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How to get healthy eyes

How to get healthy eyes

It’s easy to overlook your eyes when it comes to caring for your health, but there are simple things you can do every day to help keep your eyes in shape. Here are some easy ways to get started.

Have regular sight tests

As well as an eye health check, a sight test might help detect signs of underlying general health conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Everyone should have a sight test every two years, or more often if your optometrist recommends it.

Find an opticians practice on the NHS Choices website .

Eat healthily

Eating a healthy, balanced diet reduces your risk of eye disease. Include lots of omega-3 fats, found in oily fish, and lutein, found in dark-green, leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale. Vitamins A, C and E are also helpful, so eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. If you have a family history of macular degeneration (losing central vision in the eyes), ask your optometrist about taking nutritional supplements.

Stop smoking

Many people are unaware of the link between smoking and eye disease. If you smoke, stop. Smoking significantly increases the risk of developing eye diseases, such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. However long you have smoked it’s never too late to benefit from quitting.

Wear prescribed glasses

Many eye and vision problems develop or increase as we get older. Contrary to the myth, wearing glasses and contact lenses doesn’t make your eyesight worse – they help your eyes work more efficiently.

Take regular breaks

When you work on something close up, such as a computer, tablet or smartphone, your eye muscles are active. This may cause tiredness and headaches, even in those with normal sight. Follow the 20/20/20 rule – every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away, for 20 seconds. And don’t forget to blink, as this helps prevent your eyes drying out.

Wear sunglasses

As well as making your vision more comfortable in the sun, sunglasses protect your eyes from UV light. When choosing sunglasses, you should always make sure that they carry the CE or British Standard marks. There are different categories of sunglasses to choose from, including everyday wear, as well as frames for specialist sports. Exposure to UV when young does most harm, so protect children with sunglasses, as well as a hat and sunblock.

Avoid dry eyes

Eyes become dry, tired and sore if you are not producing enough tears or you have poor-quality tears. Central heating, air-conditioning and computer use can make it worse. Many adults suffer with dry eyes due to a health condition or medication. Lubricating eye drops can soothe irritation and reduce discomfort. You may find taking omega-3 supplements helps over time. Drink plenty of water and remember to blink often. If your eyes are persistently dry, tell your optometrist.

Research your family history

Many eye conditions run in families, from simple long and short sight to more serious diseases, such as glaucoma. Knowledge of problems with sight can help detect a condition before it becomes serious.

Remember your optometrist is the first person you should visit if you have any eye concerns. They can assess the problem and, if necessary, refer you to the right place for treatment.

Resources for your practice

How to get healthy eyesDownload Top tips for healthy eyes for our full guide, or you can share it in your practice if you’re an optometrist.

You can download a version of the ‘Love your eyes’ video for your practice. (On Internet Explorer, right click the link and select ‘Save target as’. On Chrome, right click the link and select ‘Save link as’. On Safari, right click and select ‘Download linked file’.)

How to get healthy eyes

Maintaining healthy vision is more than getting a regular vision screening. Your overall health can impact your eye health. Here are 6 tips for maintaining good eyesight.

Eat the Right Foods

Fill your plate with foods high in omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins C and E. These nutrients may help lower your chance of developing macular degeneration or cataracts. If you are looking for ways to indirectly maintain your eye sight, eat a healthy portion of green veggies, salmon, eggs, and citrus fruits. A healthy diet also decreases your chance of diabetes, which is one of the leading causes of blindness.

Use Protective Eyewear

An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is very important to wear proper eyewear to protect yourself from eye injuries.

Whether you’re on the job, working on a home improvement project, or playing hockey with the neighborhood, always wear protective eyewear or safety glasses to avoid the risk of anything making contact with your eyes.

How to get healthy eyesAlways Wear Sunglasses

Don’t just use the free pair of shades you picked up at a concert. The best way to keep your eyes healthy is to invest in a decent pair of sunglasses that will actually protect your eyes from the sun’s UV rays. Too much UV exposure increases your chances of cataracts.

When shopping for your next pair of sunglasses, look for 99-100% UVA and UVB protection.

Throw Away Old Makeup

  • Did you know bacteria grows fast in liquid makeup?
  • Replace your products every 3 months to avoid developing an eye infection.
  • Never share cosmetics with others and avoid the store samples.
  • Always clean your face before and after using makeup.

