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How to fix leaking pipes

Plumbing is something that freaks most of us out. We don’t understand the intricacies of how pipes and flushes work. We would rather let the professionals handle it than get our hands dirty. However, there are certain situations where you can DIY the repairs. Yes, you.

How to fix leaking pipesImage credit: [email protected]

It’s actually not that complicated. Minor leakages can happen for several reasons. Sometimes, the joints between the pipes become loose or the seals are old and no longer work. Patching them up is easy and here’s how you can go about it.

Before You Get Started

Run your hands over your pipes in order to detect where the leaks have sprung. Usually, you’ll be able to feel it with your hands much better as some pipes may be located in dark places, like under your sink.

Always shut off the main water supply before you fix the leak and leave it off for at least 4 hours after you have treated the leaky area in order to let the patching dry and set. Some methods require you to leave the water turned off for longer, up to 12 hours.

After you have shut the water, wipe the pipes dry before beginning. Here’s what you can use to secure leaky pipes:

1. Epoxy Resin

Epoxy is a type of plastic based putty that becomes solid when it dries. You can find these putties sold in little rolls at hardware stores. Once you spread it around a leak, it will patch any pinholes or cracks as it dries, which takes 3 or 4 hours. Epoxy resin is a very flexible material and can be used both for metal and PVC pipes.

How to fix leaking pipesImage credit: Epoxy Products

2. Adhesive Sealing Tape

There are many adhesive sealing tapes available for your pipes. Get one that is at least 1.5 – 2.0 cm in width so that you can cover as much area as possible. Tapes are great for leaky joints and most of these tapes are soft and pliable. They will adapt to the shape of the pipe joint. You don’t have to wait long for it to set and can turn on your water supply almost immediately.

The only downside is that sealing tapes can solve minor or pinhole leaks, but won’t be enough for more major ones.

How to fix leaking pipesImage credit: Tommy Tape

3. Metal or Rubber Clamp

These types of clamps are very useful for metal pipes. Basically they are long cylindrical shaped seals made of metal and padded with rubber, or made or rubber alone. At both ends of the short tube are metal clamps that can be tightened to for a tight grip through which no water can escape.

How to fix leaking pipesImage credit: Home Improvement

4. Cold or Heat Shrink Sleeves

Polymer sleeves that shrink are available to fix parts of your pipe where you can fit these sleeves through. These sleeves will be able to adhere to the pipes and seal them. However these sleeves are not very strong so you can only use it if there’s a single leak without heavy water pressure.

How to fix leaking pipesImage credit: GlobalSpec

When your leaks become unmanageable, you can always call upon the plumbers here at Kaodim to ‘Kaodim’ things for you. No pipe repair is too small for them and you’ll be able to contact several plumbers at one time, increasing your chances of finding one that suits your availability and budget.

Finding a leaking pipe can be a real nightmare. Aside from potentially causing water damage in your home, it’s likely to also affect your boiler pressure, central heating and hot water supply.

Most people tend to call a plumber when they have a pipe leak. If you have home emergency insurance with Hometree, the cost of repairs to your pipes will be covered by your policy. We’ll get a qualified plumber out to you ASAP (within 24 hours) and offer both evening and weekend appointments for your convenience.

But you don’t necessarily need to wait for a professional plumber to repair your pipe leak. If it’s a minor leak with an easy fix, you may be able to do it yourself. At the very least you may be able to temporarily stop it, until it can be properly repaired.

Here we’ll provide a quick guide to fixing a leaking pipe. As always, only carry out DIY repairs if you are confident in doing so and have the correct tools. It’s worth bearing in mind that you may void some insurance policies if you cause additional damage to your pipework when attempting a repair.

Turn off the water supply

Before attempting to fix leaking pipe work in your home, you should always turn the water supply off. This can either be done at the water valve on the pipe, closest to the leak, or at the stopcock, which is probably located under your kitchen sink. Usually, you can turn the water supply off by hand but you may need a flat-head screwdriver to tackle a water valve.

Drain the taps

Our next piece of advice is to completely drain all of the water from the leaking pipe, so you aren’t hit with more water unexpectedly. Turn on the taps sourced by the pipe. When the water stops flowing from the taps and the pipe, you know it’s all gone.

We then suggest drying off the pipe with a towel and covering your floor to protect it.

