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How to eat walnuts

Why The Health Is This Good For Me?

By Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN

What They Are

Most of us have a favorite nut (the kind you eat, that is!). Today we’re focusing on the oldest tree food known to man, the walnut. Walnuts are probably best known for their hard-to-open shells and brain-like shape. Seriously, have you ever examined one? No wonder they’re good brain food: They look like little brains! They’re grown all over the world, and while they may get picked over in the mixed-nut bowl, there are plenty of reasons to seek them out. So let’s get crackin’.How To Chow Down

The Dirty Deets

We eat nuts for their heart-healthy fats and protein. An ounce of walnuts — that’s about 14 halves — contains 185 calories, 4 grams of protein and about 18 grams of fat. (You’ll burn some of those calories trying to break them open.)

  • Walnuts are the only nuts that contain high amounts of omega-3 essential fatty acids (also known as ALA), which promote heart health and help lower blood pressure. You’ll get 2.5 grams of ALA per ounce of walnuts, but you don’t need a whole ounce to get results; eating even a few walnuts per day has been found to have health benefits.
  • Research has shown that walnut chomping can help manage metabolic syndrome, diabetes and inflammation. The nuts also have anticancer properties and can even play a role in weight management. Most of us have at least one of these ailments lurking in our genes, so it’s worth dropping a walnut or two into your daily diet.
  • Huh? What? Walnuts are known to improve cognitive functioning and memory. Eating them regularly has also been linked to a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

How To Chow Down

I was just joking about the workout you’ll get cracking walnuts. Who has the time? Buy your walnuts shelled — halved, in pieces or chopped — and store them in the freezer after you open them. Walnuts have a high oil content, which causes them to spoil when exposed to air and warmth. Keeping ‘em cold extends their life.

  • Eat your walnuts straight up, on top of oatmeal, salads, cereals and yogurts. Mix them into your pilaf and quinoa salads. Bake ‘em up in your favorite dessert. Because they’re mild, they’re also versatile; capitalize on that by pairing them with sweet and savory dishes.
  • Walnuts are deeply embedded in the Mediterranean diet, so try them in a feta grilled cheese as an amazing vegetarian lunch. You can also make a deliciously decadent spread that’s sure to satisfy and is rich with nutrients. Don’t forget to arm yourself with cruditГ©s for dipping!
  • If you’re looking for something sweet, you’d be nuts to overlook our friend the walnut. Walnut biscotti are the perfect cookie to satisfy a craving and keep your tea company. By the way, the cocoa and ginger in this biscotti recipe are antioxidant powerhouses, so you can actually feel good about having one!

In The Know

The best foods out there are the ones that don’t come in fancy packaging. They aren’t marketed on billboards or endorsed by superstars. Walnuts are the perfect example of what a best food embodies — they grow in nature, are full of health benefits and taste delicious. Stop passing them by and bring home a bag. Your heart, brain and waistline will thank you!

How to eat walnuts

Soaking the walnuts overnight and then consuming them in the morning is one of the best ways to consume walnuts. To do this, take 2-4 pieces of walnuts and soak them in a cup of water overnight. Have them the first thing next morning. Having soaked walnuts helps in reducing the bad cholesterol in the body. These are also easier to digest as compared to normal walnuts. It is easier for your body to absorb nutrients from soaked walnuts.

Easy ways you can include walnuts in your diet

Walnut chutney/spread/dip

Take some roasted walnuts, garlic, lemon juice, oil, pepper and salt and grind them together to make walnut dip at home. You can also add some walnuts while making the hummus.

Add them to stuffing

You can simply toast some walnuts and add them to the stuffing of your sandwich or paranthas.

Use them for garnishing

Toast some walnuts, grind them and keep them in an airtight container. You can use them to garnish your salads and desserts.

Add them to your smoothie

While you make your smoothie, grind some walnuts with other ingredients. Not just your smoothie will taste better but its nutritional value will also be enhanced.

Walnuts toffees

Take some walnuts, cocoa powder and honey. Make a sticky paste with honey and cocoa and add walnuts to it and store in an airtight container. These walnut toffees make for a great snack when hunger strikes in between meals.

Benefits of having walnuts

Good for diabetics

Many studies show that eating soaked walnuts everyday helps in controlling diabetes. It is best for people suffering from Type-2 diabetes.

Prevents cancer

Walnuts are rich in antioxidants that prevent the growth of cancer cells in the body. Walnuts are an essential part of an anti-cancer diet.

Helps in managing stress

Walnuts are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. Including them in your daily diet can help fight depression and stress. Soaked walnuts are also great for enhancing the mood.

Promotes weight loss

Walnuts are a good source of calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc. Having soaked walnuts increases metabolism and further helps in losing weight. Walnuts also have good fats that make one feel fuller for longer, which prevents you from overeating and thus help with weight loss.

Helps sleep better

Walnuts have a compound called melatonin that can help you sleep better. If you eat soaked walnuts in the morning and before going to bed, you will sleep better.

It can make your bones and teeth stronger

Walnuts are a rich source of healthy fatty acids and magnesium, which is necessary for making the bone stronger and healthy.

Promotes hair growth

Walnuts have vitamin B7, which is great for your hair growth. Eating soaked walnuts in the morning can make your hair strong and long.

Reduces cholesterol level

Consuming soaked walnuts help in lowering the LDL cholesterol levels, which reduces your risk of heart diseases.

TIMESOFINDIA.COM | Last updated on – Nov 5, 2020, 18:00 IST

01 /5 ​​​Benefits of consuming walnuts

Walnuts are known for improving brain function and boosting memory. Apart from this, walnuts carry a long list of lesser-known health benefits as well. Do you know that the way you consume walnuts also decides how beneficial they are? Well, there is a certain way to eat walnuts with which you can gain maximum benefits.

02 /5 ​Best way to eat walnuts

Though walnuts can be eaten as it is by removing the outer shell, the best way to have them is by soaking overnight. Just soak 2-4 walnut pieces overnight in a cup of water and have them first thing in the morning. Soaking walnuts helps in reducing the bad cholesterol levels in the body. They are also easier to digest as compared to normal walnuts. Your body can absorb nutrients from soaked walnuts in a much better way.

03 /5 ​Health benefits of walnuts

Walnuts are indeed a superfood, as they are loaded with carbohydrates, protein, good fat, fibre, vitamins, calcium, iron and potassium. Apart from improving good cholesterol levels and keeping the heart healthy, walnuts are also beneficial for people with diabetes. Walnuts are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids and help prevent stress and anxiety. They also have alpha-linolenic acid, which makes your bones and teeth stronger.

04 /5 ​Walnuts for weight loss

As walnuts are a rich source of iron, calcium, potassium and zinc, they help in boosting your metabolism. It further aids in efficient weight loss. Walnuts contain good fats which don’t add to your weight or calories. Their fibre content also keeps you full for longer and prevents frequent hunger pangs.

05 /5 ​Different ways to include walnuts in the diet

If you find eating walnuts raw a little boring, then there are several interesting ways to have them. Just crush a few roasted walnuts and include them in your paratha stuffing. This will make your paratha crunchier and also add an extra nutty taste.

Walnuts can also be added, to protein shakes and smoothies by crushing them along with other ingredients. You can also make a homemade walnut chutney or dip by using walnuts, garlic, ginger, lemon juice, oil and salt and pepper. A little bit of mint can be added, to the chutney as well.

For kids who are fussy eaters, this trick will work wonders. Just mix some cocoa powder and honey. Throw in some walnuts in the paste and coat them well. Let them dry and store in an airtight jar.

How to eat walnuts

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What’s not to love about the humble walnut? From the major nutrients that it provides to the versatility it offers in the kitchen, this tree nut is an all-around awesome food—a superfood, if you will.

Walnuts are jam-packed with good-for-you nutrients. From plant-based proteins to fiber to ALA omega 3 fatty acids, these little nuts pack a punch in the nutrition department. And when it comes to antioxidants, know that walnuts appear to have more antioxidant activity compared to any other nut out there.

Walnuts are known to be a delicious addition to baked goods and a perfect topping to salads and other dishes. But less known are some secret side effects that you may experience when you include walnuts in your daily life. If you happen to be a walnut lover, here are six secret side effects that you may experience when you are chowing down on your favorite nut. Read on, and for more on how to eat healthy, don’t miss 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.