Need Help? Our Staff of Ophthalmologists in Toledo, OH Are Committed to Preserving & Improving Your Vision

Take Frequent Screen Breaks

  • When you stare at a computer, tablet or phone screen too long, you may experience eyestrain, dry eyes, neck and shoulder pain, and headaches. To avoid these things you should:
  • Take a screen break every 20 minutes
  • Find a supportive chair and make sure your screen is eye level
  • Keep your glasses/contacts prescription up to date and suitable for staring at screens
  • Remember to blink!

How to get healthy eyes

Get Regular Eye Screenings

Everyone should be getting eye screenings on a regular basis. During the screening, your doctor may recommend you schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist if they believe there is a potential vision or eye problem.

Here are some things you can expect during a comprehensive eye exam:

  • A review of your health and family history of eye disease, like glaucoma or macular degeneration
  • Vision testing
  • A dilated eye exam to check the retina and optic nerve
  • A refraction test to determine the sharpness of your near and distance vision

Anyone with symptoms or a family history of eye disease, diabetes, or high blood pressure should schedule an appointment with our team of ophthalmologists in Ann Arbor, MI to determine how frequently your eyes should be examined.

Need an eye screening? Schedule your appointment with Specialty Eye Institute!

There’s a lot you can do to keep your eyes healthy and protect your vision.

Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam

Getting a dilated eye exam is simple and painless — and it’s the single best thing you can do for your eye health!

Even if your eyes feel healthy, you could have a problem and not know it. That’s because many eye diseases don’t have any symptoms or warning signs.

A dilated eye exam is the only way to check for many eye diseases early on, when they’re easier to treat.

How to get healthy eyes

Need help finding an eye doctor?

Find out if you’re at risk for eye diseases

Getting older increases your risk of some eye diseases. You might also have a higher risk of some eye diseases if you:

  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have a family history of eye disease
  • Are African American, Hispanic, or Native American

Other health conditions, like diabetes or high blood pressure, can also increase your risk of some eye diseases. For example, people with diabetes are at risk for diabetic retinopathy — an eye condition that can cause vision loss and blindness.

If you’re worried you might be at risk for some eye diseases, talk to your doctor. You may be able to take steps to lower your risk.

Know your family’s health history. Talk with your family members to find out if they’ve had any eye problems. Some eye diseases and conditions run in families, like age-related macular degeneration or glaucoma. Be sure to tell your eye doctor if any eye diseases run in your family.

Take care of your health

Protecting your overall health can go a long way toward keeping your eyes healthy! It’s important to make healthy choices and take good care of yourself.

Keep in mind that healthy habits like eating well and being active can lower your risk for diseases and conditions that can lead to eye or vision problems, like diabetes or high blood pressure. Follow these tips for healthy vision:

Eat healthy foods. Be sure to have plenty of dark, leafy greens like spinach, kale, and collard greens. Eating fish that are high in omega-3 fatty acids — like salmon, tuna, and halibut — is good for your eyes, too.

Get active. Being physically active helps you stay healthy. It can also lower your risk of health conditions that can cause eye health or vision problems — like diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

Quit smoking. Smoking isn’t just bad for your lungs — it can hurt your eyes, too! Smoking increases your risk of diseases like macular degeneration and cataracts — and it can harm the optic nerve. If you’re ready to quit, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) for free support. You can also check out the resources on Smokefree.gov

Protect your eyes

Every day, you can take simple steps to keep your eyes healthy. Use these tips to protect your eyes from things that can harm them:

Wear sunglasses. Protect your eyes from the sun by wearing sunglasses — even on cloudy days! Be sure to look for sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation.

Wear protective eyewear. Safety glasses and goggles are designed to protect your eyes during certain activities, like playing sports, doing construction work, or doing home repairs. You can buy them from most eye care providers and some sporting goods stores. Get tips to protect your kids’ eyes when they play sports

Give your eyes a rest. Looking at a computer for a long time can tire out your eyes. Rest your eyes by taking a break every 20 minutes to look at something about 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

If you wear contacts, take steps to prevent eye infections. Always wash your hands before you put your contact lenses in or take them out. Be sure to disinfect your contact lenses and replace them regularly. Learn more about caring for contact lenses

How to get healthy eyes

Top Eight Ways to Improve Vision over 50

  • December 10, 2018
  • Vision and Age

Most adults start developing eyesight issues between their mid-40s and early 50s, particularly when reading and working on computers. Poor vision at close distances is one of the most common vision challenges between the ages of 40 and 60. However, this is a normal change with the eye’s ability to focus and may progress with time.