Identifying the cause of the leak

Different types of leaks have different fixes. Take a look at the pipe and see if you can work out why it is leaking. Here we’ve shared a few tips on how to stop a leaking pipe with relatively easy fixes.

Loose joint – If it’s just a cause of having a loose pipe joint, you’ll simply need to tighten it up. Some joints in pipework can be tightened by hand but it’s worth having a spanner handy, just in case.

Crack or split pipe – If the pipe has cracked or split, it’s likely to be as a result of corrosion. However, pipes can also split if accidentally hit during DIY work.

The severity of the damage will decide whether the pipe can be repaired or whether it needs replacing. You may be able to do a temporary ‘stop-gap’ repair using one of the methods below.

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How to fix leaking pipes

How to seal a leaky pipe

Tape – If you need a quick, temporary fix for a leaky pipe in an emergency, we suggest grabbing some waterproof duct tape. Make sure the pipe is bone-dry and apply the tape. Keep wrapping it tightly around the pipe until it is completely sealed.

Epoxy paste – You could also try covering the crack with epoxy paste and rubber. Wait for it to set and it should temporarily stop the leak.

Self-tapping plugs – Most DIY and hardware stores sell pipe patch kits and self-tapping plugs. These are plugs you can insert into the hole in your pipe and they will expand to fit them.

Whichever temporary fix you go for don’t be too quick to turn your water back on. Leave it at least an hour or two to give the repair time to set.

How to fix a copper pipe leak at the joint

Threaded pipes and copper fittings are prone to leaks. To prevent future problems or repair a current leak, we recommend that you seal them with either Teflon tape i.e. plumber’s tape or a spray sealant for water leaks.

Believe it or not, there’s a right and a wrong way to use Teflon tape. It needs to be wrapped around the pipe in the opposite direction of how the pipe turns into the fitting. Follow the steps below on how to use plumbers tape correctly:

  1. Clean the pipe with a clean rag
  2. Place the end of the pipe leak tape on the second thread from the end of the pipe and hold it in place
  3. Wrap the tape around the pipe in the opposite direction to the way the pipe turns into the fitting
  4. Make sure the pipe leak tape is wrapped tightly and overlap it as you go
  5. Wrap it around 4-6 times
  6. Break the tape off and smooth down over your pipe
  7. Leave for an hour or two before turning the water back on

If you like, you can use a spray sealant for water leaks in addition to the plumber’s tape to make the pipework even more resilient. You can pick up a spray sealant from your local hardware store or online.

Don’t leave a pipe temporarily fixed for too long

Temporary fixes can last years but that doesn’t mean they should. Even if you manage to temporarily fix your pipe, if there is an on-going problem like corrosion, it’s only a matter of time before it starts leaking again or another pipe bursts elsewhere.

Get your pipes looked at by a qualified plumber, who will be able to assess their current state. They’ll let you know if any of the pipework needs replacing and how much it’s going to cost. It’s better to prevent a pipe leak than have to deal with the inconvenience and cost of water damage caused by a burst pipe.

The best way to save money on leaking pipe repairs is to take out emergency home care. For a small monthly or annual charge, you’ll be protected for plumbing work and other home emergencies like failed central heating and faulty electrics.

To find out more information about our home care policy, which includes all of the above and more, get in touch today on 0330 912 4843.

How to fix leaking pipes

When it comes to plumbing and water leak repair, knowing when your pipes have become more trouble than they’re worth is key to keeping your home running smoothly. As your home ages, your plumbing will have its fair share of leaks, sewer backups and clogged pipes – this sort of wear and tear is a natural part of the aging process. But when pipes become brittle or old, or the problems seem to be to be growing month after month, replacement may be a better long-term solution.

When Should I Repair my Leaking Pipes?

When are repairs the best option for home plumbing? We recommend repairing pipes that:

  • have infrequent leaking or clogging problems
  • when you know the cost of the repair will last long enough to justify the cost (we can help you determine that!)
  • are newer, or have been installed in the last 20-30 years – depending on the material, age, and use, pipes may just need maintenance every now and then, not replacement.

Keep track of how often you experience plumbing problems with the fixture in question – problems that reappear regularly may end up being more cost-effective to replace. If you need to repair a leaking pipe, save yourself sometime and skip searching for a 'plumber near me' and contact the plumbers in Boca Raton and plumbers in Fort Lauderdale that are employed by Broward Plumbing.

