of you having to stay home and cook for the first time — ever or more than you have in a long time — we get that it can be overwhelming to have to cook all your meals from scratch. So, we’re here to get you started.

Each day we’re going to post a new skill here and go in detail about how to do it — a resource for cooking basics so you can get food on the table and get through this.

How to eat pancakes

A series of simple tutorials for making some basic recipes at home.

Lesson 27: Pancakes
A common complaint about making pancakes is that you have to cook them one at a time, and by the time the last one is cooked the first ones are cold and tough. And though every recipe says you can keep pancakes warm in a low oven while making them as an optional step, I make it an essential part of my recipe. Some people just eat pancakes when out at a diner to avoid the whole production, but well, we can’t really do that now, can we? In any case, my secret is: Just make fewer pancakes.

Unless you’re feeding a crowd — which I bet many of us aren’t right now — pancakes are the perfect breakfast for two. I mix up a batter that makes only seven pancakes — one for a first-test pancake and then six to eat; that’s three per person — with a little extra to account for all the batter that clings to your scooping cup and the bowl. That way, from the first pancake to the last, only about 12 minutes goes by and the first pancakes I made are perfectly warm and tender in the oven, not getting too dried out or tough.

I start by making a batter with built-in texture insurance. Just like with my blueberry muffins, I add a little cornstarch to the batter to both cut the percentage of protein in the flour, thus making the pancakes more tender, and give them a finer crumb. Using powdered sugar also helps with the latter, but if all you have is granulated sugar, that works fine too. I whisk the liquid ingredients — full-fat milk and butter, please; these are pan-cakes, not pan-granolabars — into the dry ingredients very gingerly. You want some lumps in your batter because by the time you whisk it completely smooth, you’ve developed too much gluten and the pancakes will be tougher for it.

I don’t have a griddle so I cook my pancakes one at a time in a large nonstick skillet (if you have a griddle, though, please use it). Don’t try to cook more than one in a skillet; they inevitably do that thing where they touch at their edges and form oblong football shapes, instead of perfectly round disks, and can our OCD handle that right now? I like my pancakes to have that classic flat look like you get in diners so I cook them in a dry skillet, but if you like crunchy edges, you’ll want to fry them in butter (see “Variations” in the recipe below).

Now, let’s talk about that “first pancake.” There’s no mystery around why it comes out wonky and pale. The wonkiness comes from you not pouring batter into a hot pan regularly so you have get used to the movement. The paleness comes from your pan not being hot enough yet — hey, we’re all impatient so it’s OK. Let pancake nature take its course, then toss that first cake to the dog or a toddler, if you have one of those pulling on your leg.

With the first pancake out of the way, get to work. I made this batter to have the ideal viscosity to spread slowly on its own into a perfect round, but if yours comes out a little thick, use the bottom of the measuring cup to smooth its top after you pour it in the skillet. What you’re looking for is for the edges to lose their shine and for bubbles to appear on the top of the pancake. The bubbles will pop, and the loose batter will fill in the gaps. Once this stops happening, they’re ready to flip.

Flip with confidence: Tilt the skillet toward the pancake at the same time that you flip so the disk lands against the pan on an angle like a pro swimmer dives into a pool, not inelegantly like a belly flop.

Once the pancake is flipped, it will take about half or one-quarter of the time less than the first side to cook through. The first side will take around 1 minute, so start checking the second side at 30 seconds and don’t let it cook further than 45 seconds. It should be the same color as the top. Remove the whole skillet from the burner — this keeps it from overheating and throwing off your expert timing, burning the remaining pancakes — and slide the pancake between two kitchen towels on a baking sheet in a low oven (don’t worry; you’ve already set this up). There the pancake will stay warm and the towels will protect it from losing moisture.

Return the skillet to the burner and immediately add another scoop of batter. You stick to this exact routine and each pancake will be as perfect as the last. Once they’re all cooked, stack three to a plate — or more, or less; I don’t know your life! — swipe with a large knob of butter and cascade down several glugs of syrup. Smile smugly, knowing that everyone’s pancakes are hot and fluffy at the same time, no diner required.

Editor’s note: Let’s Eat That explores why we began to eat certain foods.Want to know about a certain meat, veggie, seafood or dessert?Let us know [email protected]

“So easy, a caveman can do it,” goes the famous line.

The first pancakes can be traced back to the primeval stages of mankind, when cavemen created flat grain-based cakes that were cooked on hot rocks.

In sixth century Greece, a dish called “taginite,” made from wheat flour, honey olive oil and curdled milk, became an extremely popular breakfast food.