You may experience lower cholesterol.

More than 10% of Americans do not have ideal cholesterol levels and could benefit from taking steps to lower their concentrations. A study published in Circulation found that regular daily walnut consumption is linked to sustained lower levels of cholesterol among 708 healthy older adults who included walnuts as part of their diet for 2 years. 6254a4d1642c605c54bf1cab17d50f1e

You may live a longer life.

Until somebody discovers the true Fountain of Youth, if you want to live longer, your best bet appears to be leaning on walnuts to help accomplish your quest.

In a study published in Nutrients, results show that higher walnut consumption—both in terms of the amount and frequency—may be associated with a lower risk of death and an increase in life expectancy among older adults in the U.S., compared to those who do not consume walnuts.

Your body may have a hard time absorbing iron.

If you are a major walnut-eater, you may want to hold off on taking an iron supplement or eating iron-rich foods at the same time as your nutty indulgence.

Walnuts contain phytic acid, a compound that can inhibit the absorption of iron. And although they aren’t the nut with the highest concentration of this acid, (we’re looking at you, Brazil nuts!), they do contain some and it should be taken into account when you eat them.

Iron isn’t the only mineral that phytic acid blocks your absorption of. This acid can also inhibit the absorption of calcium and zinc too, depending on how much you are actually eating.

If you are concerned about your nutrient absorption, there is no need to consider cutting walnuts out of your diet completely. Simply time your walnut-rich meal or snack so you are not eating it at the same time as your iron-rich food.

You may have a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

Higher walnut consumption is associated with a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women, according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition.

Compared with other nuts, which typically contain a high amount of monounsaturated fats, walnuts are unique because they are linked to a positive effect on insulin resistance, and therefore may help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

You may experience medication interactions.

If you are taking a medication that treats hypothyroidism and you eat walnuts consistently, your medication may be a touch less effective.

If you have any concerns, simply raise them with your doctor. It may take a dose adjustment to give your body what it needs.

You may feel satisfied after you eat.

Walnuts contain the trifecta of satiating nutrients—protein, fiber, and healthy fat. Including walnuts along with your oatmeal, trail mix, or other recipes may give you some extra staying power and help you feel satisfied for a longer period of time.

How to eat walnuts

Yes, walnuts are known for boosting brain health but that’s not all! Walnuts are rich in fiber, vitamins, carbohydrates, proteins, and iron which are all essential for our overall health. Crunchy and delicious akhrot or walnut have numerous benefits for our overall wellbeing.

We spoke to NutritionistEkta Sood and she shared some benefits of consuming soaked walnuts everyday. All you need to do is soak 2 walnuts in water. Leave them overnight. Consume them the next morning. This should be done everyday to enjoy the maximum benefits of walnuts. Read on to know how consuming these soaked walnuts will benefit your overall health.

What Does The Expert Say?

Nutritionist Ekta Sood shared, “All the nuts including walnuts should be soaked because when you soak them they get easily digested in our body as compared to having them raw. The absorption also increases because of phytic acid which is present in nuts, by soaking walnuts phytic acid reduce and it gets easily absorbed. People with weak gut can have more issues digesting raw walnuts. Soaking not only helps in digestion and absorption but also reduces the heat of the walnut.”

How to eat walnuts

She said, “We all know the benefits of walnuts like heart health, regulates blood sugar levels, reduce inflammation (only if soaked) great for skin, give good night sleep, improve our metabolism. But if we don’t soak them they the absorption goes low and will get difficulty in digesting them. That why it’s always suggested to soak them for better use and taking more benefits out of them.” “ Adding walnuts to your diet prevents colon cancer or stomach ulcers. Basically the bacteria in the gut converts ellagitannins into the urolithins. Because of polyphenolic and urolithin, walnuts have strong anti cancer and anti inflammatory properties. ” s he added. Read on to know some more benefits of eating soaked walnuts.

Good For Diabetics

A lot of studies suggest that eating soaked walnuts every day helps in controlling diabetes. It is more beneficial for people with Type-2 diabetes.

How to eat walnuts

Prevents Cancer

Because of its antioxidant properties, walnuts have compounds that prevent the growth of cancer cells in the body. The expert shared that consuming walnuts can prevent colon cancer.

Fights Stress

Walnuts are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. Eating them every day helps you fight depression and stress. Soaked walnuts are also said to be a great mood enhancer.

Helps In Weight Loss

Did you know that eating soaked walnuts can also make you lose weight? Walnuts are a good source of calcium, potassium, iron copper, and zinc. They increase the metabolism of the body and this further helps in making you lose excess fat from your body. Walnuts also have good fats that make you feel full for a long time. This prevents you from overeating.

How to eat walnuts

Helps In Better Sleep

Walnut has a compound called melatonin and it makes your sleep better. If you have soaked walnuts in the morning and before going to bed, you have a better sleep.

Makes Bones And Teeth Stronger

Walnuts have some components that make your bones and teeth stronger.

Gives You Long Hair

Because walnuts have B7 in them, they are great for your hair. Eating soaked walnuts makes your hair strong and long.

How to eat walnuts

Maintains Cholesterol Levels

Soaked walnuts help in lowering the bad cholesterol level of the body. It regulates cholesterol levels and prevents heart diseases. This further promotes your heart health.

Here are some ways you can add soaked walnuts to your diet:

  • Soak walnuts at night and munch them the first thing in the morning. Consume 2 walnuts every day.
  • You can keep a bowl of soaked walnuts near your bed and have them before you sleep.
  • You can add some soaked walnuts to your morning cereal.

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  • You can also make a box of dry fruits and add all soaked dry fruits in one and carry it to work. This is a healthy snacking option.
  • Walnuts can also be added to your bowl of oats or salads.

Recommended Video

Walnut consumption is also touted to be helpful in promoting healthy heart, controlling blood sugar, manage diabetes and more.

How to eat walnuts

Highlights

Walnut has long been proven to be a superfood due to its high nutritional value. This brown, crunchy nut that comes in hard shell, resembling human brain, is rich in antioxidant, vitamins, minerals and several other nutrients. According to the USDA nutrition data, a cup of walnut contains 200 calories of energy, 3.89 grams of carbohydrate, 2 grams of fibre 5 grams of protein and more. It is also rich in omega 3 fatty acid. As a result walnut has several health benefits, including weight management. Eating walnuts makes you feel full for a longer time, which helps in reducing untimely hunger pangs that further may lead to shedding those extra kilos.

Walnut is rich in antioxidant, which can help in preventing from ageing. A study by Walnuts and Healthy Aging (WAHA) stated that daily consumption of walnuts help in healthy ageing and improves the blood cholesterol levels. Another study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that daily consumption of walnut helps a person to have sharper mind in old age.

Other than these, walnut consumption is also touted to be helpful in promoting healthy heart, controlling blood sugar, manage diabetes and more. Hence, you can consider walnut to be a part of your daily diet.

Here Are Five Interesting Ways You Can Add Walnut In Your Daily Diet:

1. You can make chutney or spread or dip with walnut and enjoy as accompaniment with several dishes. You can easily make a walnut chutney at home with roasted walnuts, garlic, ginger, lemon juice, oil and salt and pepper. You can also add some walnuts while making your hummus.

2. You can toast walnuts and add as stuffing in your parathas and sandwiches.

3. Walnut can be used to garnish you favourite salads and desserts. Crush them and sprinkle!

4. Grind the walnut and make smoothie with it. All you need are milk or yogurt, walnuts, honey and any fruit or flavour of your choice.

5. Make walnut toffees at home to much during those untimely hunger pangs. Take some walnuts, cocoa powder and honey. Make a sticky paste with cocoa powder and honey and mix well with walnuts and store in an air tight jar.

Consider including walnut in your daily diet and have a healthy life!

About Somdatta Saha Explorer- this is what Somdatta likes to call herself. Be it in terms of food, people or places, all she craves for is to know the unknown. A simple aglio olio pasta or daal-chawal and a good movie can make her day.

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Walnuts are well-packed with essential nutrients like fibre, protein, potassium, healthy fats and much more.