When Should I Replace my Leaking Pipes?

Replacement is often the best option, especially when you live in an older home or when repairs don’t seem to solve the problems. We especially recommend replacement when:

  • your pipes contain lead components, which will cause serious health problems and contamination
  • problems occur regularly
  • your pipes are over 50 years old, or are brittle, damaged, or otherwise dangerous
  • the fixture sees heavy use, or is a critical part of your home’s infrastructure

Replacing old, leaky, or outdated piping is always the most efficient and cost-effective solution when it comes to problematic plumbing. Water leak repair can work for smaller, wear and tear issues, but when pipes are affected by the issues above, the danger for bigger breaks, damage, and cost rises exponentially.

Broward Plumbing Can Help with Pipe Leak Repair & Replacement!

Knowing whether or not your pipes need repair or replacement isn’t a question you need to answer on your own – our friendly and professional technicians are here to help answer your questions and solve your plumbing issues in a timely manner. If you live in an older property, new methods of re-piping homes and flexible, modern materials can reduce the amount of disturbance and mess that this sort of procedure used to cause.

Call us For More Information On Water Leak Repair

Broward Plumbing is available 24/7 for plumbing problems and emergencies. We use the latest in technology to help diagnose the nature and location of your plumbing problem, and then work efficiently to solve problems like clogged pipes, broken pipes, or leaky faucets. Ignoring plumbing problems can lead to thousands of dollars of emergency repairs – we always recommend using a plumber licensed in the state of Florida to help solve issues in your home. Call us at 954-516-7777 or get in touch with one of our certified plumbers.

How to fix leaking pipes

If you've noticed a musty smell near your water heater, damp drywall near your toilet, or mildew in your cabinets, you may have a plumbing leak. How you handle it depends on where this pesky leak is located.

Stopping and fixing a leaky pipe can prevent serious damage to your home. You can take some simple steps to temporarily fix a leaking pipe, and there are different set of actions you should take to rid yourself of the leak forever. In this guide, we’ll cover both solutions and let you know when it’s best to just throw some towels on the floor and call in a professional plumber near you.

The Temporary Solution: How to Stop a Plumbing Leak

Once you discover a leak, stopping it should be your first priority. Control a leak with the following steps prevents further water damage, the waste of more money to your utility bills, and can make replacing the pipe in distress a much simpler process.

Step #1: Shut off the water valve to prevent any more water flow to the leak that has been identified. If the leak is at a toilet, water heater, or sink, a valve will be present. If the leak is occurring elsewhere and no valve is visible, it would be best to go to your main water valve for the entire house and shut it off. The valve is typically located within 3 to 5 feet of where the water main enters the home.

Step #2: Remove any remaining water within the leaky pipe. In order to do this, you’ll need to turn on any faucets connected to the leaky pipe or use an air compressor to force the water out manually. Depending on the type of pipe and where the leak is, you could use gravity to help push water out too.

Step #3: Dry off any remaining condensation and water by wiping the pipe dry with a towel or cloth. You’ll want to let the pipe air dry before you address the leaking area.

Step #4: Now it’s time to seal the leak. There are a couple of ways to go about this. First, and maybe this was something your grandfather once did, but find a pencil and break the lead tip inside the leak to plug the leak up. Then find some epoxy and cover the using a putty knife. A more modern approach is to use a strong epoxy and apply it to the leaking area.

Step #5: Once the leak is stopped and the epoxy has dried, the leak should then be covered externally. Depending on what you have around the home, find some rubber or gardening hose and cut roughly 2” longer than the leak itself. If you don’t have any supplies to use at this point, with the epoxy dried this would be a good time to run out to a hardware store and get what you need. Wrap the rubber or hose around the pipe where the leak is and hold it in place. A metal hose clamps tightened to hold it in place will work great. Allow this to set for one hour.

Step #6: Apply waterproof tape around the entire area. You’re basically going to turn your pipe into a mummy. Make sure the leaking area and the rubber/hose itself is dry and then apply several layers of wrapping around the leaking area.

Step #7: Time to check your work. Turn on your valves again, and turn the water on. Let the water run for minutes and check to make sure no leak is present.

The Permanent Solution: Fixing the Plumbing Leak

Stopping a leak the DIY way we explained above does not guarantee a permanent fix to your water leakage problem. Typically when one leak is fixed, other leaks spring up. This happens in other places along the same pipe because, whether the homeowner wants to hear it or not, the whole section of pipe needs replaced due to corrosion.

