Categories
Over-the-Counter-Medications

How to fix a radiator

Though it might not be the worst damage your 4WD vehicle may suffer out on the trail, even a tiny hole in your radiator is enough to bring your mighty 4×4 to a complete stop.

With no coolant flowing through the engine to keep it cool, you risk permanently engine damage.

The big question is, what do you do when this happens miles from home?

Well, if you have the following creative little tricks up your sleeve, you can probably fix that leak long enough to slowly drive back home or to your favorite repair shop!

1. A Can of Bar’s Leak or Silver Seal

Bar’s Leak for cooling systems is a thick, goopy, gritty liquid that’s specifically made to put in your radiator to stop any leaks throughout your cooling system.

It allows you to keep on going while plugging up small leaks so you can top off your fluid again and get back home to do a full repair.

Silver Seal is a similar product, though it’s a powder and not a liquid.

In either case, it’s a good idea to have a can of one of these in your repair kit when you go off road for just such an emergency.

2. A Low-Pressure Radiator Cap

Engine cooling systems run under very high pressure to keep the coolant flowing through the radiator and all those hoses.

You can slow or stop a small leak by reducing the pressure on the system with a low pressure radiator cap, which should prevent the fluid from being pushed out of the leak.

Use a low pressure cap only as a temporary fix to get you to the repair shop; avoid putting too much strain on the engine since cooling efficiency will be reduced.

3. A Pair of Needle Nose Pliers

If your truck or Jeep has flat fin-style radiator tubes, you can use a pair of needle-nose pliers to temporarily close off a leaky tube long enough to get you to safety.

Do it by cutting the damaged tube completely in half, then crimping both ends and folding each end over itself multiple times, pinching it closed with the pliers each roll, until there is no longer any fluid leaking out.

4. Some Chewed Bubble Gum

Another quick fix for stopping the leak until you can slowly drive your off-road truck back home and to a repair shop is plugging the hole with thoroughly worked chewing gum.

For this idea to work, it should be freshly chewed gum that’s still pretty soft as you’ll need to cram it through the opening where the fluid is escaping.

If you get the leak slowed or stopped this way, take the radiator cap off to release pressure on the system and proceed slowly.

5. Pepper or Egg Whites

As odd as both of these may sound, they work the same way that Bar’s Leak does by clogging up a small opening from the inside as the pressurized coolant is pushed through.

Add the separated whites of 4 or 5 eggs into the radiator or ¼ to ½ cup of pepper for the fix.

Like all of these other ideas, this is only a temporary fix that will keep your cooling system working enough for you to drive your 4×4 back home or to the mechanical shop and then follow up with a proper repair.

Don’t think everything is just fine if the leak stops and everything seems normal.

Don’t Let Surprise Radiator Leaks Stop You On The Trail

Preparedness is the name of the game if you like to go off-road and that goes for your vehicle as well as you.

A radiator leak may seem pretty benign, especially if you have spare fluid in the truck or Jeep with you; however, letting it go can turn into a serious issue that could possibly cause serious engine damage.

Though some of them may sound weird, these temporary repairs can work long enough on small radiator leaks so you can turn back and get your prized off-road truck some attention before any additional damage is caused.

Keep some of these items in your emergency repair kit for a quick fix plus some of the eggs and pepper might make a good lunch when fried up with a camping stove, too!

How to fix a radiator

Radiator leaks are common problems in various vehicles, and they need to be addressed promptly. Some of the indications of this issue include a low coolant level in the radiator, a dry overflow reservoir, or an overheating engine. Often, all you’d need is a radiator repair and not a replacement. You may not even have to drive your car to a repair shop. Aside from learning how to know if you have a clogged radiator , you should also study fixing simple leaks. After all, this can help you avoid costly repairs down the road.

Why do Radiator Leaks Occur?

It is possible for the leak to happen in various locations. For instance, in the radiator itself, there may be damage or corrosion to its core, allowing the coolant to leak out. If the issue is moderate to heavy, you may need to consider replacing your radiator. However, it gets a bit complicated when the leak comes from the hoses or lines. When they have cracks or holes, the cooling system may allow the coolant to leak. Keep in mind that over time, hoses get brittle, prompting them to start cracking.