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Walnuts are also a powerful source of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids. Here are some more reasons why you must incorporate walnuts to your daily diet.

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This nut is loaded with antioxidants that can help fight against oxidative stress. Walnuts may also help reduce bad cholesterol, promoting overall heart health.

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High blood pressure is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. According to studies, adding walnuts to diet can help improve blood pressure.

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Walnut nourishes the healthy bacteria in the gut. A healthy gut assists in several body functions.

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Walnuts are a perfect snack if you are trying to lose weight. They will help you stay full for longer and control appetite. But have walnuts in moderation as these are calorie-dense.

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The presence of omega-3 in walnut makes it beneficial for your brain. Walnuts can also help control inflammation and support brain function as you age.

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You can have walnut as it is in the morning or as a snack. It can also be added to salads and desserts or on top of oats or yogurt.

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They lower cholesterol, boost virility and cut down cortisol. It’s time you gave walnuts a crack

How to eat walnuts

Like dogs, walnuts should be for life, not just for Christmas. Why? Because they have some superb (and surprising) health benefits.

Before we explain, here’s a little background. First, walnuts are not actually botanical nuts at all. They are drupe seeds: peaches, plums and cherries are also drupes, though in those cases we eat the outside part rather than the inside. Second, walnuts are, perhaps, the least subtle superfood in existence. As if to signal they’re rich in polyphenolic compounds that counter cognitive decline, they resemble a surgically removed brain, albeit a tiny one. And it’s not just your grey matter that benefits from a regular helping of walnuts.

Women in their 50s and 60s who consume at least two servings of walnuts a week have a ‘greater likelihood’ of healthy ageing compared to non-consumers, according to new research. In the study, “healthy ageing” was defined as ‘longevity with no major chronic diseases, good mental health and no impairments in either cognitive or physical function.’

In men, Tunisian scientists demonstrated that just 15g of walnuts per day can help to lower harmful LDL cholesterol and reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol by up to a fifth. That handful can also boost your testosterone by as much as 10%, helping to maintain your bone density, muscle mass and sex drive.

Speaking of sex drive, another illuminating study found that walnuts are the ultimate fuel for long-term virility. The Spanish study found that eating 60g of nuts – 30g walnuts, 15g hazelnuts and 15g almonds – increased libido and sexual function in men. Previous studies into this area have also found that nuts can improve sperm quality. This is interesting as a recent study from Canada found that men who think they are not ‘man enough’ believe eating more red meat will somehow augment their masculinity, when it walnut (sorry, couldn’t resist).

Debby Maugans

Debby Maugans, food writer based in Asheville, North Carolina, and author of Small Batch Baking, Small Batch Baking for Chocolate Lovers and Farmer and Chef Asheville.

Published Date: January 28, 2016

Updated Date: October 19, 2020

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Eating walnuts must be the tastiest way to protect your heart and your mind.

Just a handful lowers “bad” LDL cholesterol and improves the way your blood vessels function. They’re rich in alpha-linolenic acid, a plant form of omega-3 fat linked with better brain function and positive moods. And even though they are high in fat and calories, research finds that people who eat them regularly don’t gain weight.

Our guess: It’s because they are so satisfying. At 185 calories, a daily one-ounce serving (about seven halves, or one-quarter cup) provides heart-healthy benefits without derailing your diet. To find new ways to include walnuts in our meals, we asked cookbook author Debby Maugans. She gave us three recipes: Walnut Butter, Walnut Baba Ghanoush and Candied Walnuts (yes, healthful “candy!”). Be sure to read her tips at the end of this article to learn 15 more ways to enjoy walnuts.

EVEN BETTER THAN PEANUT BUTTER

Walnut Butter

This one is so delicious that it can entice even the most resolute peanut butter devotee. We tested several versions using raw walnuts, toasted walnuts, nuts with a little olive oil to make it creamier, salt and no salt. The winner was a mixture of raw and toasted walnuts, a little salt and a teaspoon of honey to smooth out any residual bitter taste from tannins in traces of walnut peel that may cling to the nut after shelling. Toasting the walnuts adds texture and aroma, too.

Makes about one cup

  • 2 cups chopped raw walnuts
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Spread one cup of the walnuts on a baking sheet and bake until fragrant, 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely.

Place remaining raw nuts and the toasted/cooled walnuts in a food processor. Process until the mixture is a coarse paste, about 30 seconds. Add honey and salt, and process until smooth, 20 to 30 additional seconds. Scrape bowl as needed.

Store in a covered jar in the refrigerator.

A NUTTY TWIST TO EGGPLANT SPREAD

Walnut Baba Ghanoush

For these flavors to blend and develop a richer overall flavor, refrigerate the dip for 4 to 6 hours. Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before serving.

  • 1 (1- to 1¼-pound) eggplant, unpeeled
  • 3 large shallots
  • Vegetable cooking spray
  • 3 Tablespoons Walnut Butter (see recipe above)
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup crushed raw walnuts

Preheat oven to 400° F.

Remove stem end from eggplant, and cut in half lengthwise. Peel shallots and cut lengthwise into quarters. Place eggplant halves on baking sheet, cut sides up, and coat with cooking spray. Place shallots on baking sheet, and coat with cooking spray. Bake, turning shallots occasionally, until eggplant is very tender when pierced with fork and shallots are golden—about 45 to 50 minutes. Let cool on baking sheet.

Remove peel from eggplant and chop coarsely. Add to food processor with shallots, walnut butter, lemon juice and salt, then process until smooth, scraping bowl as necessary. Add walnuts and pulse until well blended, 2 or 3 times.

Transfer to a bowl, cover and refrigerate 4 to 6 hours. Remove from refrigerator 30 minutes before serving with crackers, pita bread or vegetables.

A LESS SWEET TREAT

Maple Candied Walnuts

Store-bought candied nuts often are coated with loads of sugar. A little pure maple syrup gives our candied walnuts just the right amount of sweet flavor with a crunchy crystal coating.

  • 1 cup raw walnut halves
  • 2 Tablespoons maple syrup
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt

Place a dry medium-size skillet on medium heat. When it is hot, and working quickly, add walnuts, maple syrup and salt. Stir until nuts are coated and let it cook, stirring frequently, until walnuts are toasted and syrup is almost evaporated but not burned.

Scrape out onto a sheet of wax paper, and let cool. As they cool, separate walnuts with a fork. Store in an airtight container. Eat as a snack…or use as a topping, such as over yogurt, oatmeal or salad.

15 MORE WAYS TO ENJOY WALNUTS

The best way to have the freshest walnuts is to purchase them in their shells and open them as needed. The next best way is to purchase shelled walnut halves—they’ll stay fresh longer than pieces. Store in a cool dry place in an airtight container.

If the appearance in a recipe is important, you can dice them. When a recipe calls for crushed walnuts, place walnut halves in a freezer ziplock bag and roll with a rolling pin to crush them. You’ll end up with pieces that appear almost ground and some that are finely broken.

Here are more tasty ways to slip walnuts into your diet…

1. When making a smoothie, toss in one-quarter cup of walnuts or two tablespoons of walnut butter.

2. Make a savory Walnut Crumble Topping to sprinkle on and season cooked vegetables. Mix one cup finely chopped, toasted walnuts, one cup whole wheat panko, one tablespoon minced fresh thyme, ⅛ teaspoon salt and one tablespoon extra virgin olive oil. Store in a sealed freezer bag in the freezer.

3. Sprinkle two tablespoons of finely chopped Maple Candied Walnuts over a dish of yogurt or fruit for a naturally sweet dessert, snack or breakfast.

4. Make this appetizer: Stuff one-half teaspoon of goat cheese into a date, then tuck in a walnut half.

5. Before roasting fish fillets, coat them with crushed walnuts.

6. Grill or roast peach or pear halves. Drizzle one teaspoon of honey into each half and add one tablespoon of walnuts.

7. Make a kale salad with diced fresh pears and walnuts. Toss with vinaigrette.

8. Toss shaved and blanched brussels sprouts with a walnut vinaigrette. Crush ¼ cup walnuts. Sauté one minced shallot in two teaspoons walnut or olive oil Add three tablespoons rice wine vinegar or Champagne vinegar and one teaspoon Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Stir in walnuts.