At first, you may have to hold reading materials far away to see them. With time, you may have to remove your glasses to see reading materials up close. Under dim lighting, print newspapers and restaurant menus may appear blurred.

Your vision may improve if you wear prescription glasses or contact lenses. But, if you want to do more to improve your vision, there are other ways to do so. In this article, we explore eight ways to improve your vision over 50.

1. Eat for your eyes

Eating carrots is good for your vision. Although it may sound cliché, it’s not entirely wrong. Carrots are rich in vitamin A, an essential nutrient for vision. However, vitamin A isn’t the only vitamin that promotes healthy eye function. Make sure that you include foods rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, copper, and zinc to your diet.

As you get older, macular degeneration can become your biggest challenge. Antioxidants can help reduce macular degeneration. As such, eat foods such as eggs, pumpkins, carrots, dark leafy greens, and sweet potatoes.

Fish is also great for your eyes. Coldwater fish such as mackerel, wild salmon, and cod are rich in DHA, a fatty acid that strengthens cell membranes, including those in your eyes.

2. Exercise for your eyes

Since eyes have muscles, they could use some exercises to remain in good shape. Eye exercises are great when done in the morning, when your eyes feel tired and before retiring to bed. If you’re consistent for a month, you may start noticing a difference.

Begin by warming your eyes for five seconds with warm palms. Do it three times. Rolling your eyes isn’t just an expression of annoyance, it can help your eye muscles too. Look up and circle your eyes about ten times in both directions.

To sharpen your focus, hold a pen at arm’s length and focus on it. Move the pen closer slowly until it’s about six inches from your nose. Redo this process ten times.

3. Full body exercise for vision

Exercising for at least twenty minutes a day is healthy for your entire body, including your eyes. Improved blood circulation is beneficial to the small blood vessels in the eyes as it removes harmful substances that may have been deposited. Exercise doesn’t have to be intense. In fact, a brisk walk is enough.

4. Rest for your eyes

Closing your eyes for just a few minutes is helpful. You can do this once an hour or many times when you’re hard at work. And if your job involves sitting in front of a computer or reading, closing your eyes can be refreshing. As simple as it sounds, this exercise can protect your eyes from over exertion or fatigue.

5. Get enough sleep

Resting your eyes for a couple of minutes isn’t enough. Your body requires regular, restful sleep. Any doctor will inform you about the importance of sleep for your health and wellbeing. When your body gets enough rest, your eyes become renewed. If you engage in intense visual activity such as working on a computer or reading a book, short breaks go a long way in helping your eyes, as it gives them a chance to rest.

6. Create eye-friendly surroundings

Plenty of things that surround us everyday can be bad for the eyes. For instance, sitting for long periods of time in front of a computer, getting swimming pool chlorine water in your eyes, using dim lighting when reading, and fluorescent lights can degrade your vision. Look out for these conditions and do all you can to reduce exposing your eyes to them.

7. Avoid smoking

Apart from being unhealthy for many reasons, smoking can contribute to blindness. Smoking can increase your chances of developing cataracts and can cause age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Additionally, smoking can reduce the number of antioxidants that are beneficial to your eyes.

8. Have regular eye exams

Most people wait until they experience eyesight problems to get eye exams. Sometimes, that can be too late. Getting eye exams early can help diagnose problems before they become severe. In fact, most vision defects can be corrected when detected early.

Regular vision exams can help by:

  • Adjusting prescriptions for corrective lenses: Vision changes with time and the eyeglasses that were once the best diopter might be damaging your eyes now.
  • Check alignment: Sometimes turned or crossed eyes can cause strain on eye muscles. Your eye doctor can help diagnose this issue early to avoid causing further damage to your eyes.
  • Eye tone: Eye tone changes with age and a corrective lens can bridge any defects.
  • Retina exam: Blood vessels present in the retina can be signs of diabetes. Eye exams can reveal more health issues beyond vision.

Conclusion

Beyond 50, vision can be challenging. However, it can be improved with a good lifestyle, healthy nutrition, and regular eye checkups.

How to get healthy eyes

Your children’s bodies change as they grow, and so do their eyes and eyesight. One of the best things you can do to protect your children’s sight and eye health is to see an eye doctor regularly, starting at least by your child’s first birthday.