It is also possible that the leak is coming from the hose connection points. If the clamps get loose or break, pressurized coolant will start to seep out. If the hoses of your radiator get extremely loose, they will pop off entirely, causing a major coolant leak. Before you attempt a radiator repair , ensure that the coolant and your engine have cooled down. Since the coolant is pressurized when hot, it can cause serious injuries. When you’re ready, follow the steps below:

First Step: Identify the Source of the Radiator Leak

When you see a coolant drip on your garage floor or driveway, it does not necessarily mean that you need to bring your vehicle to a service center. It is possible that you only have a loose drain valve, a leaky hose, or an overflowing reservoir. So, the first thing you need to do is identify the source of the radiator leak. You can do this by looking at the bottom of your radiator, radiator hoses, reservoir, and drain valve. You will see coolant drops collecting in one of those places.

Second Step: Determine the Gravity of the Issue

If you notice that the coolant is running instead of slowly dripping from your radiator, then it is likely that the leak is more severe. In this case, the damage may be too big to be repaired using a simple fix. It is important that you closely examine the leaking surface and check if there is a large crack in the reservoir or hose. If you think that the leak coming from your radiator is not that serious, then you have various options for stopping it.

Third Step: Using a Commercial Radiator Leak Stop Product

A radiator leak stop can fill the tiny holes in the cooling system of your vehicle. Often, it can stop a minor leak in your radiator, a hose, or overflow reservoir. You can go to an auto parts shop or a discount store and you will find this product. Simply follow the instructions in the container. Typically, the process involves pouring the contents into the radiator of your vehicle. However, make sure that the radiator is cool before you remove its cap. In some cases, the leak stop can only repair the issue temporarily. So, it is best to set your expectations accordingly.

Fourth Step: Monitor your Vehicle’s Cooling System

The leak stop product may have resolved the issue, but it is always possible for a small leak to grow bigger. So, always remember to watch the temperature gauge of your car, especially during the warmer months. Ideally, you should also perform a coolant flush on a regular basis to keep the radiator in good condition. Moreover, it will help if you examine the surface under the radiator from time to time. If you notice further leaking, then it is high time you consulted a mechanic. They should be able to check if there are other issues like power steering problems and potential brake system damages, among others.

Depending on your home's build, a radiator could be the essential system that heats the air and keeps your space comfortable. Radiators usually use a steam system that circulates the heat from water into warm air throughout a home. However, if the radiator itself starts leaking, the whole process could stop and cause damage to your home as a result. Here, a plumbing expert details why radiators can leak and how to stop them in their tracks.

Look for the cause of the leak.

The type of radiator you have will help you determine how the water leak started in the first place. "For the most part, radiators can either be made from cast iron or they can be made from copper, which is more common for hot water," says Doyle James, the president of Mr. Rooter Plumbing, a Neighborly company. "With both types of radiators, most water leaks tend to be caused by age, corrosion, or cracks." It's important to address the leak once you first see it since it (which often happens from the body of the radiator and pipes) could lead to water damage on hardwood floors, cause mold to develop on nearby walls, or discolor carpets if the water goes unnoticed for a long period of time, he adds.

sturti / Getty Images

Address the issue.

"Any issues related to water leaks can indicate a dangerous situation, since you are dealing with scalding water under pressure," says James. You essentially have two options to solve the issue based on the make of the radiator. When dealing with a cast iron radiator, James explains that you will simply have to replace it since it isn't related to how it fits in your home. Copper radiators, on the other hand, can be adjusted: "A water boiler is a sealed system, and special fittings are designed to let air out of the system to avoid 'air lock' and minimize corrosion that is accelerated by the presence of oxygen," he adds. "Those may sputter a bit as they are letting the air out, but if dripping, they should be replaced by a professional plumber."

Some radiators might need to be replaced altogether.

James explains that once most leaking radiators corrode from the inside of the unit and start leaking consistently, they will need to be replaced promptly. Plus, if you have a cast iron radiator, it will likely get brittle over time. So, if you ever start experiencing issues with this type of radiator, hiring a professional plumber will be the only way to diagnose it and get it working properly again.

Depending on your home's build, a radiator could be the essential system that heats the air and keeps your space comfortable. Radiators usually use a steam system that circulates the heat from water into warm air throughout a home. However, if the radiator itself starts leaking, the whole process could stop and cause damage to your home as a result. Here, a plumbing expert details why radiators can leak and how to stop them in their tracks.

Look for the cause of the leak.