9. Add walnuts to brown rice to augment the protein in vegetarian main dishes.

10. For a heart-healthy dessert, dip walnut halves in melted dark chocolate and let it cool and harden.

11. Sprinkle crushed walnuts over mashed cauliflower. (No really—try it!)

12. Make a breakfast bowl of cooked oatmeal topped with chopped walnuts and vanilla yogurt.

13. Keep a jar of walnuts on your desk to snack on throughout the day.

14. Pack several single serving-size snack bags of walnuts mixed with dried cranberries (look for the kind that doesn’t have added sugar) to keep handy for breakfast or lunch on the run.

15. Try walnut oil in salad dressings. It’s made from nuts roasted before pressing, so it has a deep nutty flavor.

Interested in other healthy nuts too? See Bottom Line’s Best Nuts for Your Health.

Got a recipe that uses walnuts that you want to share—or a tweak on the recipes here? Leave a comment below!

How to eat walnuts

Lauren Manaker, MS, RDN, LDN, CLEC, CPT, has studied nutrition for almost two decades. She was named an emerging leader in women’s health by the National Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

How to eat walnuts

Angela Underwood’s extensive local, state, and federal healthcare and environmental news coverage includes 911 first-responder compensation policy to the Ciba-Geigy water contamination case in Toms River, NJ. Her additional health-related coverage includes death and dying, skin care, and autism spectrum disorder.

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How to eat walnuts

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Key Takeaways

  • A large observational study using data that was collected over 20 years showed that eating more walnuts is linked to a reduced risk of early death.
  • The benefits of eating walnuts were even observed in people who followed “suboptimal” diets, though the people who ate an “optimal” diet experienced more benefits.
  • Eating more walnuts can be as easy as having them on hand for a quick snack or adding them to meals as salad or oatmeal toppings.

According to a new study, being a regular walnut eater might lower your risk of heart disease and help you live longer. The results were published in the journal Nutrients.

“In this study, eating at least five servings of walnuts per week was linked to around a year of additional life expectancy, which is impressive considering how simple and economical incorporating walnuts into your diet is,” Melissa Azzaro, RDN, LD, a New Hampshire-based registered dietitian and author of “A Balanced Approach to PCOS,” tells Verywell.

The benefits were also seen in people who ate two to four servings of walnuts per week (one serving of walnuts is one ounce—about seven walnuts). However, the positive association was not strong as what was seen among people who ate more servings.

Walnuts May Help You Live Longer

To evaluate the positive effect of eating walnuts, the researchers obtained data from over 67,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (1998–2018) and over 26,000 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1998–2018). All of the participants were free of cancer, heart disease, and stroke at the start of the study.

Caroline Thomason, RD, CDCES

No surprise here that these little morsels are associated with improving our risk for all-cause mortality and a longer lifespan.

During the 20-year follow-up period, the researchers observed that the participants with higher walnut consumption and higher frequency of walnut consumption had a lower risk of dying from any cause (all-cause mortality) as well as a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease (CVD mortality) compared to people who did not eat walnuts.

Key Findings

The researchers noted several key findings in their study, including that:

  • For each 0.5 serving increase in walnut consumption per day, participants had a 9% lower risk of early death.
  • People who ate walnuts more than five times per week had around a 25% lower risk of dying from CVD than people who did not eat walnuts.
  • For each 0.5 serving/day increase in walnut consumption, there was a 14% lower risk of dying from CVD.
  • People who ate walnuts gained about one year of life expectancy—a benefit that was not observed in people who did not eat walnuts.

Walnuts and “Suboptimal” Diets

The reduced risk of early death was seen among the walnut eaters regardless of whether they were following an “optimal” diet. In fact, among the people with a “suboptimal” diet, a 0.5 serving per day increase in walnut consumption was linked to a 12% reduced risk of all-cause early death and a 26% reduced risk of early death due to CVD.

“Considering what we know about the Mediterranean diet and heart-healthy fats, these results are not super surprising,” Caroline Thomason, RD, CDCES, a dietitian and diabetes educator, tells Verywell. “Walnuts offer heart-smart omega-3 fats, unsaturated fat, and fiber—three nutrients that can improve everything from joint health to digestion! No surprise here that these little morsels are associated with improving our risk for all-cause mortality and a longer lifespan!”

Limitations

There were several limitations to the research. For one, the study was observational in nature (and correlation does not equal causation) and was supported by the California Walnut Commission.

The researchers also point out that the people in the study who ate more walnuts tended to have an overall healthier lifestyle—which may have played more of a role in their health than their walnut consumption.

Walnuts: A Nutrition Powerhouse

While they might not be a “lifesaver,” walnuts can still be a tasty, versatile, and nutritious part of a balanced eating plan. One serving of walnuts also contains four grams of plant-based proteins, two grams of fiber, and micronutrients like copper, magnesium, and calcium.

The nuts are also packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and healthy fats. In fact, walnuts are the only nut that is an excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) omega-3 fatty acids, which support many aspects of your overall health.

A 2014 study published in Advances in Nutrition showed that ALA may help improve heart health and might play a role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, including stroke and heart attack.

Research has shown many positive effects of eating walnuts, especially when consumed as part of an overall nutritious diet. Walnut consumption has also been linked to a reduced risk of developing CVD, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

A 2016 study featured in the Journal of the American Heart Association evaluated the benefits of a Mediterranean diet that was high in fish supplemented with ALA among older Spanish people with high cardiac disease risk. The results of the study showed that there was a reduced risk of all-cause mortality among the people who received additional ALA.

How To Eat More Walnuts

Eating more walnuts can be as simple as having them on hand at snack time. Azzaro says that you can also “add them to salads, baked goods, and yogurt, or use them in recipes where they are used to coat fish or chicken.”

No matter how you are including walnuts in your diet, know that committing to eating a serving throughout the week may serve you well in an economical and low-effort way.

What This Means For You

Eating walnuts a few times a week (on their own as a snack or as part of a meal) can have many health benefits. It might even lower your risk of heart disease and help you live longer.

TIMESOFINDIA.COM | Last updated on – Sep 2, 2021, 18:00 IST

01 /5 How walnuts can improve your heart health

If you are fond of munching on nuts quite often, then keep walnuts on your top list. Walnuts are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids which have been shown to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health.

According to a new research, healthy older adults who ate a handful of walnuts (about 1/2 cup) a day for two years modestly lowered their level of low-density lipoprotein or LDL cholesterol levels. The findings of the study were published in the American Heart Association’s flagship journal ‘Circulation’. Consuming walnuts daily also reduced the number of LDL particles, a predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. (image credits- istock)

02 /5 ​According to the author of the study

“Prior studies have shown that nuts in general, and walnuts in particular, are associated with lower rates of heart disease and stroke. One of the reasons is that they lower LDL-cholesterol levels, and now we have another reason: they improve the quality of LDL particles,” said study co-author Emilio Ros, MD, PhD, director of the Lipid Clinic at the Endocrinology and Nutrition Service of the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona in Spain.

“LDL particles come in various sizes. Research has shown that small, dense LDL particles are more often associated with atherosclerosis, the plaque or fatty deposits that build up in the arteries,” Ros explained.

“Our study goes beyond LDL cholesterol levels to get a complete picture of all of the lipoproteins and the impact of eating walnuts daily on their potential to improve cardiovascular risk,” Ros added. (image credits- istock)

03 /5 ​Details of the study

In a sub-study of the Walnuts and Healthy Aging study, a large, two-year randomised controlled trial examining whether walnuts contribute to healthy ageing, researchers evaluated if regular walnut consumption, regardless of a person’s diet or where they live, has beneficial effects on lipoproteins.

This study involved 708 participants between the ages of 63 and 79 (68 per cent women) who were healthy, independent-living adults residing in Barcelona, Spain, and Loma Linda, California.

Participants were randomly divided into two groups: active intervention and control. Those allocated to the intervention group added about a half cup of walnuts to their usual daily diet, while participants in the control group abstained from eating any walnuts.