However, there are many other ways you can help keep your child’s eyes healthy and their vision clear. August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month, and the pediatric ophthalmologists and optometrists at ABC Children’s Eye Specialists, PC , share important tips for helping your child have healthy eyes.

Introduce colorful toys and interactive games

Be sure to hang colorful mobiles or offer toys of different shapes and sizes for babies. These fun toys help promote visual engagement and development.

Additionally, games such as patty cake and peek-a-boo do more than make them giggle. They can help stimulate hand-eye coordination. Similarly, playing catch and other ball games can help school-aged children with the same skills.

Wear proper eyewear

Proper eyewear means making sure your child wears sunglasses with UV protection when they’re out in the sun. It also means using safety eyewear made with polycarbonate lenses, a shatterproof plastic, when your child is playing sports.

Monitor screen time

Excessive screen time is unhealthy for children in many ways. One of those ways is an adverse effect on their vision and eye health.

Staring at a digital device for too long and from too close can result in blurry vision, headaches, eyestrain, and dry eyes. Limit your child’s time in front of a screen, especially at night, and teach them the importance of giving their eyes a break.

Eat an eye-healthy diet

A healthy diet can protect your child against many health issues, including eye health issues. Foods high in nutrients like zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E, lutein, and omega-3 fatty acids are especially impactful on your child’s eyes.

You can find these nutrients in leafy green vegetables, salmon, tuna, citrus fruits, berries, and beans.

Keep an eye out for vision problems

In addition to getting regular eye exams, you should note if your child is exhibiting vision issues. Almost 7% of children younger than 18 years old in the United States have a diagnosed eye and vision condition .

For example, if you notice your child squinting, tilting their head, rubbing their eyes, or becoming highly sensitive to light, be sure to schedule an eye exam to discuss these issues with your eye doctor.

Do you have more questions about your child’s eye health? Are you ready to schedule an annual eye exam?

Call ABC Children’s Eye Specialists, PC , with offices in Mesa and Phoenix, Arizona, to schedule an appointment with one of our expert pediatric ophthalmologists or optometrists. You can also request one online through this website.

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Follow these simple guidelines for maintaining healthy eyes well into your golden years.

Your eyes are an important part of your health. You can do many things to keep them healthy and make sure you’re seeing your best. Follow these simple guidelines for maintaining healthy eyes well into your golden years.

Have a comprehensive dilated eye exam. You might think your vision is fine or that your eyes are healthy, but visiting your eye care professional for a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the only way to really be sure. When it comes to common vision problems, some people don’t realize they could see better with glasses or contact lenses. In addition, many common eye diseases, such as glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, and age-related macular degeneration, often have no warning signs. A dilated eye exam is the only way to detect these diseases in their early stages.

During a comprehensive dilated eye exam, your eye care professional places drops in your eyes to dilate, or widen, the pupil to allow more light to enter the eye—the same way an open door lets more light into a dark room. This process enables your eye care professional to get a good look at the back of the eyes and examine them for any signs of damage or disease. Your eye care professional is the only one who can determine if your eyes are healthy and if you’re seeing your best.

Maintain your blood sugar levels. 90% of blindness caused by diabetes is preventable. Ask your health care team to help you set and reach goals to manage your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol—also known as the ABCs of diabetes.

  • A1c: The goal set for many people is less than 7% for this blood test, but your doctor might set different goals for you.
  • Blood pressure: High blood pressure causes heart disease. The goal is less than 140/90 mmHg for most people, but your doctor might set different goals for you.
  • Cholesterol: LDL or “bad” cholesterol builds up and clogs your blood vessels. HDL or “good” cholesterol helps remove the “bad” cholesterol from your blood vessels. Ask what your cholesterol numbers should be.

Know your family’s eye health history. Talk to your family members about their eye health history. It’s important to know if anyone has been diagnosed with an eye disease or condition, since many are hereditary. This information will help to determine if you’re at higher risk for developing an eye disease or condition.

Eat right to protect your sight. You’ve heard that carrots are good for your eyes. But eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables—particularly dark leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, or collard greens—is important for keeping your eyes healthy, too. i Research has also shown there are eye health benefits from eating fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, and halibut.

Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing diabetes and other systemic conditions, which can lead to vision loss, such as diabetic eye disease or glaucoma. If you’re having trouble maintaining a healthy weight, talk to your doctor.