We urge all homeowners to request plumbing service from us at ARS®/Rescue Rooter® once you’ve temporarily solved your leak, so our professional local plumbers can handle the task of pipe replacement. If you feel up to the challenge and want to replace the pipe yourself, these are the steps to take.

Step #1: Collect the necessary supplies you’ll need. Your shopping list should include replacement piping, emery cloth, silver solder, solder flux, a fitting brush, and a torch. Make sure you properly measure the length of pipe you will need to replace.

Step #2: Shut off the water valve to prevent any more water flow to the leak that has been identified.

Step #3: Remove any remaining water within the leaky pipe. In order to do this, you’ll need to turn on any faucets connected to the leaky pipe or use an air compressor to force the water out manually.

Step #4: Remove the damaged section of the pipe. You can do this using a hacksaw or a pipe cutter.

Step #5: Polish the existing and replacement pipes using the emery cloth and fitting brush. Remember to do this both to the outside and inside of both pipes.

Step #6: Apply a light coating of soldering flux to each side of the piping you are going to solder.

Step #7: Solder the new pipe into place. Allow the sections of piping to naturally cool.

Step #8: Turn on the water back on and check to make sure no leak is present after your repairs.

What to Do If Your Plumbing Leak is Inaccessible

Leaks behind your drywall, in your ceiling, or under your floor are best handled by professional plumbers. The sooner you call one, the better! Left unaddressed, leaky pipes can cause:

    , which affects your indoor air quality
  • Wood rot, which can ruin cabinetry and threaten the integrity of your floor and wall supports
  • Paint, drywall and wallpaper damage
  • Carpet or hard-surface flooring damage

What If I Have a Leaky Faucet or Showerhead?

Just because the water is dripping into a drain or basin, don't assume it's nothing to worry about. Over time, a leaky faucet can waste hundreds of gallons of water, cause your drain to rust and encourage mildew and mold growth.

If you've spotted a leak or suspect one you can't find, call the national plumbing experts at ARS®/Rescue Rooter® right away. We offer 7-day emergency plumbing service. This means that we are available to take your call anytime.

Stopping and fixing a leaky pipe, while two very different processes, can prevent damage to your home, your time, and your wallet by temporarily or permanently resolving the problem at hand.

Stopping the Leak (The Temporary Solution)

Upon discovering a leak, stopping the leak should be your first priority whether the plumbing project necessary to fix it is big or small. Stopping a leak with the following steps prevents further water damage, the waste of more money, and makes replacing the pipe in the future a much simpler process.

Step #1: Begin by shutting off the water valve to prevent any more water flow to the leak that has been identified.

Step #2: Turn on any faucets connected to the leaky pipe or use an air compressor to remove any water remaining within the leaky pipe.

Step #3: Eliminate all forms of condensation and remaining water by wiping the pipe dry with a towel or cloth and leaving it to air dry before address the leaking area.

Step #4: To initially seal the leak, there are two popular options:

Option 1 – An old plumber’s trick suggests sticking the tip of a sharp pencil in the hole that is causing the leak and breaking the lead tip in the hole so it plugs the hole. Then the area where the leak is should be covered with epoxy using a putty knife.

Option 2 – A more modern and less complicated option suggests simply applying epoxy to the leaking area.

Step #5: Once the leak is stopped using either Option 1 or Option 2 of Step #4, the leak should then be covered with rubber or gardening hose cut roughly two inches longer than the leak itself. Apply the rubber or hose around the leak and hold it in place with the use of metal hose clamps which are to be tightened and allowed to set for a least an hour.

Step #6: Make sure the leaking area and the rubber/hose itself is dry and then apply waterproof tape, wrapping the leaking area in several layers.

Step #7: Finally, turn on the water and check to make sure no leak is present after your repairs.

Fixing the Leak (The Permanent Solution)

While stopping a leak with the steps above is a great temporary fix for small leaks, time sensitive projects, and inexperienced individuals, it does not guarantee a permanent fix to your water leakage problem. This is due to the fact that usually when one leak is fixed, other leaks will spring up in other places because the whole section of pipe needs replaced due to corrosion. Because of this, we first recommend that you immediately contact a professional plumber after temporarily stopping a leak. However, if you feel you are capable of permanently fixing your leak, here are the steps you need to take to do so:

Step #1: Determine the length of pipe you will need to replace and head to your local plumbing or hardware store to gather the supplies you will need to complete this plumbing project: replacement piping, emery cloth, silver solder, solder flux, a fitting brush, and a torch.