After two years, participants’ cholesterol levels were tested, and the concentration and size of lipoproteins were analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. (image credits- istock)

04 /5 ​Key findings of the study

After 2 years, participants in the walnut group had lower LDL cholesterol levels by an average of 4.3 mg/dL, and total cholesterol was lowered by an average of 8.5 mg/dL.

Daily consumption of walnuts reduced the number of total LDL particles by 4.3 per cent and small LDL particles by 6.1 per cent. These changes in LDL particle concentration and composition are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

LDL cholesterol in men fell by 7.9 per cent and in women by 2.6 per cent. (image credits- istock)

05 /5 ​Conclusion

“For individuals with high blood cholesterol levels, the LDL cholesterol reduction after a nut-enriched diet may be much greater. Eating a handful of walnuts every day is a simple way to promote cardiovascular health,” Ros added.

“Many people are worried about unwanted weight gain when they include nuts in their diet. Our study found that the healthy fats in walnuts did not cause participants to gain weight,” Ros continued.

“The outcomes were similar in both groups, so we can safely apply the results of this study to other populations,” Ros concluded. (image credits- istock)

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How to eat walnuts

The study, published in the journal Nutrients and funded by the California Walnut Commission, found eating five or more servings of walnuts per week was associated with a 14% lower risk of death (from any cause), 25% lower risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases, and a gain in about 1.3 years of life expectancy, compared to those who didn’t consume walnuts.

For the study, researchers examined data from 67,014 women of the Nurses’ Health Study who were average aged 63.6 years and 26,326 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study aged 63.3 years in 1986. Participants were relatively healthy when they joined the studies (e.g., free of cancer, heart disease and stroke) and were followed for about 20 years (1998-2018). Dietary intake was assessed every four years in which participants reported on their overall dietary intake—including how often they consumed walnuts, other tree nuts and peanuts—as well as lifestyle factors like exercise and smoking status. Based on the data, researchers identified associations between walnut consumption at varying levels and different health indicators related to longevity.

One ounce of walnuts is a powerhouse of important nutrients, including 4 g protein, 2 g fiber, 45 mg of magnesium (45mg) and 2.5 g of essential omega-3 ALA.

While eating five or more servings of walnuts a day had the most benefits, the researchers noted consuming walnuts in lower amounts also had benefits. Eating walnuts two to four times per week had a 13% lower risk of death overall, 14% lower risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases, and a gain in about one year of life, compared to non-walnut consumers. Even among people with a suboptimal diet, consuming just a one-half serving of walnuts per day was associated with benefits, including 12% reduced risk of death and 26% lower risk of death from cardiovascular diseases.

By now we all know that what we eat has an impact on our overall health, and everything from a serving of popcorn to a helping of fruit and vegetables can boost general bodily functions. But some foods actually do a little more. According to recent research published in the journal Nutrients, walnuts have more than just the usual health benefits—eating this snack could also help lengthen your lifespan.

“What we’ve learned from this study is that even a few handfuls of walnuts per week may help promote longevity, especially among those whose diet quality isn’t great to begin with. It’s a practical tip that can be feasible for a number of people who are looking to improve their health, which is top of mind for many people,” Yanping Li, the lead investigator from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said in a media release.

The researchers gathered data over the course of 20 years from 67,014 women who were an average of 64 years in age, originally found in the Nurses’ Health Study. The team then studied 26,326 men from information in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. After looking into this data and the other from a survey on the groups’ walnut consumption, the scientists found that those who ate above five servings of walnuts each week had a 14 percent decrease in death from health-related causes. Plus, there was a 25 percent less chance of death specifically from cardiovascular disease and about one year-and-a-half boost in life expectancy when people eat walnuts than when they do not.

Even if consumers would like to improve other areas of their eating habits, the study authors noted that if people eat half a serving of walnuts each day, the risk of death still lowers by 12 percent and heart disease is decreased by 26 percent. Overall, most study participants who ate walnuts also had a generally healthy diet, exercised, consumed multivitamins, and periodically drank alcohol. showed While the team uncovered these findings, more research will help definitively tie walnut consumption and extended life expectancy.

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Plant-Forward Eating

Plant-Forward Eating

A growing body of research highlights numerous benefits of a plant-forward diet. The beauty of this eating style is how adaptable it can be to individual preferences and health conditions, making it achievable for many consumers. Explore these plant-forward eating resources for helpful tips, recipe ideas, and nutrition information to inspire your clients to make the shift towards plant-forward eating.

How to eat walnuts

Cracking the Basics of Plant-Forward Eating

Help your clients better understand what plant-forward eating means and that it is not “all or nothing.” You don’t have to go meat-free to be more plant-forward.

How to eat walnuts

Plant-Forward Eating Tips and Tricks

With a few tips and tricks, your clients will be eating more tasty plant-forward meals in no time.

How to eat walnuts

8 Easy Ways to Replace Saturated Fats with Unsaturated Fats

How to eat walnuts

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Start rethinking the center of the plate at breakfast, lunch and dinner with this selection of fresh and deliciously colorful plant-forward recipes.

How to eat walnuts

Have A Plant ® : The Plant-Forward Eating Guide

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Supportive but not conclusive research shows that eating 1.5 ounces of walnuts per day, as part of a low saturated fat and low cholesterol diet and not resulting in increased caloric intake, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. (FDA) One ounce of walnuts offers 18g of total fat, 2.5g of monounsaturated fat, 13g of polyunsaturated fat including 2.5g of alpha-linolenic acid – the plant-based omega-3.

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You may think of walnuts as a dessert ingredient in cookies, muffins, brownies, and baklava. But walnuts are also perfect for snacking, or as a topping for salads, cooked veggies, whole grains, and hummus. In addition to their crunch, walnuts deliver important nutrients and offer science-backed health benefits. Here are some of the top perks of this healthful tree nut.

Walnuts are nutrient-rich

One ounce (about a quarter cup, or 14 walnut halves) provides 18 grams of good fat, 4 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, nearly 50% of the daily target for manganese, and smaller amounts of magnesium, iron, calcium, and B vitamins. Manganese is a mineral that supports healthy bones and is needed for collagen production and wound healing. Walnuts are also packed with antioxidants known to possess anti-inflammatory effects, which help protect against the initiation and progression of cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases.

They deliver healthy fats

Alpha linolenic acid, or ALA, is a type of omega-3 fatty acid known to reduce inflammation. Walnuts contain more ALA than any other type of nut. A 2020 study, published in the journal Nutrients, assessed the effects of walnut consumption on the omega-3 fatty acid profile of healthy adults over a four-week period. Researchers found that after a month of consuming a few ounces of walnuts daily, the subjects’ omega-3 status improved. They also experienced reductions in body weight and body fat, plus gains in lean body mass and body water.

Walnuts can help gut and heart health

The bioactive compounds in walnuts may play an important role in altering the gut environment in ways that impact disease outcomes, say researchers. In a six-week Penn State study of overweight adults with cardiovascular risk, the addition of walnuts to their diet enhanced beneficial gut bacteria linked to health benefits, including reduced blood pressure and total cholesterol.

They help reduce blood pressure

In a 2019 study, published in Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers found that when study subjects ate whole walnuts, they experienced greater benefits than when they consumed a diet with a similar fatty acid profile without walnuts. Outcomes included a reduction in central diastolic blood pressure (the pressure that moves towards the heart), and positive changes to cholesterol profiles. Scientists say the study is an example of how a relatively small eating change can result in significant cardiovascular benefits.

They can benefit brain health

Eating walnuts may help slow cognitive decline in at-risk groups of older adults, according to a 2020 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Researchers randomly assigned over 600 elder adults to either a diet with 15% of calories from walnuts or a control diet without walnuts. While the walnuts had no effect on the cognitive function of healthy subjects, brain MRIs showed that the nuts had a greater effect on higher-risk people, including heavier smokers, and those with lower baseline neuropsychological test scores.

Walnuts offer breast cancer protection

Building on previous studies in animals, researchers assessed the effects of breast cancer growth in women, in a study published in Nutrition Research. In the trial, women with breast lumps were randomly assigned to consume either two ounces of walnuts per day or no walnuts for two to three weeks prior to surgery. Initial biopsy samples were compared to those obtained when the lumps were removed. Scientists found that walnut consumption altered the expression of over 450 genes in the tumors in ways that could suppress cancer growth and improve survival outcomes.