Wear protective eyewear. Wear protective eyewear when playing sports or doing activities around the home. Protective eyewear includes safety glasses and goggles, safety shields, and eye guards specially designed to provide the correct protection for the activity in which you’re engaged. Most protective eyewear lenses are made of polycarbonate, which is 10 times stronger than other plastics. Many eye care providers sell protective eyewear, as do some sporting goods stores.

Quit smoking or never start. Smoking is as bad for your eyes as it is for the rest of your body. Research has linked smoking to an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, cataract, and optic nerve damage, all of which can lead to blindness. ii, iii

Be cool and wear your shades. Sunglasses are a great fashion accessory, but their most important job is to protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation.

Give your eyes a rest. If you spend a lot of time at the computer or focusing on any one thing, you sometimes forget to blink and your eyes can get fatigued. Try the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, look away about 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds. This short exercise can help reduce eyestrain.

Clean your hands and your contact lenses—properly. To avoid the risk of infection, always wash your hands thoroughly before putting in or taking out your contact lenses. Make sure to disinfect contact lenses as instructed and replace them as appropriate. Learn more about keeping your eyes healthy while wearing contact lenses and listen to a podcast on keeping your eyes safe.

Practice workplace eye safety. Employers are required to provide a safe work environment. When protective eyewear is required as a part of your job, make a habit of wearing the appropriate type at all times, and encourage your coworkers to do the same.

References

i Age-Related Eye Disease Study Research Group. The relationship of dietary carotenoid with vitamin A, E, and C intake with age-related macular degeneration in a case-control study. Archives of Ophthalmology 2007; 125(9): 1225–1232.

ii Age-Related Eye Disease Study Research Group. Risk factors associated with age-related nuclear and cortical cataract. Ophthalmology 2001; 108(8): 1400–1408.

How to get healthy eyes

According to the National Eye Institute, staying active can help keep your eyes healthy. A poor diet and a lack of exercise can contribute to poor eyesight and certain diseases like glaucoma, cataracts, or age-related macular degeneration.

Studies have shown that there are links between certain foods and exercises and good eyesight. Foods that contain beneficial nutrients like vitamin C or vitamin E can help to improve your vision, eye health, and prevent age-related eye diseases. Similarly, certain cardiovascular exercises have been shown to improve ocular health too.

How Diet Impacts Eye Health

Diet has an impact on eye health, both directly and indirectly. A poor diet may lead to eye diseases and other issues. For example, the leading cause of vision loss in adults ages 20-74 is diabetic eye disease. Controlling your blood sugar levels and eating a healthy diet can help you manage your symptoms.

Foods rich in vitamin C and E are good for overall eye health. You can generally find these in leafy greens, sweet potatoes, meats, nuts, and beans. On the other hand, foods that have saturated fats and high sugar can be detrimental to your eye health.

Which Vitamins and Nutrients Are Beneficial for Eye Health?

These five vitamins and nutrients have been proven to be advantageous to your overall eye health. They are known to improve eyesight, prevent age-related cataracts, and help protect your eyes.

  • Vitamin C (or ascorbic acid): Found in fruits and vegetables. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that can help contribute to good eye health by providing structure.
  • Vitamin E: Found in nuts and sweet potatoes. Some studies have suggested that a diet rich in vitamin E can help prevent age-related cataracts.
  • Essential fatty acids: Found in salmon and tuna. Essential fatty acids may assist in preventing vision loss in older adults.
  • Lutein and zeaxanthin: Found in leafy greens and eggs, they filter out blue light that can be harmful to your eyes.
  • Zinc: Found in red meat, seafood, and eggs, zinc helps to create melanin.

Which Foods Are Good for Eye Health?

These foods are all rich in the right vitamins and nutrients known to improve eye health.

  • Fish has essential fatty acids that may help prevent cataracts. Especially fish like tuna, cod, and salmon.
  • Broccoli is a great source of vitamin C, and one cup has roughly twice as much as a single lemon.
  • Nuts and legumes are rich in essential fatty acids and vitamin E.
  • Seeds are rich in vitamin E – especially sunflower seeds!
  • Leafy greens are loaded with lutein and zeaxanthin.
  • Eggs are another great source of lutein and zeaxanthin.
  • Lean red meat, like beef, is full of zinc, which helps reduce the damaging effects of light.

How Exercise Impacts Eye Health

Staying physically active is important for your overall health, but there are also certain exercises that have a beneficial impact on eye health. Cardio can be especially beneficial because it helps keep blood pressure down. People who maintain a moderately physical lifestyle are 25% less likely to develop glaucoma than people who were mostly inactive.