Step #2: Turn on any faucets connected to the leaky pipe in question or use an air compressor to remove any water remaining within the leaky pipe.

Step #3: Using a hacksaw or a pipe cutter, remove the damaged section of pipe.

Step #4: Polish the outside and inside of both your current and replacement pipes using the emery cloth and fitting brush.

Step #5: Lightly apply soldering flux to each side of piping you are going to solder.

Step #6: Solder the new pipe into place and allow it to naturally cool.

Step #7: Finally, turn on the water and check to make sure no leak is present after your repairs.

Fixing a leaking pipe is dependent on the type of leak and your level of expertise. Some homeowners may apply temporary fixes to bide their time, while others will try to take on the repairs by themselves. Although it is possible to fix a leak on your own, it’s best to let a professional plumber handle the job. After all, plumbers are skilled and qualified at doing these types of repairs.

Even if you contact a plumber, you may still be interested in learning the mechanisms behind how to fix a leaking pipe. Below is a simple tutorial with five steps on how to fix a leaking pipe:

1. Turn off the water supply & faucet.

How to fix leaking pipes

When fixing a leaky pipe, you should always start by turning off the water supply and any faucets connected to the pipe. The reasoning is to drain the water. You don’t want to work with pipes that still have water in them, since this can impact the efficiency of the repairs.

The first step is to find the stopcock and switch off the water supply. If possible, you may turn off the valve connecting the problematic pipe. A flat-head screwdriver is useful when turning off the water valve. The location of the main water supply varies from house to house. In most cases, you can find it in the crawl space or in the basement. When you find it, turn it clockwise to stop the flow. This should temporarily stop the leak and prevent further water damage.

After shutting down your water supply, you can turn off the faucets by allowing water to run until the pipes are completely empty. Just turn the faucet on to drain the water and remember to turn it off again once you’re done.

2. Dry the pipes.

Once you have drained all the water, you will need to dry the pipes. This is because a wet pipe can be slippery to handle during the repair process. Simply find a clean cloth and use it to wipe the area surrounding the leak. Do this until the pipes are completely dry. If possible, set a cloth or a bucket underneath the leaking pipe to arrest stray drops of water from the leak.

3. Apply plumbing putty on the pipes.

The plumbing putty is a compound that can be used to fix the leaking pipes. Before handling the putty, make sure you put on a pair of nitrile or latex gloves. Epoxy putty tends to heat up and can cause pain to exposed skin. Ensure the gloves are not too thick, but still thin enough to let you work without hindrance.

Start by ripping off a piece of the epoxy putty from its tube and knead it with your fingers. The lighter exterior will mix with the darker epoxy to activate it. When the putty turns light grey, stop kneading it. Then, mould the plumbing epoxy putty around the leak, wrapping it around the pipe completely. Ensure the putty forms a ½-inch thick layer around the leak to hold it in place. Taper the putty’s edge onto the pipe to make a watertight seal. Epoxy putty works on both joints and straight pipes.

Once the plumbing epoxy putty is all mixed up, it sets quickly. Give it at least five minutes for the putty to set and solidify fully. If applied correctly, the leaking in the pipes should stop. However, the epoxy putty is just a temporary fix. You will still need to replace the pipe fully or contact a plumber as soon as possible.

How to fix leaking pipes4. Replace the leaking parts of the pipes.

For a permanent solution, you may need to substitute the damaged section of the pipe or replace the entire pipe altogether. In these instances, you will need to purchase new pipe fixtures, along with the right types of couplings to connect the pipes together.

In plumbing, a coupling is a short piece of tube that creates a watertight connection between two different parts of the pipe. They can be easily fitted in between pipes, ensuring the connection is not severed even if you cut out the damaged section of the pipe.

You can purchase both the pipes and the couplings from the local hardware store. It’s very important that you get the correct measurements for both items. For the coupling, make sure it has the same diameter as your leaking pipe, and that it’s long enough to fit into the cut-out area of the pipe. Also, make sure the coupling is made of the same material as the pipe.