They play a role in weight regulation

In a small trail published in the journal Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism, subjects were given smoothies that either contained walnuts or no walnuts for five days, while living in a controlled clinical research center. The addition of walnuts decreased feelings of hunger and improved appetite regulation. Researchers say the impact of walnuts on satiety could be due to changes to the central nervous system that affect food cues. The shift could help curb obesity risk.

Walnuts can improve male fertility

The largest clinical trial to date to analyzing the effects of nut consumption on sexual function in healthy men was published in the journal Nutrients in 2019. Researchers found that over 14 weeks, men who ate about two servings (two ounces) of a nut mixture daily as part of a Western-style diet experienced a significant increase in orgasmic function and sexual desire. The mixture was made up of 50% walnuts, 25% almonds, and 25% hazelnuts.

More ways to enjoy walnuts

For a healthy snack, pair walnuts with fresh fruit, dip them into melted dark chocolate, or incorporate them into energy balls. Add walnuts to smoothies or overnight oats at breakfast, sprinkle them onto black bean or lentil soup at lunch, and include them in recipes like veggie tacos and stir fries at dinner.

You can also whip up a simple walnut pesto made from walnuts, pureed with extra virgin olive oil, basil, garlic, salt, and pepper. Drizzle it over roasted veggies, toss it with zucchini spirals, or use it as a creamy, flavorful salad dressing.

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and a private practice performance nutritionist who has consulted for five professional sports teams.

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How to eat walnuts

New Delhi: Despite three months of scorching heat, summer is full of reasons to invest in well-being, from seasonal fruits and vegetables, long days and international and national food days to keep reminding you of your promise of good health to your mind and body.

Here are some reasons why you should consume walnuts every day:

Packs a nutritional punch

Walnuts are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and offer other heart-healthy fats, protein, fibre, and vitamins (including vitamin B6), among others. Munching on these daily may reduce the risk of heart disease, improve brain health, ensure a healthy gut, and help in weight management. In fact, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI)’s Eat Right During Covid-19 guidelines mention foods with omega-3, zinc, selenium, protein and vitamin B to help maintain a healthy immune system and play a role in our body’s healing and recovery. And each of these nutrients is present in walnuts. Now, while no single food can prevent or treat illness, it is important to eat a balanced diet.

Easy to incorporate in meals

Munching on a handful of walnuts isn’t the only way to reap the health benefits of this nutritious food. They are incredibly delicious and crunchy and boast great potential on the cooking front because of their ability to absorb flavours and work equally well in both sweet and savoury dishes. To add some much-needed excitement to your daily meals, you can pair these with a variety of food groups, including fruits and veggies, dairy, and bread and cereals, to name a few. Toss it into your salad, cake, or ice cream, blend it with fruits and veggies for your morning smoothie or grind it into a paste to use in dips or gravy, or simply make a trail mix — there are so many creative ways to work them into your diet.

Easy to store

Contrary to popular belief, walnuts can easily remain fresh at home provided you store them away from moisture, light, and warmth. Shelled or unshelled put the walnuts into a resealable bag or an airtight container and place it in the refrigerator or freezer based on the period of use. If you’re going to use them within a month, keep them in the refrigerator or move them to the freezer.

Making everyday healthy is not an easy task, but with walnuts in your daily meals, you may get a few steps closer.

Representation purpose only.

Walnuts are extremely nutrient-dense since they have high amounts of plant proteins, phytochemicals and antioxidants apart from also being packed with vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber.

  • Last Updated: November 04, 2020, 18:40 IST
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Nuts and seeds are not only good for your health but also make for a delicious snack. Carrying them around is just as easy as including them in your diet, especially during the autumn and winter seasons. But if you’re looking for the one type of nut that rules them all, walnuts are what you need.

Walnuts are extremely nutrient-dense since they have high amounts of plant proteins, phytochemicals and antioxidants apart from also being packed with vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. Eating walnuts is associated with a number of health benefits.

Walnuts for the heart

5 Ways in Which You Can Keep Your Heart Healthy

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A recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology indicates that consuming walnuts regularly is really good for your heart health and can even reduce the risks of cardiovascular diseases. This study says that apart from lowering cholesterol levels, long-term walnut consumption is also linked with reduced inflammation in the body. Both of these factors improve heart health immensely.

So, eating walnuts regularly can keep your heart healthy and happy. But that’s not the only benefit you can gain from consuming walnuts every day. The following are five other advantages:

1. Improves cognitive function: You may have noticed that walnuts look like tiny brains, and that’s just nature’s way of hinting at one of the biggest benefits of eating walnuts. Walnuts have polyphenols, vitamin E, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, all of which are great for your brain. Not only do walnuts reduce oxidative stress and damage to the brain but also improve memory and other cognitive functions.

2. Aids weight control: Studies show that eating walnuts can help you control your appetite better and thereby help you keep your weight in check. This is not only because walnuts are nutrient-dense and can keep you feeling full for longer but also because the polyphenols in walnuts are believed to activate the part of the brain that helps regulate food cues. Eating walnuts can therefore also help you manage your cravings.

3. Supports gut health: Eating enough walnuts every day can help you maintain your gut microbiota, which plays a significant role in all digestive functions. Studies indicate that walnut consumption is positively correlated to an increase in good gut bacteria and it may even help the bowels produce an enzyme called butyrate that promotes gut health.

4. May improve blood pressure and glucose levels: Many studies indicate that walnuts can help keep blood pressure levels in check and some even suggest that consuming higher quantities of walnuts can lower the diastolic blood pressure levels. Similarly, both walnut and walnut oil consumption is considered to help control blood sugar levels, thereby reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

5. May reduce cancer risks: As mentioned before, walnuts are packed with antioxidants that help reduce oxidative stress and cell damage. A type of polyphenols in walnuts, which are called ellagitannins, are particularly effective in this regard. Studies show that these polyphenols prevent colorectal cancer as well as hormone-related cancers like breast cancer and prostate cancer.

For more information, read our article on Walnuts.

At first glance, walnuts might seem pretty strange. They’re wrinkly, oddly shaped, and resemble mini-brains. (You’ll never unsee it!) But if you can get past their peculiar appearance, walnuts are worth a try. Highly nutritious, the crunchy as they’re highly nutritious. They’re rich in good-for-you fats and antioxidants, plus vitamins and minerals to boot. Ahead, learn about walnut health benefits, plus ways enjoy to walnuts at home.

What Are Walnuts?

Walnuts are the seeds of the walnut tree, according to a scientific review in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS). The tree sprouts fleshy fruits with a green, leathery outer layer known as the hull or husk. When the fruit is ripe, the hull breaks open to reveal a hard brown shell that houses the kernel (aka seed) — this is the part you eat. The other parts are typically discarded or used for industrial purposes, such as energy production, according to the aforementioned review. While there are many types of walnuts, in the U.S., the most common variety is the English walnut (aka common walnut or Persian walnut). And get this: Botanically speaking, walnuts are not actually nuts, but rather the seed of a drupe, a type of fruit that contains a seed. The more you know!

Walnut Nutrition

If the walnut were to win a superlative, it would likely be for its sky-high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which are often referred to as “good” fats. In fact, it’s one of the top plant sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of PUFA that’s an anti-inflammatory superstar, according to a 2019 study. The nuts also offer fiber, folate, vitamin E, potassium, magnesium, and antioxidants, such as polyphenols, according to a review in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (Related: Simple Ways to Use Walnuts In Your Healthy Cooking)

Here’s the nutritional profile of 14 raw walnut halves (

An annual food day that captures our attention the most is National Walnut Day, which falls on May 17 every year. Why? Let’s take a look.

Reported By: | Edited By: DNA Web Team |Source: ANI |Updated: May 17, 2021, 06:46 AM IST

Despite three months of scorching heat, summer is full of reasons to celebrate. From the beautiful sunshine, the temptation of seasonal fruits and vegetables, and, of course, international and national food days to keep you in a celebratory mood all season long even though the current health situation may make you feel otherwise.