A recent study by Elsevier indicates that there is an association between cardiovascular health and eye health. The study claims that of the 2.2 billion global cases of vision impairment or blindness, over half of them could have been prevented through better cardiovascular health.

While exercise and diet can be helpful in preventing good eye health, neither can reverse cataracts or their symptoms. You may still need eye surgery for cataracts or other eye diseases. But even after surgery, diet and exercise are essential for warding off illnesses and conditions that impact eye health.

What Exercises May Improve Eye Health?

Moderate to regular exercise is known to improve your eyesight, prevent age-related eye diseases, and reduce the risk of other health conditions that can lead to eye disease.

  • Walking or running: A brisk walk three times a week can help improve your eye health. Walking and running can help to improve the blood flow to your retina and optic nerve.
  • Swimming: Swimming is an excellent cardiovascular exercise and can improve your eye health as well.
  • Dancing: This is a fun way to stay in shape and improve your eye health. Dancing exercises like Zumba or aerobics can also help relieve pressure in your eyes.
  • Bike riding: Riding a bike regularly can help improve your vision and prevent age-related cataracts and glaucoma.

Eye Exercises for Vision Health

In addition to physical exercise, there are also some eye exercises you can do to improve vision health. These are exercises that will help with eye fatigue and keep your eyes from becoming strained or irritated.

Your eyes are an important part of your health. There are many things you can do to keep them healthy and make sure you are seeing your best. Follow these simple steps for maintaining healthy eyes well into your golden years.

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Have a comprehensive dilated eye exam

You might think your vision is fine or that your eyes are healthy, but visiting your eye care professional for a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the only way to really be sure. When it comes to common vision problems, some people don’t realize they could see better with glasses or contact lenses. In addition, many common eye diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic eye disease and age-related macular degeneration often have no warning signs. A dilated eye exam is the only way to detect these diseases in their early stages.

During a comprehensive dilated eye exam, your eye care professional places drops in your eyes to dilate or widen the pupil to allow more light to enter the eye, the same way an open door lets more light into a dark room. This enables your eye care professional to get a good look at the back of the eyes and examine them for any signs of damage or disease. Your eye care professional is the only one who can determine if your eyes are healthy and if your vision is at its best.

Know your family’s eye health history

Talk to your family members about their eye health history. It’s important to know if anyone has been diagnosed with a disease or condition, since many are hereditary. This will help to determine if you are at higher risk of developing an eye disease or condition.

Eat right to protect your sight

You’ve heard carrots are good for your eyes. But eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, particularly dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale or collard greens is important for keeping your eyes healthy too. Research has also shown there are eye health benefits from eating fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna and halibut.

Maintain a healthy weight

Being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing diabetes and other systemic conditions, which can lead to vision loss, such as diabetic eye disease or glaucoma. If you are having trouble maintaining a healthy weight, talk to your doctor.

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Wear protective e yewear

Wear protective eye wear when playing sports or doing activities around the home. Protective eye wear includes safety glasses and goggles, safety shields, and eye guards specially designed to provide the correct protection for a certain activity. Most protective eye wear lenses are made of poly carbonate, which is 10 times stronger than other plastics. Many eye care providers sell protective eye wear, as do some sporting goods stores.

Quit smoking or never start

Smoking is as bad for your eyes as it is for the rest of your body. Research has linked smoking to an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, cataract, and optic nerve damage, all of which can lead to blindness.

Be cool and wear your shades

Sunglasses are a great fashion accessory, but their most important job is to protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation.

Give your eyes a rest

If you spend a lot of time at the computer or focusing on any one thing, you sometimes forget to blink and your eyes can get fatigued. Try the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, look away about 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds. This can help reduce eyestrain.

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Clean your hands and your contact lenses properly

To avoid the risk of infection, always wash your hands thoroughly before putting in or taking out your contact lenses. Make sure to disinfect contact lenses as instructed and replace them as appropriate.

Practice workplace eye safety

Employers are required to provide a safe work environment. When protective eye wear is required as a part of your job, make a habit of wearing the appropriate type at all times and encourage your co-workers to do the same.

How to get healthy eyes

The eyes are an important part of your overall health and well-being. Unfortunately, few people take the time to care for their eyes until they have a problem with them. This is a big mistake.