The type of radiator you have will help you determine how the water leak started in the first place. "For the most part, radiators can either be made from cast iron or they can be made from copper, which is more common for hot water," says Doyle James, the president of Mr. Rooter Plumbing, a Neighborly company. "With both types of radiators, most water leaks tend to be caused by age, corrosion, or cracks." It's important to address the leak once you first see it since it (which often happens from the body of the radiator and pipes) could lead to water damage on hardwood floors, cause mold to develop on nearby walls, or discolor carpets if the water goes unnoticed for a long period of time, he adds.  

Address the issue.

"Any issues related to water leaks can indicate a dangerous situation, since you are dealing with scalding water under pressure," says James. You essentially have two options to solve the issue based on the make of the radiator. When dealing with a cast iron radiator, James explains that you will simply have to replace it since it isn't related to how it fits in your home. Copper radiators, on the other hand, can be adjusted: "A water boiler is a sealed system, and special fittings are designed to let air out of the system to avoid 'air lock' and minimize corrosion that is accelerated by the presence of oxygen," he adds. "Those may sputter a bit as they are letting the air out, but if dripping, they should be replaced by a professional plumber."

Some radiators might need to be replaced altogether.

James explains that once most leaking radiators corrode from the inside of the unit and start leaking consistently, they will need to be replaced promptly. Plus, if you have a cast iron radiator, it will likely get brittle over time. So, if you ever start experiencing issues with this type of radiator, hiring a professional plumber will be the only way to diagnose it and get it working properly again.

Knowing how to repair your radiator will help you stay warm during the winter months. But before you begin, it's important to know what type of radiator you have. Many older homes are heated with steam or hot water radiators, while newer homes may have convectors.

We'll walk you through basic radiator repairs: like installing a new valve, clearing the bleeder valve, and maximizing air flow. Expect to spend anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours on these projects, and make sure you're familiar with your system before you begin. Have basic tools on hand—like groove-joint pliers, a pipe wrench, and a screwdriver—plus any new parts you may need. 

Editor's Tip: You can make minor repairs to radiators, but leave problems with a boiler or piping to a professional.

Identifying Hot Water and Steam Radiators

In a steam system, steam quickly heats the radiator when the boiler fires. In a hot water system, heated water continually circulates through the radiators. A steam radiator has a small air vent near the top that emits bursts of steam when the radiator heats. Steam systems cycle between hot and cold. Most are connected to only one pipe at the floor, but some have two. You can dismantle and service a steam radiator valve if the boiler is off. It can be difficult to work on, however, because the high heat tends to seize up the pipe joints.

Hot water radiators are connected to two pipes at the floor. They maintain a constant warmth, rather than cycling between hot and cold. Before you dismantle a hot water radiator valve, you must drain the system.

How to Install a New Valve

Step 1: Tighten Nuts

If water leaks from beneath the handle, turn down the thermostat and wait for the radiator to cool. Tighten the packing nut (just under the handle) using groove-joint pliers and tighten the larger union nut using a pipe wrench. If this does not solve the problem, move on to the next step.

The radiator is the start of your car’s cooling system. Coolant from the engine travels through tubes in the radiator. These tubes are surrounded by fins designed to direct airflow. The air cools the coolant, which then travels back to the engine, allowing it to run at the proper temperature.

Radiators can develop leaks in several places. These include the hoses, seams, tubes and cores. Without a properly functioning radiator, your engine will quickly overheat. This is something you want to avoid at all costs since overheating can cause extensive engine damage.

The best way to fix a leaking radiator is to replace it. However, there are ways to temporarily fix a leaking radiator until you can get it into a shop for repair. These strategies come in handy during emergency situations.

Part 1 of 2: Locate the leak

Materials Needed

In order to safely inspect and seal the radiator, you need a couple of basic tools:

  • Cooling system pressure tester (optional)
  • Commercial radiator stop leak (optional)
  • Eggs (optional)
  • Pepper (optional)
  • Protective gloves
  • Rags
  • Safety glasses
  • Welding or soldering equipment (optional)

Step 1: Locate the leak. Before you do anything else, make an attempt to locate the leak.

There are many places coolant leaks from, so you want to make sure it is actually coming from the radiator.

Step 2: Use a pressure tester. If you can’t easily spot the leak, you can use a pressure tester on the system.

This tool pressurises the system without the engine running, making leaks easy to spot. To use the pressure tester, attach it to the radiator or reservoir using the appropriate adapter, pumping it up to 15 PSI, which should then reveal the leak.