An annual food day that captures our attention the most is National Walnut Day, which falls on May 17 every year. Why? You may ask. Let’s take a look at our big three reasons.

1. Packs a nutritional punch

Walnuts are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and offer other heart-healthy fats, protein, fiber, and vitamins (including vitamin B6), among others. Munching on these daily may reduce the risk of heart disease, improve brain health, ensure a healthy gut, and help in weight management. Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI)’s Eat Right During COVID-19 guidelines mentions foods with omega-3, zinc, selenium, protein, and vitamin B to help maintain a healthy immune system and play a role in our body’s healing and recovery. And each of these nutrients is present in walnuts. Now, while no single food can prevent or treat illness, it is important to eat a balanced diet.

2. Easy to incorporate in meals

Munching on a handful of walnuts isn`t the only way to reap the health benefits of this nutritious food. They are incredibly delicious and crunchy and boast great potential on the cooking front because of their ability to absorb flavors and work equally well in both sweet and savoury dishes.

To add some much-needed excitement to your daily meals, you can pair these with a variety of food groups, including fruits and veggies, dairy, and pieces of bread and cereals, to name a few.

Toss it into your salad, cake, or ice cream, blend it with fruits and veggies for your morning smoothie or grind it into a paste to use in dips or gravy, or simply make a trail mix – there are so many creative ways to work them into your diet.

3. Easy to store

Contrary to popular belief, walnuts can easily remain fresh at home provided you store them away from moisture, light, and warmth. Shelled or unshelled put the walnuts into a resealable bag or an airtight container and place it in the refrigerator or freezer based on the period of use. If you’re going to use them within a month, keep them in the refrigerator or move them to the freezer.

Supportive but not conclusive research shows that eating 1.5 ounces of walnuts per day, as part of a low saturated fat and low cholesterol diet and not resulting in increased caloric intake, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

How to eat walnuts

How to eat walnuts

Rats are thought to eat just about anything that they come across, which is true for the most part because they are true scavengers. However, not everything that a rat finds and then eats is good for them. So, as the owner of a pet rat, you may be wondering whether rats can eat walnuts. The short answer is yes, rats can eat walnuts. There are a few benefits that rats can reap by eating walnuts, but there are also a few considerations to make before giving your rat walnuts at all. Let’s discuss these things here.

The Benefits of Feeding Walnuts to Rats

How to eat walnuts

Image Credit: Piqsels

Walnuts are a rich source of protein for rats, which can help keep them strong and healthy as they age. These nuts also happen to be packed with healthy vitamins and minerals that rats need for good health, including B6 and E vitamins, phosphorous, and folic acid. Walnuts are also rich in antioxidants, which are important for staving off health problems like cancer.

Walnuts offer a boost of energy that rats can rely on to actively get through their day. They are also quite filling, which can help keep food costs down for your furry little friend as time goes on. Most rats happen to love the taste and texture of walnuts, which makes this food ideal for training time.

Considerations to Make When Feeding Walnuts to Rats

How to eat walnuts

Image Credit: level17-design, Pixabay

While walnuts are good for rats, feeding a rat too many of them can lead to problems. For one thing, walnuts are full of healthy fats, which can lead to the good health of a rat. However, if a rat eats too many walnuts regularly, it could end up becoming obese and developing problems such as heart disease or diabetes.

Therefore, walnuts must make up only a small percentage of a rat’s diet. Walnuts should be offered occasionally, as snacks and treats. Alternatively, they can be reserved for training sessions. Walnuts are just one of the many healthy foods that you can feed your pet rat throughout their lifetime.

Other Healthy Foods That Rats Can Eat

How to eat walnuts

Image Credit: Kira Hoffmann

Rats are omnivores, meaning that they eat both animal and plant foods to stay healthy throughout their lifetimes. This is the case for both wild and domesticated rats. To ensure that a rat gets all the necessary vitamins and minerals for good health, it is a good idea to utilize a commercial pet food that is formulated specifically for rats. This commercial food can make up about 75% of your rat’s diet overall, as it is designed to provide all essential nutrients that a rat needs to thrive.

Keep in mind that offering only human foods to rats can create nutrient deficiencies that can negatively affect their health in the future. That said, there is no reason to completely keep human foods away from your rat. Here are the healthiest options to consider:

How to eat walnuts

By now we all know that what we eat has an impact on our overall health, and everything from a serving of popcorn to a helping of fruit and vegetables can boost general bodily functions. But some foods actually do a little more. According to recent research published in the journal Nutrients, walnuts have more than just the usual health benefits — eating this snack could also help lengthen your lifespan.

“What we’ve learned from this study is that even a few handfuls of walnuts per week may help promote longevity, especially among those whose diet quality isn’t great to begin with. It’s a practical tip that can be feasible for a number of people who are looking to improve their health, which is top of mind for many people,” Yanping Li, the lead investigator from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, said in a media release.

How to eat walnutsCredit: Tom Hermans/Unsplash

The researchers gathered data over the course of 20 years from 67,014 women who were an average of 64 years in age, originally found in the Nurses’ Health Study. The team then studied 26,326 men from information in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. After looking into this data and the other from a survey on the groups’ walnut consumption, the scientists found that those who ate above five servings of walnuts each week had a 14 per cent decrease in death from health-related causes. Plus, there was a 25 per cent less chance of death specifically from cardiovascular disease and about one year-and-a-half boost in life expectancy when people eat walnuts than when they do not.

Even if consumers would like to improve other areas of their eating habits, the study authors noted that if people eat half a serving of walnuts each day, the risk of death still lowers by 12 per cent and heart disease is decreased by 26 percent. Overall, most study participants who ate walnuts also had a generally healthy diet, exercised, consumed multivitamins, and periodically drank alcohol. While the team uncovered these findings, more research will help definitively tie walnut consumption and extended life expectancy.

This story first appeared on www.marthastewart.com

(Main and Feature Image Credit: Péter Gulyás / EyeEm / Getty Images)

How to eat walnuts

It’s actually food for thought! Walnuts have what it takes be an integral part of your superfood diet. These brain-like fruits of the walnut tree grow in shells that can be cracked open to be roasted or eaten raw. Like other nuts, walnuts are also known for their health benefits. They are rich in omega-3 fats and other nutrients, making them a great addition to our dietary habits (via Healthline). The high antioxidant amounts in walnuts also helps prevent cancer, heart disease, and even improve brain health (via Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition).

Although walnuts are popular as snacks, they also have other uses. Per Healthline, they are used to make walnut oil, which is used as salad dressing. Walnuts are also known for their nutrition profile. Besides 2.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acid, an ounce of walnuts contains 4 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, and 45 milligrams of magnesium, making it a popular choice as a versatile and healthy snack (via California Walnuts).

The health benefits are just too good to miss out on. No wonder it’s a favorite — in 2019, the per capita walnut consumption in the U.S. stood at 5.4 pounds (via Statistica). Popularity aside, what happens when you eat walnuts regularly? How does your body respond to this habit, and are there any health benefits associated with eating walnuts every day?

Eating walnuts every day might benefit your gut and heart health

How to eat walnuts

The walnut is a powerhouse of nutrients, which is one reason why researchers have long studied it. A 2019 study from Pennsylvania State University published in the Journal of Nutrition revealed that people who replaced saturated fats with walnuts experienced cardiovascular health benefits and improved blood pressure. Scientists also discovered that the improvements in heart health after consuming walnuts were linked to improvement in gut health as well.

“The walnut diet enriched a number of gut bacteria that have been associated with health benefits in the past,” explained Professor Kristina Petersen, one of the investigators of the study (via Medical News Today). “We also saw enrichment in Eubacteria eligens and Butyricicoccus,” says Petersen. The presence of this bacteria, as explained by researchers, can affect blood pressure. An increase in the amount of this bacteria in the body indicated a lower risk of heart disease in individuals.

With ample nutrients and great heart and gut benefits, walnuts are a great snack to munch on. Maybe it’s time to check out one of the many delicious recipes out there containing walnuts!

How to eat walnuts

While you may not think of this nutritious nut as the most obvious choice for pre-bedtime snack, Cassetty says that walnuts pack a number of nutritional perks that make them both great for your health overall and help promote a restful night of sleep. We chatted with Cassetty to learn more about all of the above.