Many eye diseases develop chronically with age, and there are several simple steps you can take to prolong healthy vision and take good care of your eyes over the years. So without further ado, here is your 5-step guide to healthy eyes:

1) Diet

How to get healthy eyes

Believe it or not, there are numerous vitamin supplements and food types that are proven to reduce the risk of eye disease later in life. For example, Vitamin A can help prevent blindness while Vitamin C can slow the progress of glaucoma. For a natural source of these nutrients, make sure to incorporate the following foods into your diet:

Fruits & Vegetables: Fruits and vegetables are an important source of the vitamins and antioxidants that keep your eyes strong. Carrots, spinach, kale, turnips, berries (blueberries, blackberries) and citrus fruits are all a good source of nutrients.

Lean Meats & Seafood: Seafood is especially helpful because it is low in fat and contains omega-3 fatty acids. These acids combat chronic dry eye and prevent the natural age-related degeneration of your eye tissue. Seafood to eat includes salmon, mackerel, herring, sardines, oysters and crab. Other good sources of protein include eggs, milk, nuts and legumes (beans).

Multivitamins: Even when eating right, it can be hard to incorporate every vitamin that your body needs. I would suggest taking a multivitamin in addition to whatever fruits and vegetables you can fit in. Fish oil, flaxseed, zinc and selenium supplements can also be helpful.

2) Computer Vision

How to get healthy eyes

The modern workplace presents eye care issues that are unique to this generation. Many people spend 8 hours a day staring closely into a brightly lit computer screen, not to mention the personal time they spend looking at smartphones, laptops and TV screens.

The damage from this digital eye strain can compound over time and lead to serious vision problems. To avoid the problem that has now been dubbed “Computer Vision Syndrome”, try to practice the following tips:

Adjust Brightness: The room you are in should only be half as bright as the screen you are staring at. Most offices and workspaces are far too bright in this regard. You should also adjust the screen brightness down and wait for your eyes to adjust. You’ll be shocked at how bright your display has been.

Eliminate Glare: Remove sources of glare coming from windows, desk lamps or other screens. Try to rely as much as possible on indirect lighting.

Blink: Blinking more often can help keep your eyes active and limit the discomfort caused by dry, overworked eyes. Follow the simple 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes, spend 20 seconds looking at an object 20 feet away. This will help greatly.

3) Sunglasses

How to get healthy eyes

Another source of cumulative damage to your eyes comes from the sun. Ideally, you should wear sunglasses at all times when you’re outside. Even when it’s cloudy, UV rays are penetrating and can cause retinal damage and vision loss. New studies suggest that even children should begin wearing sunglasses at an early age.

When buying sunglasses, make sure that the pair you get (no matter how fashionable) is 100% protected against UVA and UVB light. Wrap-around lenses that cover the sides of your eyes are also preferable, and polarized lenses can cut down on the amount of glare reaching your eyes.

4) Eye Safety

Eye safety is a situational factor that you should be aware of whenever there are potential irritants or hazards in the area. Many people think that eye safety is only relevant to dangerous work environments, but there are many household items that can cause minor eye injuries. Common dangers include:

-Household Chemicals (paint, bleach, soap, kitchen cleaners, etc.)

-Airborne Particles (sawdust, dirt, sand, pollen)

-Small Objects (garden tools, screwdrivers, loose nails)

-Makeup Items (curling irons, mascara brushes, etc.)

If you have children, it is especially important to remain vigilant of anything that could be accidentally blown or splashed into someone’s eyes. Keep chemicals and sharp objects in a safe place, and buy some safety glasses whenever you have work to do around the house.

5) Eye Exams

How to get healthy eyes

Its important to have regularly scheduled eye exams to check for any problems (nearsightedness, astigmatism or color blindness) that may be developing. Children in particular need to have their eyesight monitored closely, as poor vision can slow learning and lead to other problems in school.

Make sure that you are receiving a comprehensive eye exam from a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist (opticians are not doctors), and get started at an early age. The recommended lifetime schedule for eye exams is as follows:

-One exam at 6 months

-One exam at age 3

-One exam before starting pre-school

-One exam every 2 years thereafter

-Seniors age 60 and above should have an eye exam once a year

-Immediately upon any serious eye infection or injury

People vary greatly when it comes to eyesight, and almost everyone will be prone to an age-related vision problem at some point in their life. But these steps will help you take good care of your eyes, eliminate chronic eye conditions, and head off any serious problems that may come. Your eyes are an important part of your body. Start taking care of them now.