5. Clamp small leaks.

Replacing the pipes is a significant investment. For smaller leaks, it may not be an affordable option to replace the entire pipe. Instead, you can use a pipe clamp to stop the leaks. A pipe clamp features a rubber gasket that creates a tight seal to secure small leaks on pipes. You can purchase a pipe clamp from your local hardware store, but make sure it has the same length and size as the leaking pipe to ensure proper fit.

Plumbing problems are one of the scariest household problems to come across. It’s because we don’t understand the intricacies of how pipes and flushes work. It’s way easier to let the professionals handle it than get our hands dirty. However, there are certain situations where you can DIY the repairs. Patching them up is relatively easy and here’s how you can go about it.

1. Detect the leak

How to fix leaking pipes

Minor leakages can happen for several reasons. Most of the time it’s caused by the joints between the pipes that have become loose or the old seals that are no longer working. First, you want to run your hands around your pipes to detect where the leaks have sprung.

Using your hands to detect the leaks is a handy trick as some pipes may be located in dark places, like under your sink. In those cases, you’ll still be able to feel the leaks with your hands much better than sticking your head under the sink.

2. Shut off the main water supply

How to fix leaking pipes

After detecting the problem area, shutting off the main water supply before you fix the leak is key. Leaving it on will only allow water to simply flow through the pipes and cause more water to spill out from the pipes.

Don’t forget to leave it off for at least 4 hours after you have treated the leaky area in order to let the patching dry and set. Some methods require you to leave the water turned off for longer.

Now that your main water supply is shut off, it’s time to dive into the different methods to stop the leaks.

3. Method 1: Adhesive Sealing Tape

How to fix leaking pipes

Adhesive Sealing Tapes are great for leaky pipe joints because most of these tapes are soft, pliable and can easily adapt to the shape of the pipe joint. You can easily find this tape at a hardware store, we highly recommend you get one that is at least 1.5 or 2.0 cm in width so that you can cover as much area as possible.

One of the best features about the tape is you don’t have to wait long for it to set before turning the water supply back on. The only downside is that sealing tapes are only good for solving minor leaks and temporarily, they simply aren’t strong enough for more major leaks.

4. Method 2: Epoxy Resin

How to fix leaking pipes

Epoxy is a type of plastic-based putty that becomes solid when it dries. You can find these putties sold in little rolls at hardware stores. To fix the leaking pipes, all you have to do is spread it around the leak and let it dry for about 3 to 4 hours. The putty will patch any pinholes or cracks as it dries to stop the leak.

Epoxy resin is a very flexible material which makes it a suitable choice to patch leaks for both metal and PVC pipes.

5. Method 3: Cold/Heat Shrink Sleeves

How to fix leaking pipes

Cold/heat shrink sleeves are polymer sleeves that shrink when heated. They are able to fix parts of your pipe where you can easily fit the sleeves through and are able to adhere to the pipes and seal them.

However, these sleeves are not very strong so you can only use it if there’s a single leak without high water pressure.

Now that you have discovered the ways to fix your leaking pipes, it’s time to use this knowledge. Some of these fixes may not be very long-lasting, to get a more permanent fix for your leaks, do hire our professional plumbers and enjoy great benefits such as a reservice if unsatisfied.

There are many reasons why your pipes may be leaking, and it is vital that homeowners understand the damage that a leak can entail, and not to ignore it.

Leakage from various plumbing fixtures, mainly pipes, is one of the main causes of water in our homes today. In this guide, we will look at the main causes of leaking pipes and how you can help to prevent this from happening with a soft water solution.

Some of the reasons for leaking water pipes are:

  • Temperature changes – Pipes can freeze during the colder months of the year, causing them to contract. When water then runs through the pipes, they expand and cause gaps which can lead to leaks
  • Hard water – Mineral deposits from the hard water stick to the infrastructure’s interior and weaken the material. Some pipes spring pinhole leaks that seep under flooring, behind walls and through sewer lines. The buildup of calcium and magnesium can eventually cause cracking, clogging and backups
  • Deterioration – As your plumbing system ages, rust and other forms of corrosion can eat away at the pipes in your home and eventually create an opening for water to escape through
  • Bad workmanship – If an inexperienced or unqualified plumber has carried out the task of fitting or servicing your water pipes, this could lead to issues with leakage, if joints are not tight enough or the wrong materials have been used
  • Clogs – hair, dirt and grease can all play a part in clogging your drainage. You may notice your drains are clogged if your sinks, showers and toilets are draining much slower than usual

How to fix leaking pipes

How to stop a leaking water pipe

It is usually best to call in a professional plumber if you are not experienced or confident with tackling the issue yourself, as trying to fix a water pipe without the knowledge or experience can result in further damage being caused.