The many walnut benefits for restful sleep (and overall health)

“Walnuts contain more ALA—an anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid—than any other nut,” says Cassetty. “Additionally, a serving of walnuts contains 4 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, and 11 percent of your daily magnesium requirement. They also supply a considerable amount of antioxidants, such as polyphenols, which have a beneficial effect on your gut health and reduce your risk of chronic disease.”

And while you could (and should) snack on walnuts at any point of the day, Cassetty is particularly keen on eating walnuts before bed. “Walnuts contain numerous compounds that are tied to healthy sleep patterns,” she says. “They’re a good source of tryptophan, an amino acid that your body uses to produce serotonin and melatonin, and both of these substances are involved in regulating your sleep.”

Further, walnuts actually contain melatonin, the hormone that governs your sleep-wake cycle that is necessary for quality sleep. So rather than taking melatonin pills, you could try snacking on a few walnuts to get your fix. Working hand-in-hand with melatonin, Cassetty notes, is the magnesium in walnuts. This relaxing mineral helps induce deep sleep. “If you think of your brain as having an on/off switch, magnesium is part of the machinery that turns the switch off. This helps you fall asleep; meanwhile, the rise in melatonin levels are making you feel sleepy, too,” she says. “They work in different ways, but they both facilitate quality sleep.”

Finally, because walnuts are an all-natural ingredient that are packed with healthy fats and fiber, they can also serve as the cornerstone to a well-balanced diet that promotes better sleep overall. “A diet that’s high in saturated fat and added sugar but low in fiber has been linked with sleep disturbances,” Cassetty points out. “On the other hand, a higher fiber diet that is lower in sugar and saturated fat may help with deeper, more restorative sleep. On top of supplying nutrients that are related to better sleep, walnuts fit into this dietary pattern perfectly, so they’re working numerous angles.”

What is the ideal amount of walnuts to consume?

Short answer: The limit does not exist. Maintaining your fatty nut intake is important, both before bed and throughout the day. According to Cassetty, “The reality is that most people could benefit from swapping one or two of their regular snacks with some walnuts. One study found that simply adding two ounces—or two servings—of walnuts per day for six months led to a more nutritious diet.” This is why she says that eating at least a couple servings per day, which works out to around 7 to 14 walnuts total, is ideal. Be that as it may, Cassetty maintains that variety is key to a healthy diet, and that your walnuts should be supplemented with other wholesome foods. She strongly emphasizes the importance of consuming a range of whole or minimally-processed plant foods like veggies, fruits, whole grains, and beans.

Delicious, RD-approved ways to eat walnuts

Luckily, walnuts are a highly versatile ingredient that work in both savory and sweet recipes, either as a core component or a garnish. Cassetty recommends eating them in their most natural form (i.e. raw), and using them to top yogurt parfaits, overnight oats, or salads. “You can also blend them into smoothies or whirl them into a dip,” she suggests.

If you’re looking for a creative application of walnuts, Cassetty adds her walnuts to a watermelon feta salad. “This three-ingredient salad has a wonderful combination of flavors and textures, and it is so nutritious,” she says. “Another favorite is a salad made with arugula, roasted beets, goat cheese, and walnuts. You can add roasted chicken or chickpeas—or both—to make this a main dish.”

Bottom line? Getting a good night’s rest is more crucial than ever, and noshing on walnuts is one delicious way to help get you there. “I think it’s empowering to learn that something as simple as upgrading your snack to include walnuts has the potential to have an impact on your mood, sleep, and well-being,” Cassetty says. “It’s common to think that you have to trade convenience or taste for healthfulness when eating, but there are no trade-offs with walnuts.” Next time you find yourself searching for a suitable bedtime snack, let your slippers guide you right over to your walnut stash.

Want more RD-approved tips on eating before bed? Watch this video here:

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In this article I am going to explain how to eat different types of walnuts.

Walnuts are an exceptionally nutritious and delicious nut; you can include walnuts in almost anything you can imagine with their versatility. Either on its own as a snack, in a bowl of salad, or even incorporated into your desserts.

Here are some ways you can enjoy walnuts.

How to eat walnuts

Different Types of Walnuts and How to Consume Them

Did you know that there are different types of walnuts that you can enjoy? Here are several types of walnuts that you may or may not know. From black walnuts to pickled walnuts, choose one that is suitable for your taste.

Black walnuts and green walnuts right off the trees

If you have never heard of green walnuts, they are just young unripe walnuts before they mature. Black walnuts, on the other hand, are the ripe version that is commonly found in North America.

Unfortunately, walnuts are not something that you can eat straight from the tree-like fruits. To eat it, first, you need to remove the husks, wash them, and shell them because walnuts are protected by very thick husks and shells.

Then after you shelled them, you can eat either both green and black walnuts raw, the taste is rather subtle and bland, and the texture is crunchy.

But if you really want to eat them properly and prefer to have more flavor, you can toast them.

Wild walnuts

What is meant by wild walnuts are walnuts you find anywhere. They are safe to eat because most of the time they are probably a variation of the black walnuts we have mentioned earlier.

The way you eat it is like the previous section: husk them, wash them, then shell them. Give them a toast if you want to bring out more flavor or eat it raw if you are not in the mood to cook.

Pickled walnuts

Pickled walnuts are traditional English pickles made from green walnuts that are brined until they are dark in color and then pickled in a pickling solution such as vinegar or spices and sugar.

They have a strong taste and a grainy texture, so you might want to keep your consumption on the lighter side. One of the best ways It can be eaten is together as part of a cheese and cold cuts tray.

The rich cheese and cold cuts are a great combination with the grainy, tangy walnuts.

Soaked walnuts

Soaked walnuts are walnuts that have been soaked for up to overnight in water with a little bit of salt. The good thing is the soaked walnuts are usually easier to digest.

To make this, soak your walnuts for a minimum of 2 hours up to overnight, then rinse and enjoy. You can combine the walnuts into your salads, as a snack, or even on desserts.

Daily Recommendation For Eating Walnuts

Walnuts are great for your health, which is probably why you would want to consume them every day as a part of your daily diet.

They are rich in fiber, fat, vitamins, and minerals – this means if you consume them every day, you will be full for a longer time, and is good for your heart, hair, and skin.

The recommended daily intake for walnuts is 28 grams or 1 oz which is equivalent to ¼ cup of walnuts or around 12 walnuts.

We recommend that you consume more soaked walnuts instead of raw because they are much easier to digest compared to raw walnuts.

Incorporate walnuts into your daily diet easily by using one of these options:

  • As a portable snack, you bring around
  • On green salads
  • On slices of bread together with jams or cheese
  • Roasted with meat
  • Incorporated into stir-fries
  • In a dessert, such as walnut cheesecakes

Rule on Eating Walnuts: soaked or not soaked?

As mentioned, you can both soak your walnuts or not soak walnuts. It is just that soaked walnuts can be digested faster and have more nutrients than unsoaked walnuts, which means it is the best way that you can eat walnuts.

If you are planning to eat walnuts directly or dry, which is consuming them without soaking, you may not get several nutrients and the texture will be harder; so, make sure you dice them up nicely to not damage your teeth.

The Best Time to Eat Walnuts

As mentioned, the best time to eat walnuts is when you have them first thing in the morning. Make sure that they are soaked walnuts though, so it is easier to digest.

It is ideal to be eaten on an empty stomach because it improves your cholesterol levels and gives you protein and fiber.

But be mindful not to drink too much water afterward, because it could slow down the digestion process. Give it about 30 minutes to 1 hour, or if you do need a drink then make it a sip of lukewarm water.

Weirdly enough, walnuts are also good to consume before you go to bed or as a late-night snack. Walnuts are proven to help you to sleep better thanks to melatonin and healthy fats.

So, leave some of your daily recommended walnut quotas at night, and eat a few pieces before bed for a good night’s sleep.

Another factor you need to think about is the season: summer or winter. You should limit your intake during the summer months due to them generating heat inside your body, which can make your summer months even harder.

So maybe, if you want to eat walnuts in the summer you can do it at night. On the other hand, you can consume more walnuts during winter to keep yourself warm.