Cratinus, a famed Greek poet of the time, often wrote of taginites describing them as warm and delicious.

It was not until the late 15th century that the term “pancakes” was actually coined.

A historical English manuscript cites a recipe for “pancakes,” a term which might have already been established at the time but was not found in earlier cookbooks.

Pancakes gained more popularity in historical England after they became a tradition of Shrove Tuesday, which would later be nicknamed Pancake Day.

The day before Lent, Catholics felt the need to use all stock of luxurious goods, which included flour, eggs, sugar and fat. Creating batches of pancakes with these ingredients quickly became a tradition, as did the annual pancake races that are still held today.

However, pancakes are not only an English dish.

Through the centuries, the simple basis of the pancake has found dozens of variations across the globe.

In a book titled “Pancake: A Global History,” author Ken Albala writes about close relatives of the modern day pancake, which include the French crepe, the African akara, the Russian blini,, and even the Scandinavian aebleskiver.

How to eat pancakes

Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day is the traditional day to eat pancakes in the UK, but they’re quick and easy to make anytime.

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, or any other type of diabetes, you might be looking for some ideas to make your next batch of pancakes a healthier option. Here we give you some tips for healthier swaps to everyday baking.

We’ve got ideas for healthier toppings – sweet and savoury – plus tips if you’re gluten or dairy-free. Try our foolproof recipe below and get flipping.

Pancake ingredients

You’ll need just three ingredients: plain flour (you could try using wholemeal flour instead), one egg, and milk.

Simple switches for healthier pancakes

  • Don’t add butter to the batter.
  • Use a spray oil or measure your oil (1 tsp of oil is enough to cook eight pancakes if you use the same oil soaked into kitchen paper and wiped around your frying pan).
  • Go for toppings like fresh fruit, natural yogurt, or chopped plain nuts which have no free (added) sugars and contain healthy fats.

Read on for advice on how to change some of the ingredients to make your pancakes healthier or to suit your diet.

Flour

Pancakes can be made with most flours: white or wholemeal, oat flour, rice flour or buckwheat. For a gluten free option, you can use gluten-free flour or even nut or rice flour.

Depending on the flour you choose, you can use this classic recipe as a guideline, but you may need a little more or less liquid as absorption rates vary. Different flours such as nut flours need a gentler heat to prevent burning. You can even make pancakes from potatoes for a savoury option.

Eggs and milk

Most pancakes contain egg, but not all. You can use egg substitutes for a vegan alternative. The liquid is milk or water or a mixture of both. If you’re looking for a dairy free version you could try soy, rice milk or nut milks, such as almond, which all work well too.

Top tips for top batter

Sift your chosen flour into a bowl. (This is to add air, so when sifting wholemeal flour you’ll be left with the wheat bran in the sieve. Just add this back into the sieved flour.)

Next, make a well in the middle of your flour. Add lightly beaten egg and half your liquid then mix into a smooth paste.

Gradually mix in the rest of the liquid and beat it until you have a smooth batter with no lumps. If using wheat flour, cover the batter and leave it to stand for 30 minutes to an hour. This relaxes the gluten and improves the texture of the pancakes, making them softer and less chewy.

Cooking tips

With any pancakes it’s important to get an even medium temperature across the pan – non-stick pans are the best option. You need virtually no oil if the temperature and consistency are right.

  • Test the pan with a small pancake first to make sure it’s not too hot or too cool. Start with a low to medium heat and allow the pan to heat fully before adding the oil and batter.
  • Add a little batter (2–3 tablespoons is plenty) to the pan and swirl it gently to spread the batter out thinly. Leave for 30–40 seconds, it should form a crust on the edges and the pancake will have bubbles in the middle.
  • Ease the edges with a spatula and shake the pan. You should be able to move the pancake around without it sticking. It’s now ready to flip. You can use a large spatula or toss the pancake then cook the other side for around one minute.

Four steps to flipping a pancake

  1. A shallow-sided pan is best. (You can buy specific pancake pans, too.)
  2. Make sure the pancake is cooked and slides easily round the pan when shaken.
  3. Slide the pancake towards the handle then away from it a couple of times.
  4. Then, when shaking it, increase the speed and flick the pan upwards and away from you, only a few centimetres but quite vigorously. This should toss it onto the other side.

Best pancake toppings

Lemon juice and sugar are traditional toppings, but try a sugar alternative, such as a low-calorie granulated sweetener instead, with a squeeze of fresh orange.

You could also try chopped nuts, grated lemon or orange zest or unsweetened Greek yogurt and berries. Or you could go savoury with beetroot and cottage cheese, or prawn and avocado.