If you need a simple, temporary fix that can tide you over in the short term before implementing a long term solution by a professional, then there are a range of materials and solutions on the market to help with that such as:

Plumber’s Putty

For pinhole leaks or slightly larger, or if you have a leak at a fitting joint, plumbers putty is the simplest way to plug it and is widely available both online and in-store at DIY and home improvement stores.

Generally speaking, it consists of two components that when mixed together form a strong waterproof seal. To start, turn the water supply off. Clean and dry the section of the pipe where the leak is present. Work the putty into the hole and around it, using a putty knife if necessary to guarantee smooth coverage. Let the putty dry. Once it has fully hardened, turn the water back on and check for leaks – repeat the process if necessary.

Pipe repair clamp

A pipe repair clamp consists of two metal plates and a rubber patch which are placed over the hole and around the pipe, they are then tightened together with screws. This is a simple, quick and solid solution for repairs to pipes made of steel, copper, asbestos cements, cast iron and plastic pipes.

Pipe repair spray

Pipe repair spray is ideal for temporarily repairing leaks in pipes, guttering, drains, windows and roofs. It seals by seeping into the cracks and holes caused by the burst. A good pipe repair spray remains flexible and pliable for years and protects the surface from corrosion. Once dry, you can paint it any colour.

Pipe repair rubber tape

Pipe repair rubber tape is a good temporary fix for leaking pipes. Turn the water supply off and wrap the tape a few times around the leaking pipe to help make a watertight seal. Suitable for jointing, splicing and repairing cables, hoses, plastic and metallic tubes. This is also one of the most inexpensive ways to temporarily stop pipe leakage.

It is a good idea to find out the source of the pipe leak as this could be indicative of an eroding piping system. If this is the case, it is best to enlist a professional to look at the piping system before further damage may happen. These measures may help to temporarily halt the leak, but it could be a warning of a more serious issue.

How much does it cost to replace a water pipe?

According to checkatrade, the main factors affecting the cost of water pipe replacements are determined by:

  • Length of piping
  • Type of piping
  • Route of pipework
  • Your location

For accurate quotations on the cost of replacing a water pipe, it is recommended that you get in touch with a trusted plumbing professional.

Saving money on the maintenance of your water pipes

Hard water affects your plumbing system by creating a buildup of limescale in the pipes, which can lead to decreased water pressure and result in clogs. Stresses on the pipework can also cause bursts and leaks, which often means costly repairs.

As well as risking expensive damage to your plumbing pipework and appliances, hard water can significantly raise the energy costs of heating water through your boiler, whilst forcing your boiler to work harder and therefore reducing its lifespan.

One of the best ways to prevent damage to your water pipes and save money is to first combat hard water by having a water softener installed in your home, which could save you a lot of money in the long term. Hard water affects your plumbing system by creating a buildup of limescale in the pipes, which can lead to decreased water pressure and result in clogs. Stresses on the pipework can also cause bursts and leaks, which often means costly repairs.

As well as risking expensive damage to your plumbing pipework and appliances, hard water can significantly raise the energy costs of heating water through your boiler, whilst forcing your boiler to work harder and therefore reducing its lifespan.

One of the best ways to prevent damage to your water pipes and save money is to first combat hard water by having a water softener installed in your home, which could save you a lot of money in the long term.

Try out a water softener

To prevent the accumulation of limescale build up in your water pipes as a result of hard water, implementing a soft water solution can help save you money on not only your plumbing system but also on your laundry bills, make your appliances last longer and enable you to have bigger bubble baths, shinier homes and softer skin.

Why not get a quick quote and see whether you are eligible for our no-obligation, three month trial? 95% of people who try a trial of our water softening solution keep it!

How to fix leaking pipes

Have a leaking pipe on your hands? With our upfront pricing, you won’t need to worry what the repairs will cost.

What is a leaking pipe?

When water springs from a crack in your pipe, you have a leak. They’re most commonly found in your kitchen or bathroom, often from regular wear and tear, but they can also happen in the walls of your home or underneath your house.