  • Warning: Do not exceed this pressure or damage to the cooling system may occur. Pressure testers can be rented from most auto parts stores.

Part 2 of 2: Fix the leak

Step 1: Fix the leak. Once you have found the leak, you should determine the best way to fix it.

There are a several ways to temporarily do this. These include adding a bottle of cooling system sealer, an egg, black pepper or epoxy glue. In some cases, the radiator can also be soldered or welded.

The table below will give you a better sense of how each of these methods works:

  • Tip: If you are able to welder or solder, replacing the whole radiator may be the way to go

Step 2: Get your vehicle to a trained professional. Sometimes the best course of action is to have a professional examine it.

Many repairs to a leaking radiator are temporary fixes. The only permanent and safe repair is radiator replacement by a trained professional. If you added some form of stop leak to your cooling system, don’t forget to tell your technician. One of YourMechanic’s certified professionals will gladly come to your home or work to perform an installation of a new radiator.

Next Step

Schedule Car Radiator Replacement

The most popular service booked by readers of this article is Car Radiator Replacement. YourMechanic’s technicians bring the dealership to you by performing this job at your home or office 7-days a week between 7AM-9PM. We currently cover over 2,000 cities and have 100k+ 5-star reviews. LEARN MORE

A car radiator is an arranged web of tubes & fins that keep your car cool. A leak anywhere in the radiator can result in overheating. However, the process of car radiator leak repair is quite easy and simple. If your car stops due to overheating caused by such a leak, you can fix the problem

First, let’s establish the basics. Your car’s engine needs to burn fuel in order to work, this process naturally produces increased levels of heat. Therefore, the engine needs to be cooled. If the engine is overheated the pistons don’t break down and terminate the system. This is where the car radiator – a part of the engine’s cooling system comes in. If the radiator gets overheated, the coolant inside it will leak.

Let’s go through a simple car radiator leak repair process. This may not require assistance from a professional and you can do it yourself.

How to Fix Your Car Radiator (DIY)

How to fix a radiator

Let the radiator cool off before opening the clamp

If the problem isn’t major, you can easily fix the car radiator yourself. But before you attempt a car radiator DIY fix make sure the coolant and engine have cooled down. You don’t want to open the coolant clamp and get hot coolant on your skin.

Follow these steps to fix your car radiator yourself:

Step 1: Identify the Source of Leak

Fill in the coolant tank and drive around for 15 to 20 minutes, then park your car in an open space that can be a park or your personal garage. Now, look for any leaks, if there are leaks or if you can smell the coolant then that means it’s coming from the radiator.

Identify the source of the radiator leak. The leak might be due to a car’s loose drain valve, a reservoir that is overflowing or a leakage in a hose.

Step 2: Determine the Intensity of the Problem

Once you figure out the source of the leak, determine the gravity of the issue. If the coolant is running out of the car instead of dripping slowly, the leak is severe. Examine the leaking surface closely, check for large cracks in the hose or reservoir.

If you think the leak isn’t all that serious, you can fix this problem yourself. But if that is not the case, you will have to take your car to a service centre.

Step 3: Use a Radiator Leak Stop

If there are tiny holes in the cooling system, you can fill them with a radiator leak stop. Using a radiator leak stop is often the best fix for stopping a minor leak in your radiator, hose, or overflowing reservoir. You can easily find this product at any auto part store or you can buy radiator leak stop products online. Make sure you read the instructions before using them.

Generally, you have to pour the contents of the leak stop product into the car’s radiator. Make sure the radiator has cooled off before you open the clamp.

Step 4: Monitor Your Car’s Cooling System

It is possible that your car’s radiator leak issue is resolved with the leak stop product, but a small leak can always go bigger. Remember to check the temperature gauge of your car, especially during summers. You should also perform a coolant flush regularly to keep the radiator in good condition. Examining the surface beneath the radiator often also helps.

Remember, you must always do a regular car radiator check because, with time, your vehicle gets old and so do the components in your car. Monitoring the car coolant levels and the radiator’s condition are among popular tips to keep your car radiator cool and away from unforeseen situations like an engine blowing up and keeps you safe.

Why Does a Car Radiator Fail or Stop Working

How to fix a radiator

Car radiators basically stop working effectively when there is a radiator leak

The main reason for a car radiator to stop working is a coolant leak, also known as the car radiator leak. There are many causes of such leaks.