For some of us, plain-old pancakes are an excuse to eat cake for breakfast. But starting the day with added fiber and protein will help prevent the sugar jolt and crash, giving you more sustained energy throughout the day. Here are six ways to turn your pancakes into power food.

1. Add whole grains
Swap out some of the white flour for whole-wheat, rye or buckwheat. (You might need to increase the liquid because whole-grain flours are thirstier.) You could also add polenta, oats or cooked whole grains to give them extra fiber.

2. Add nut meal
For a boost of healthy fat and protein, substitute finely ground almonds, walnuts or other nuts for some of the flour. You can buy some nut flours premade or grind your own in a food processor. Just add a tablespoon of flour to prevent the nut flour from turning into nut butter.

3. Add fruit
The surest way to up the antioxidant quotient of your pancakes is to add blueberries (duh) but don’t stop there: Try raspberries or sliced strawberries, peaches or bananas. (Frozen fruit works perfectly in the winter.)

4. Add vegetables.
No, no, we’re not going to suggest you sneak kale to your pancakes, unless you’re going savory. But squash or parsnip puree or quickly cooked grated carrots are delicious in a sweeter-style pancake; just fold them right into the batter.

5. Add seeds
Seeds offer fiber and protein along with healthy fats. Tiny seeds, like poppy, chia or flax work best. If you soak the chia seeds first, you can use them as an egg substitute. (For 1 egg, grind 1 tablespoon of chia seeds and soak in 3 tablespoons of water.)

6. Make them gluten-free.
Are gluten-free pancakes healthier? That depends. If they include fiber-rich ingredients, like brown rice and coconut flour, then yes. Though all-white gluten-free flour pancakes are hardly healthier than the original, this version is no less delicious. At least there’s that.

Kristin Donnelly is a former Food & Wine editor and author of the forthcoming The Modern Potluck (Clarkson Potter, 2016). She is also the cofounder of Stewart & Claire, an all-natural line of lip balms made in Brooklyn.

With a few tweaks, you can turn an otherwise unhealthy stack of pancakes into a nutritious breakfast. Here are several recipes to get you started.

How to eat pancakes

Garnish your stack of pancakes with fruit to sneak produce into your meal.

When smothered in butter and drowning in maple syrup, pancakes aren’t the healthiest breakfast option — but with a little know-how, you can turn them into a nutritious, energizing, and tasty meal.

“The part about pancakes that’s ‘unhealthy’ isn’t necessarily the pancakes themselves, it’s what you put on top of them,” says Charlotte Martin, RDN, a physical therapist and recipe developer in Baltimore. “Calories, fat, and sugar can really start to add up when you start adding mix-ins like chocolate chips and toppings like butter and syrup,” Martin says.

Another issue: Most popular store-bought mixes lack fiber, Martin says. A diet high in fiber is satiating, and is associated with healthy weight, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels, according to the Mayo Clinic.

How can you build a healthier pancake recipe? Start by using whole grains in place of refined flour, and opt for applesauce with no added sugar or mashed banana instead of sugar. You can even sneak in more fiber by adding shredded zucchini or carrots, says Sonya Angelone, RDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics who is based in San Francisco. “And if you’re looking to add some protein to a typically lower-protein breakfast, try adding some cottage cheese, Greek yogurt, or protein powder to the mix,” she says.

Next, look for healthier toppings. Great options include fresh cut fruit, warmed berries, no-sugar-added nut butter, and spices like cinnamon. “You can still have a nutritious pancake breakfast while enjoying more classic pancake toppings like maple syrup and butter, but portion control is key here,” Martin says.

Finally, consider adding other foods to bolster the nutritional value of your pancake breakfast. “I love pairing my pancakes with Greek yogurt and fruit — one way to get extra protein and make a balanced meal,” says Yasi Ansari, RDN, a certified specialist in sports dietetics and a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in Los Angeles.

Intrigued? Try one of these healthier takes on classic pancakes.

Sweet Potato Pancakes

This lightly and fluffy pancake recipe from Sweet Peas and Saffron blends sweet potato puree, coconut oil, all-purpose or whole-wheat flour, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Sweet potatoes offer a rich source of vitamin A, a key nutrient for vision, immune function, and reproduction, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). One baked sweet potato contains roughly 1,403 micrograms (mcg), or 156 percent of your daily value (DV) of vitamin A, according to estimates from the NIH. Each pancake has 636 mcg of vitamin A, or about 71 percent of the DV, along with 89 calories, 3 grams (g) of fat, 12 g of carbohydrates, and 2 g of protein.