Request an appointment to fix your leaking pipe

Have a leaking pipe on your hands? Don’t wait too long to contact a professional.

What Do I Do To Fix a Leaking Pipe?

Step 1: Turn off your “shut off water valve”

A leaking pipe has the potential to flood your home, so act quickly! To end the flow of water, you’ll need to shut off your home’s water using your main shut-off valve. These valves can be found in basements and outside; if you’re not familiar with where this valve is, call us!

How to fix leaking pipes

Step 2: Contact cure all plumbing

Whether or not you’ve turned off your water, a leaking pipe is an emergency! Call us and we’ll be on our way. We have a plumber on call 24-hrs a day to handle your plumbing emergencies, so don’t hesitate to reach out!

How to fix leaking pipes

How Do I Know If My Pipe Is Leaking?

Hearing Water Running in the Walls

Now, we know what it sounds like when an upstairs toilet is flushed and we hear the waste run through the wall. If you hear a constant “running of water” in your wall, it’s likely you have a leak. If you can’t see or feel any water yet, it is going somewhere you don’t want it to. Shut off your home’s water and call a plumber immediately.

Standing water

Before trying to sop and mop up water, turn off your home’s water with the main shut-off valve found outside. If you don’t know where that valve is, call us immediately! After the water is turned off and the professionals are on the way, you can begin to sop up the water and assess the damage. If the water damage is excessive, document it and consider calling your insurance company.

Broken Seals

Cracks might not always cause leaks; it’s possible the pipe or fixture is not sealed well. If you notice a horrendous smell coming from your toilet, but there’s no visible water or a sound of running water, it’s possible that the seal around the toilet is broken or worn. Seals around pipes can also wear out or not be applied correctly; we can correct these minor flaws and keep your plumbing system in check.

High Water Pressure

While high water pressure can ruin your appliances and fixtures, it will also increase the risk of causing leaks. Typically, your home should have a water pressure of about 50lbs; even just 60lbs is considered high water pressure. If you have high water pressure in your home, please contact us and we can help you install a high water pressure regulator to keep the pressure at a safe level in your home.

How to Fix a Leaking Pipe

First things first, you’ll need to find the location of the leak. If you think you have a leak, shut off the water to your entire home by using the shutoff valve, then call us. If you can’t find the shut-off valve or can’t manage to turn it off, call us immediately and we’ll be right over to help.

Temporary Repairs

Remember, putty, tape, and clamps are only a temporary repair you can make while the professionals are on the way. If you are finding yourself adding putty and tape to more and more pipes; schedule an appointment to have your entire plumbing system inspected.

Trenchless Repairs

Depending on where the leak is, we can use trenchless repair methods to fix the leak. If the leak is underneath your home, we can fix the leak without having to dig up your yard.

Replace Piping

Depending on how bad the crack is, we may need to replace some piping. Installing stronger piping and ensuring that it’s fixed with other pipes correctly will prevent future leaks.

How to Prevent Burst Pipes

Since leaks are caused by numerous things, it’s tough to prevent them all. However, if you have hard water depositing minerals in your pipes, high water pressure throughout your home, or pipes that are incorrectly fitted together, you’re more likely to have leaks. Inspect the piping before purchasing a home and then routinely inspect your pipes every year or so.

Frequently Asked Questions

+ How do I know if I have a leak if I can’t see it?

If you hear water in your walls or your water bill has increased for no seeable cause, it’s quite possible you have a leak. Turn off your home’s water with the shut off valve and call Cure All Plumbing!

+ How much does it cost to fix a leak?

The cost of repairing a leak can range significantly; it depends on how big the leak is and the materials needed to repair it. Most leak repairs will cost between $250 – $500.

+ What do I do if my water heater is leaking?

If it’s not a pipe, but your water heater tank that is leaking, it might be time to replace it. At Cure All Plumbing, we can help you find the best water heater option for your home; whether it’s a traditional tank water heater or tankless water heater.

Contact Cure All Plumbing

Water ruins everything when it slips into places it shouldn’t. If you’ve ever walked into your kitchen to find an inch of standing water, you know leaks can cause panic. Whether you find a small or large leak, the amount of water lost can add up quickly. Plus, the damage to your home can be staggering to repair. If you even suspect a leak in your home, call Cure All Plumbing as soon as possible! We’ll not only identify the leak, but we’ll repair it too.