If you don’t check the coolant levels at all, the engine radiator and hoses get clogged and rusty such corrosion develops small holes also called pinhole leaks in the radiator. This will end up in engine coolant loss. To put it simply it will cause the leak, triggering an urgent need for car radiator repair – or worse, an urgent need to replace it. Besides, road debris also plays a huge role in corroding the radiator.

Sometimes, your car’s entire radiator becomes useless due to heavy corrosion. A radiator leak can also happen when the coolant clamp isn’t tight or breaks or if the hoses of your car’s radiator get really loose and pop out.

That is all about car radiator leak repair. Remember, overheating can be a sign of other severe problems as well. If your car keeps heating despite multiple radiator and engine repairs, it may be time to find another car. Take a look at these used cars for sale in the UAE:

Explore the various auto brands and buy the car that suits you best.

Stay tuned to the UAE’s top auto blog for more information on car DIYS, auto technology, car parts and accessories.

If you see a puddle of liquid under your car and think it could be coolant, you might have a radiator leak. The best way to proceed is to find out for sure what kind of leak it is, and then fix it! Otherwise, if you try to drive your car and it turns out the coolant is leaking, you could end up overheating your car and causing expensive damage to the engine. Luckily, learning how to fix a radiator leak only takes minutes. Here’s how to get started.

How to fix a radiator

Radiator Leak Repair: Get Ready to Inspect the Car

First, you want to make sure the liquid is actually coming from your radiator, so be prepared to spend a few minutes looking for the leak. Keep in mind that the coolant may be hot and can damage your skin or eyes if it gets on you, so wear gloves and safety glasses to be on the safe side—and only inspect your car when the engine is cold.

Radiator Leak Repair: Find the Leak

Now it’s time to find the leak. You might initially think the coolant is coming from your radiator, but it could also be coming from a radiator hose or clamp. The easiest way to determine this is to visually inspect the radiator until you see where the coolant is coming from. If it seems to be coming from a loose clamp, you can simply tighten it to stop the leak. And if it’s coming from a radiator hose, you can replace it. But if it’s clear the leak is in the radiator itself, you can typically fix it within minutes.

How to fix a radiator

How to Fix a Radiator Leak

Knowing how to fix a radiator leak involves learning your options and then choosing the right one for you. You should know that the most popular—and easiest—way to fix a radiator leak is to use a stop-leak product that you simply pour into the radiator. For example, AlumAseal Radiator Stop Leak & Conditioner can quickly fill any small holes in the cooling system. Once you pour it in, you can check your coolant level and top it off if necessary, and then get on with your day—knowing your radiator leak has been fixed!

If you don’t have any stop-leak products on hand when you notice the radiator leak, there are a couple of alternative ways to temporarily stop the leak so you can safely drive to the store to get some. One option is to use egg yolks. This may sound odd, but the eggs will congeal enough to seal tiny leaks, and the effect should last long enough for you to get ahold of a better option, like AlumAseal. Just note that you have to separate the egg whites from the yolks of about four eggs, and then pour just the yolks into the cooling system. Then start your engine to help the eggs go far enough in the system and start to congeal.

Note that black pepper will have the same effect, since if you pour about half a pepper shaker’s worth of this substance into the cooling system, it will seal the leak. Just keep in mind that both eggs and black pepper are temporary fixes and should never be used as a permanent way to stop a radiator leak. They should allow you just enough time to pick up a stop-leak product so you can fix the issue.

Of course, some radiator leaks require more serious help that only a mechanic can provide. For instance, if you check for leaks and see that your coolant is running out of your radiator, not just dripping, it may be time to take your car to the repair shop. But for most radiator leaks, a simple stop-leak product should take care of the problem!

How to fix a radiator

Most radiator leaks aren’t serious, but they can stain your carpets, cause your radiators to rust and affect your heating system’s efficiency if they are left unattended. To fix any leaks, you will first need to identify where they are coming from. Below, we’ve listed some of the most common reasons why radiators leak and talk you through how to fix each one in just a few simple steps.

Identify where the leak is coming from

Radiator leaks can come from a number of different places, so you’ll need to figure this out before you can begin any repair work. To do this, dry your radiator completely using a towel and place some tissue roll over each fixture. If one part of the radiator soaks the tissue roll, you’ve found the source of your leak.

Where do leaks come from?

Body (corrosion)

Sediment and minerals from unfiltered water will build up over time if they are left untreated. This will lead to corrosion inside your radiator, causing water to leak from the body (or the affected area).

Valves

If you find that your radiator valve is leaking, this is likely due to damage in the internal spindle packing. However, leaks will only occur when the valve is open and stop when it is closed. Valve leaks are relatively common and are easy to fix.

Spindles

The spindle connects your radiator to the pipework and is often the main cause of a leak if it becomes damaged or loose.

Glands

A radiator gland is a small fixture that lives underneath the plastic lid of the valve. If you fix your valve and it’s still leaking, the issue may be the gland.

Pipe joints

If you have a compression heating system, you will have a series of joints connecting your radiator to the pipes. If these become loose, leaks will occur.

Each of these parts will require a slightly different method to fix, so read the instructions listed below carefully.

What do you need to fix a radiator leak?

A spanner, a flat-head screwdriver, PTFE tape, towels and bowls.

How to repair.

How to repair a leaking valve

To repair a leaking valve, you will have to drain the system to below where the leak is coming from. Once you’ve done this, turn off the lockshield valve (which has the plastic cap) and the supply valve (where water enters). Remember to count how many turns you make to close the lockshield valve completely.

Next, place towels and bowls underneath the radiator and undo the union nut. Once you’ve done this, turn the bleed valve to release any water and wrap the tip of the valve in tape (preferably PTFE). Now, re-tighten the union nut and open the lockshield and bleed valves. Once your radiator has filled up again, check to make sure there are no leaks. If you’re certain the issue has been fixed, close the bleed valve.

How to repair a spindle

A simple problem to repair, all you need here is a spanner to tighten the gland nut. However, if the leaking doesn’t stop after you’ve tightened this, undo the gland nut again and wrap some PTFE tape around the spindle.

If this fails as well, you may have confused a spindle leak with a valve leak, so follow the instructions we have listed above. Alternatively, call a plumber and see if they can offer further guidance.

How to repair a gland

If you have followed our instructions on how to fix a valve but your radiator is still leaking, the issue might actually be with the gland. However, this is a simple fix if you have some PTFE tape.

First, turn on the valve and see if any water leaks from underneath the cap. If it does, turn off the lockshield valve as well. After removing the cap, unscrew the gland nut and wrap a 20cm piece of tape around the spindle. Using a flat-head screwdriver, force the tape into the body of the valve before screwing the gland nut back on. Finally, replace the cap and switch on the valve.

How to repair a pipe joint

Most modern central heating systems use compression valves to join pipes to radiators. If one of these starts to leak, the valve can be tightened with a spanner.

However, if the leak doesn’t stop, drain the system to below the source of your leak and undo the nut at the joint of the leaking pipe. Next, pull the pipe free and wrap some PTFE tape around it. Finally, re-tighten the nut.

Can leaks be fixed if they’re caused by corrosion?

Unfortunately, if your radiator is leaking from its body as a result of corrosion, you will need to replace your entire radiator. In the meantime, there is a temporary fix you can do.

It’s possible to add a plastic resin sealant to a feed and expansion tank to stem the water flow. However, you can’t use sealant in a sealed central heating system.

Is the valve still leaking?

If your radiator valve is still leaking after you’ve followed the different methods above, you will probably need to replace it. Before you replace a radiator valve, make sure you purchase the same one. You will then need to:

1. Drain all water from your heating system.
2. Unscrew any nuts that connect the water pipe to the valve using a spanner. You will also need to completely unscrew and remove the old valve.
3. Gently clean the valve threads and wind them with your new valve.
4. Screw this into the radiator and refill your heating system. Note: you may need to bleed the radiator to remove any trapped air.

If you’re unsure which radiator valve you need, contact the experts at Just Radiators today. We stock a range of different valves, including angled, corner, manual, square and straight options.

Is the valve still leaking?

As touched on briefly above, there are many materials and finishes to choose from when picking out the perfect radiator for your kitchen. Traditional radiators, which are made of ceramic, remain a popular choice for many households, but other types such as steel are fast becoming the go-to.

You can also choose from other materials and finishes such as cast iron, wooden, aluminium, and chrome. Overall, it just requires a bit of browsing online to find the perfect radiator for your kitchen. There’s plenty to choose from!

Again, it depends on the overall style and tone of your kitchen; ceramic heaters are quite bulky, for instance, and so are perhaps not suitable for a kitchen otherwise contemporary and sleek, and vice versa with steel, minimal radiators.